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Author Houpt, K.A. openurl 
  Title Why horse behaviour is important to the equine clinician Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Equine veterinary journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 38 Issue 5 Pages 386-387  
  Keywords Accidents, Occupational/prevention & control; Aggression; Animals; *Behavior, Animal/physiology; Clinical Competence; Fear; Horses/*physiology; Humans; Veterinarians/psychology; Veterinary Medicine/*standards  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-6401, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16986596 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 30  
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Author Virga, V.; Houpt, K.A. openurl 
  Title Prevalence of placentophagia in horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Equine veterinary journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 33 Issue 2 Pages 208-210  
  Keywords Animals; *Behavior, Animal; Colic/epidemiology/*veterinary; Exploratory Behavior; *Feeding Behavior; Female; Horse Diseases/*epidemiology; Horses; Incidence; New York/epidemiology; *Placenta; Postpartum Period; Pregnancy; Prevalence; Questionnaires  
  Abstract  
  Address Animal Behavior Clinic, Cornell University Hospital for Animals, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:11266073 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 31  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Houpt, K.A.; Eggleston, A.; Kunkle, K.; Houpt, T.R. openurl 
  Title Effect of water restriction on equine behaviour and physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Equine veterinary journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 341-344  
  Keywords Animals; *Behavior, Animal; Blood Proteins/analysis; Energy Intake; Female; Horse Diseases/physiopathology; Horses/*physiology; Osmolar Concentration; Pregnancy; Stress/veterinary; Video Recording; Water Deprivation/*physiology  
  Abstract Six pregnant mares were used to determine what level of water restriction causes physiological and/or behavioural changes indicative of stress. Nonlegume hay was fed ad libitum. During the first week of restriction, 5 l water/100 kg bwt was available, during the second week 4 l/100 kg bwt and, during the third week, 3 l/100 kg bwt. Ad libitum water intake was 6.9 l/100 kg bwt; at 3 l/100 kg bwt water intake was 42% of this. Daily hay intake fell significantly with increasing water restriction from 12.9 +/- 0.75 kg to 8.3 +/- 0.54 kg; bodyweight fell significantly for a total loss of 48.5 +/- 8.3 kg in 3 weeks. Daily blood samples were analysed; osmolality rose significantly with increasing water restriction from 282 +/- 0.7 mosmols/kg to 293.3 +/- 0.8 mosmols/kg bwt, but plasma protein and PCV did not change significantly. Cortisol concentrations fell from 8.1 ng/ml to 6.4 ng/ml over the 3 week period. Aldosterone fell from 211.3 +/- 74.2 pg/ml to 92.5 +/- 27.5 pg/ml at the end of the first week. The behaviour of 4 of the 6 mares was recorded 24 h/day for the duration of the study. The only significant difference was in time spent eating, which decreased with increasing water restriction from 46 +/- 3% to 30 +/- 3%. It is concluded that water restriction to 4 l/100 kg bwt dehydrates pregnant mares and may diminish their welfare, but is not life- or pregnancy-threatening.  
  Address Department of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-6401, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:10952384 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 32  
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Author Turpeinen, O. openurl 
  Title Effect of cholesterol-lowering diet on mortality from coronary heart disease and other causes Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Circulation Abbreviated Journal Circulation  
  Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 1-7  
  Keywords Coronary Disease/blood/*mortality/prevention & control; Dairy Products; *Dietary Fats; *Fats, Unsaturated; Finland; Humans; Hypercholesterolemia/complications/*diet therapy/mortality; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasms/mortality  
  Abstract International statistics indicate that there is a close correlation between the consumption of saturated fats (dairy fats and meat fats) and the mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD), and this conception has been confirmed by many epidemiological studies. Such studies alone, however, cannot prove the existence of a cause-and-effect relationship between these two variables; dietary intervention trials are needed. The Finnish Mental Hospital Study was such a trial, conducted in two hospitals near Helsinki in 1959--1971. Practically total replacement of dairy fats by vegetable oils in the diets of these hospitals was followed by a substantial reduction in the mortality of men from CHD. Total mortality also appeared to be reduced. As to the causes of death other than CHD, none was significantly influenced by dietary change. This was also true for malignant neoplasms. To alleviate the burden of CHD on public health, many investigators have recommended important changes in the quantity and quality of dietary fats.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0009-7322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:758101 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 33  
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Author Houpt, K.A. openurl 
  Title New perspectives on equine stereotypic behaviour Type Editorial
  Year 1995 Publication Equine veterinary journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 82-83  
  Keywords Animals; Horses/*psychology; Stereotyped Behavior/*physiology  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:7607153 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 34  
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Author Aviad, A.D.; Houpt, J.B. openurl 
  Title The molecular weight of therapeutic hyaluronan (sodium hyaluronate): how significant is it? Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication The Journal of rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 297-301  
  Keywords Animals; Horse Diseases/drug therapy; Horses; Humans; Hyaluronic Acid/*chemistry/*therapeutic use; Joint Diseases/*drug therapy/veterinary; Molecular Weight; Osteoarthritis/drug therapy/veterinary; Synovial Fluid/drug effects/physiology; Viscosity  
  Abstract Various molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) preparations have been injected into joints for the treatment of human and equine osteoarthritis. A therapeutic advantage has been claimed for commercial products with a molecular weight in the range found in normal synovial fluid (SF), compared to lower molecular weight products. But a correlation between molecular weight and efficacy is not borne out by an analysis of the available literature on clinical results. SF viscosity, HA concentration, HA molecular weight and rate of synthesis in joint disease. It is proposed that the beneficial effect of injected HA in joint disease may be due to pharmacological rather than to physical properties.  
