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Author Adelman, M.; Knijnik, J. doi  isbn
openurl 
  Title Gender and Equestrian Sport Type Book Whole
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords British Equestrian Sport Canadian Show Jumping Cojones and Rejones Comparative Analysis Equestrian World through a Gender Lens Equestrianism during the 20th Century Fluid Masculinities on Brazilian Dressage Gender Studies and Equestrian Sport Horseracing and Gender in the United Kingdom Juvenile Equine Fiction for Girls Men and Horse Riding Spanish Mounted Bullfight Sport and Culture Swedish Equestrian Sports Women Riding Rodeo in Southern Brazil Women in Equestrian Polo  
  Abstract This volume brings together studies from various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities (Anthropology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, History and Literary theory) that examine the equestrian world as a historically gendered and highly dynamic field of contemporary sport and culture. From elite international dressage and jumping, polo and the turf, to the rodeo world of the Americas and popular forms of equestrian sport and culture, we are introduced to a range of issues as they unfold at local and global, national and international levels. Students and scholars of gender, culture and sport will find much of interest in this original look at contemporary issues such as “engendered” (women’s and men’s) dentities/subjectivities of equestrians, representations of girls, horses and the world of adventure in juvenile fiction; the current “feminization” of particular equestrian activities (and where boys and men stand in relation to this); how broad forms of social inequality and stratification play themselves out within gendered equestrian contexts; men and women and their relation to horses within the framework of current discussions on the relation of animals to humans (which may include not only love and care, but also exploitation and violence), among others. Singular contributions that incorporate a wide variety of classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical methodologies show how horse cultures around the globe contribute to historical and current constructions of embodied “femininities” and “masculinities”, reflecting a world that has been moving “beyond the binaries” while continuing to be enmeshed in their persistent and contradictory legacy. The final chapter makes a brave attempt at synthesizing individual chapters and moving forward from the evidences they provide, to suggest a compelling agenda for future research.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Dordrecht Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-94-007-6823-9 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6389  
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Author Aldridge, B.; Lescun, T.; Radcliffe, J.S. pdf  openurl
  Title Recent Molecular Advances in Equine Nutrition – from Test Tube to Practice Type Conference Article
  Year 2012 Publication Proceedings of the 2. International Equine Science Meeting Abbreviated Journal Proc. 2. Int. Equine. Sci. Mtg  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Molecular Biology, Equine, Gut  
  Abstract The use of molecular techniques has increased our understanding of biological systems; in particular how genes and proteins operate within a cell or organ in response to various stimuli. These techniques can be used to study modes of action or mechanisms in disease states, or in response to applied management or nutritional changes. While applied and basic research are often conducted independent of one another, the real advantages to the equine industry will come from the use of molecular techniques to address applied challenges and/or opportunities within the industry. Therefore, the overall goal of our research has been to use basic and molecular tools to investigate modes of action resulting from changes in nutrition or management. We investigated active nutrient transport capacities of the small and large intestine, the effects of feed withdrawal on intestinal transporter gene expression and function, as well as other measurements pertaining to gut health (gut barrier function and gastrointestinal morphology). This novel and thorough approach to characterize sectional differences (fore- and hind- gut) of nutrient absorption has resulted in quantitative measures of active transport capacity for glucose, phosphorus, glutamine, lysine, and di-peptides in the horse. This research demonstrates that by-products of fermentation in the cecum such as microbial proteins and hydrolyzed phytate phosphorus, can be absorbed in the colon. Previously unidentified in the hindgut of the horse, we reported the expression of the di-and tri-peptide transporter, PepT1, as well as the neutral amino acid transporter, ASCT2, and transport of their substrates. We observed that nutrient transporters for glucose (SGLT1), glutamine (ASCT2) and for di-peptides (PepT1) can be regulated by diet, implying biological relevance to feeding management strategies. Feed withdrawal in horses pre- or post-surgery, prior to or during horse shows, during transport, or for other management reason is common. It is therefore important to understand how the removals of nutrients impacts gut health and/or disease susceptibility. The use of molecular techniques has provided a basis for the roles of certain core nutrients during times of feed withdrawal. For example, nutrients such as glutamine play a major role in proliferation and repair in the gut, serve as a major energy substrate, and may provide a means of assessing nutritional stress in the gut. Recent data concludes that following a feed withdrawal, the need for glutamine increases up to 116% in the proximal jejunum, and the gene expression of its transporter (ASCT2) increases by 78%. Additional studies utilizing molecular techniques to address nutritional challenges in the horse include how hormone loss due to ovariectomization impacts the homeostatic regulation of calcium and phosphorus in the horse. To improve nutrition and feeding management practices in horses, knowledge regarding how and where nutrients are absorbed, utilized and regulated under varying physiologic stressors (disease, exercise, reproductive status, etc.) is needed. The integration of applied and basic research facilitates a better and more complete understanding of mechanisms underlying common health and nutritional challenges facing the equine industry.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Aldridge, B. Thesis  