  Address Rheumatic Disease Unit, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, ON, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0315-162X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8182640 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 35  
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Author Houpt, K.A.; Feldman, J. openurl 
  Title Animal behavior case of the month. Aggression toward a neonatal foal by its dam Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 203 Issue 9 Pages 1279-1280  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Newborn; *Behavior, Animal; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Horses/*psychology; *Maternal Behavior; Rejection (Psychology); Restraint, Physical/veterinary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-1488 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8253618 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 36  
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Author Houpt, K.A.; Smith, R. openurl 
  Title Animal behavior case of the month Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Vet Med Assoc  
  Volume 203 Issue 3 Pages 377-378  
  Keywords Aggression; Animals; Animals, Zoo/*psychology; *Behavior, Animal; *Feeding Behavior; Female; Horses/*psychology; *Weaning  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-1488 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8226214 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 37  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Houpt, K.A.; Northrup, N.; Wheatley, T.; Houpt, T.R. openurl 
  Title Thirst and salt appetite in horses treated with furosemide Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol  
  Volume 71 Issue 6 Pages 2380-2386  
  Keywords Animals; Appetite/*drug effects; Blood Volume; Diuresis; Drinking/drug effects; Female; Furosemide/*pharmacology; Horses; Natriuresis; Sodium, Dietary/*administration & dosage; Thirst/*drug effects  
  Abstract When a preliminary experiment in sodium-replete ponies revealed an increase, but not a significant increase, in salt consumption after furosemide treatment, the experiment was repeated using sodium-deficient horses in which aldosterone levels might be expected to be elevated to test the hypothesis that a background of aldosterone is necessary for salt appetite. Ten Standardbred mares were injected intravenously with furosemide or an equivalent volume of 0.9% sodium chloride as a control to test the effect of furosemide on their salt appetite and blood constituents. Sodium intake and sodium loss in urine, as well as water intake and urine output, were measured and compared to determine accuracy of compensation for natriuresis and diuresis. Plasma protein and packed cell volume showed significant increases in response to furosemide treatment (F = 29.31, P less than 0.001 and F = 11.20, P less than 0.001, respectively). There were no significant changes in plasma sodium concentration or osmolality in response to the treatment (P greater than 0.05). The furosemide-treated horses consumed 126 +/- 14.8 g salt, significantly more than when they were given the control injection (94.5 +/- 9.8 g; t = 2.22, P = 0.05). In response to furosemide, horses lost 962 +/- 79.7 and consumed 2,170 +/- 5 meq sodium; however, compared with control, they lost 955 meq more sodium and ingested only 570 meq more sodium, so they were undercompensating for natriuresis. The furosemide-treated horses drank 9.6 +/- 0.8 kg of water, significantly more than when they received the control injection (6.4 +/- 0.8 kg; t = 6.9, P less than 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)  
  Address Department of Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-6401  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 8750-7587 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:1778936 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 38  
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Author Vollmerhaus, B.; Roos, H.; Gerhards, H.; Knospe, C. openurl 
  Title [Phylogeny, form and function of canine teeth in the horse] Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Anatomia, histologia, embryologia Abbreviated Journal Anat Histol Embryol  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 212-217  
  Keywords Animals; Cuspid/*anatomy & histology/radiography; Evolution; Horses/*anatomy & histology; Male; Phylogeny; *Social Dominance  
  Abstract The canine teeth of the horse developed phylogenically from the simple, pointed, short-rooted tooth form of the leaf eating, in pairs living, Eocene horse Hyracotherium and served up to the Oligocene as a means of defense (self preservation). In the Miocene the living conditions of the Merychippus changed and they took to eating grass and adopted as a new behavior the life in a herd. The canine teeth possibly played an important role in fights for social ranking; they changed from a crown form to knife-like shape. In the Pliohippus the canine tooth usually remained in male horses and since the Pliocene, it contributed to the fights between stallions, to ensure that the offspring only came from the strongest animals (preservation of the species). Form and construction of the canine tooth are described and discussed in detail under the above mentioned phylogenic and ethologic aspects.  
  Address Institut fur Tieranatomie und Chirurgische Tierklinik der Universitat Munchen, Veterinarstrasse 13, D 80539 Munchen, Deutschland. c-neumueller@anat.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title [Zur Phylogenie, Form und Funktion der Dentes canini des Pferdes]  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-2096 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12919071 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 672  
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