  Publisher Xenophon Publishing Place of Publication Wald Editor Krueger, K.;  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 978-3-9808134-26 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5575  
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Author Bast, T.F.; Whitney, E.; Benach, J.L. openurl 
  Title Considerations on the ecology of several arboviruses in eastern Long Island Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abbreviated Journal Am J Trop Med Hyg  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 109-115  
  Keywords Animals; Antibodies, Viral/analysis; Arboviruses/*isolation & purification; Birds; Brain/microbiology; Ecology; Encephalitis Virus, St. Louis/immunology/isolation & purification; Encephalitis Virus, Western Equine/immunology/isolation & purification; Encephalitis Viruses/immunology/isolation & purification; Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne/immunology/isolation & purification; Encephalomyelitis, Equine/epidemiology/veterinary; Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests; Horse Diseases/epidemiology; Horses; Humans; Insects; Liver/microbiology; Mites; Neutralization Tests; New York; Snakes; Ticks  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9637 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:4684881 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2715  
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Author Ben-Shlomo, G.; Plummer, C.; Barrie, K.; Brooks, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characterization of the normal dark adaptation curve of the horse Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Veterinary Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 42-45  
  Keywords adaptation; curve; dark; electroretinography; equine; scotopic  
  Abstract Objective The goal of this work is to study the dark adaptation curve of the normal horse electroretinogram (ERG). Procedures The electroretinographic responses were recorded from six healthy female ponies using a contact lens electrode and a mini-Ganzfeld electroretinographic unit. The horses were sedated intravenously with detomidine, an auriculopalpebral nerve block was then performed, and the pupil was fully dilated. The ERG was recorded in response to a low intensity light stimulus (30 mcd.s/m2) that was given at times (T) T = 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min of dark adaptation. Off-line analysis of the ERG was then performed. Results Mean b-wave amplitude of the full-field ERG increased continuously from 5 to 25 min of dark adaptation. The b-wave amplitude peaked at T = 25, however, there was no statistical significance between T = 20 and T = 25. The b-wave amplitude then remained elevated with no significant changes until the end of the study at T = 60 (P > 0.49). The b-wave implicit time increased continuously between T = 5 and T = 20, then gradually decreased until T = 60. No distinct a-wave was observed during the testing time. Conclusions Evaluation of horse rod function or combined rod/cone function by means of full-field ERG should be performed after a minimum 20 min of dark adaptation.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1463-5224 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5626  
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Author Berger, J isbn  openurl
  Title Wild horses of the Great Basin Type Book Whole
  Year 1986 Publication University of Chicago Press, Abbreviated Journal Univ. of Chic. Press  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords wildlife equine behaviour ecology  
  Abstract Describes the behavior of wild horses living in the Great Basin Desert of Nevada and discusses the role of the horses in the area's ecology  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-226-04367-3 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 659  
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Author Bertram, D.S. openurl 
  Title Mosquitoes of British Honduras, with some comments on malaria, and on arbovirus antibodies in man and equines Type Journal Article
  Year 1971 Publication Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Abbreviated Journal Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg  
  Volume 65 Issue 6 Pages 742-762  
  Keywords Aedes; Animals; Anopheles; Antibodies/*analysis; Arbovirus Infections/*epidemiology/immunology/veterinary; Belize; Culex; *Culicidae/classification; Ecology; Encephalitis Virus, St. Louis/immunology; Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/immunology; Horse Diseases/*epidemiology/immunology; Horses; Humans; Insect Vectors; Malaria/*epidemiology; Neutralization Tests; Seasons  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0035-9203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:4400502 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2732  
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Author Burn, C.C.; Dennison, T.L.; Whay, H.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationships between behaviour and health in working horses, donkeys, and mules in developing countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 126 Issue 3-4 Pages 109–118  
  Keywords Animal welfare; Developing countries; Equine; Human-animal relationships; Inactivity; Sickness behaviour  
  Abstract Recent studies raise serious welfare concerns regarding the estimated 93.6 million horses, donkeys and mules in developing countries. Most equids are used for work in poor communities, and are commonly afflicted with wounds, poor body condition, respiratory diseases, parasites, dental problems, and lameness. Non-physical welfare problems, such as fear of humans, are also of concern. Interventions to improve working equine welfare aim to prioritise the conditions that cause the most severe impositions on the animals' subjectively experienced welfare, but data identifying which conditions these may be, are lacking. Here we describe a stage in the validation of behavioural welfare indicators that form part of a working equine welfare assessment protocol. Over 4 years, behavioural and physical data were collected from 5481 donkeys, 4504 horses, and 858 mules across nine developing countries. Behaviours included the animals' general alertness, and their responses to four human-interaction tests, using the unfamiliar observer as the human stimulus. Avoidance behaviours correlated significantly with each other across the human-interaction tests, with 21% of animals avoiding the observer, but they showed no associations with likely anthropogenic injuries. Over 13% of equids appeared [`]apathetic': lethargic rather than alert. Measures of unresponsiveness correlated with each other across the five tests, and were associated with poor body condition, abnormal mucous membrane colour, faecal soiling, eye abnormalities, more severe wounds, and older age, depending on the equine species. This suggests that working equids in poor physical health show an unresponsive behavioural profile, consistent with sickness behaviour, exhaustion, chronic pain, or depression-like states.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5158  
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Author Carter, C.; Greening, L. url  openurl
  Title Auditory stimulation of the stabled equine; the effect of different music genres on behaviour Type Manuscript
  Year Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords equine, behaviour, music, environmental enrichment, auditory  
  Abstract Having a radio playing during the daytime at some equine establishments is common practice, but few studies have investigated whether particular music genres could be enriching for stabled horses or whether they may be perceived as aversive. This study aimed to establish whether behavioural responses differed when exposed to musical genres (Classical, Country, Jazz and Rock) and when compared to a control (no music). Eight Thoroughbred geldings (age range 8-10 years, average 8.9 years) were exposed to four musical environments and the control environment (no music) and observed in their usual stable, using instantaneous focal sampling every thirty seconds according to a pre-determined ethogram. Each horse was exposed to each genre for an hour in total, at a time when there was no human traffic or interference on the yard. All horses had been stabled for three hours before the study began. The association between genres and behavioural frequencies recorded for each environment was tested using Fisher’s Exact test of association (P<0.01), IBM SPSS21. No statistically significant associations (P=1.0) were recorded between alert or relax behaviours in Country, Classical, and Control environments. Significant associations (P<0.001) between frequency of alert behaviours and Jazz and Rock environments were noted. The latter genres appeared the most aversive which may be due to fast tempo and minor key, especially in the Jazz piece used. Country and Classical genres were slow tempo with a major key and appeared to result in more restful behaviours than Jazz or Rock. Further research is needed to; assess whether music could be used as an enriching tool, and investigate equine emotional capabilities to understand the emotional effects of music. Future studies could also consider how music impacts upon the behaviour of the human handler and whether this influences equine behaviour.  
  Address aCentre for Performance in Equestrian Sports, UWE Hartpury, Hartpury College, Gloucester, GL19  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5745  
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Author Crans, W.J.; McNelly, J.; Schulze, T.L.; Main, A. openurl 
  Title Isolation of eastern equine encephalitis virus from Aedes sollicitans during an epizootic in southern New Jersey Type Journal Article
  Year 1986 Publication Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Mosq Control Assoc  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 68-72  
  Keywords Aedes/*microbiology; Alphavirus/*isolation & purification; Animals; Disease Outbreaks/veterinary; Ecology; Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine/*isolation & purification; Encephalomyelitis, Equine/epidemiology/transmission/veterinary; Horse Diseases/epidemiology/transmission; Horses; Insect Vectors/microbiology; New Jersey  
  Abstract Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE) was isolated from the salt marsh mosquito, Aedes sollicitans, collected from coastal areas of New Jersey on 3 occasions during the late summer and fall of 1982. The isolations were made at a time when local Culiseta melanura were either undergoing a population increase or exhibiting high levels of EEE virus. Although no human cases were reported during the epizootic period, the data lend support to the hypothesis that Ae. sollicitans is capable of functioning as an epidemic vector in the coastal areas of New Jersey where human cases of EEE have been most common.  
  Address Mosquito Research and Control, Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 8756-971X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:2853203 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2684  
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Author Esch, L.; Wöhr, C.; Erhard, M.; Krueger, K. doi  openurl
  Title Horses’ (Equus Caballus) Laterality, Stress Hormones, and Task Related Behavior in Innovative Problem-Solving Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animals Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages 265  
  Keywords innovative behavior; brain lateralization; glucocorticoid metabolites; behavioral traits; equine cognition  
  Abstract Domesticated horses are constantly confronted with novel tasks. A recent study on anecdotal data indicates that some are innovative in dealing with such tasks. However, innovative behavior in horses has not previously been investigated under experimental conditions. In this study, we investigated whether 16 horses found an innovative solution when confronted with a novel feeder. Moreover, we investigated whether innovative behavior in horses may be affected by individual aspects such as: age, sex, size, motor and sensory laterality, fecal stress hormone concentrations (GCMs), and task-related behavior. Our study revealed evidence for 25% of the horses being capable of innovative problem solving for operating a novel feeder. Innovative horses of the present study were active, tenacious, and may be considered to have a higher inhibitory control, which was revealed by their task related behavior. Furthermore, they appeared to be emotional, reflected by high baseline GCM concentrations and a left sensory and motor laterality. These findings may contribute to the understanding of horses’ cognitive capacities to deal with their environment and calls for enriched environments in sports and leisure horse management.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Esch2019 Serial 6570  
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