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Author Goursot, C.; Düpjan, S.; Puppe, B.; Leliveld, L.M.C.
Title Affective styles and emotional lateralization: A promising framework for animal welfare research Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume 237 Issue Pages 105279
Keywords Individuality; Motor lateralization; Hemispheric dominance; Motivational tendencies; Emotional reactivity; Emotional regulation
Abstract The growing recognition of animals as individuals has broader implications for farm animal welfare research. Even under highly standardized on-farm conditions, farm animals show heterogeneous but individually consistent behavioural patterns towards various stimuli, based on how they appraise these stimuli. As a result, animal welfare is likely to be highly individual as well, and studying the proximate mechanisms underlying distinct individual behaviour patterns and appraisal will improve animal welfare research. We propose to extend the framework of affective styles to bridge the gap between existing research fields on animal personality and affective states. Affective styles refer to consistent individual differences in emotional reactivity and regulation and can be predicted by baseline cerebral lateralization. Likewise, animals with consistent left or right motor biases--a proxy measure of individual patterns in cerebral lateralization--have been shown to differ in their personality, emotional reactivity, motivational tendencies or coping styles. In this paper, we present the current knowledge of the links between laterality and stable individual traits in behaviour and affect in light of hypotheses on emotional lateralization. Within our suggested framework, we make recommendations on how to investigate affective styles in non-human animals and give practical examples. This approach has the potential to promote a science of affective styles in nonhuman animals and significantly advance research on animal welfare.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6698
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Author Christensen, J.W.; Munk, R.; Hawson, L.; Palme, R.; Larsen, T.; Egenvall, A.; König von Borstel, U.U.; Rørvang, M.V.
Title Rider effects on horses' conflict behaviour, rein tension, physiological measures and rideability scores Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume 234 Issue Pages 105184
Keywords Equitation science; Heart rate; Horse riding; Sport horse; Temperament; Training cues
Abstract Many breeding organisations include a subjective scoring of rideability by a professional rider into their evaluation of sports horses, but the consistency and reliability of the scoring system is debateable. The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether professional riders agree in their scoring of rideability, and (ii) whether rideability scores are affected by rein tension, horse conflict behaviour, heart rate, and salivary cortisol, and (iii) whether riders induce different levels of conflict behaviour and physiological responses in the horses. Ten professional, female riders each rode 10 dressage horses (level M German scale; n = 100 combinations) through a standardised dressage test (10 min warm-up followed by a 4-min test) and subsequently scored the horses for rideability on the official 1-10 scale (1 = poor to 10 = excellent) from the Danish Riding Federation. Rein tension, horse heart rate, saliva cortisol and conflict behaviour were measured for each rider-horse pair. The riders were inconsistent in their scoring of rideability to the individual horses, e.g. scores for one of the horses ranged from 1 to 8. There was a significant effect of rider (P = 0.003) and the frequency of conflict behaviour (undesired head movements: P < 0.001, breaking the gait: P = 0.013, and other evasive behaviour: P = 0.032) on rideability scores, i.e. the more conflict behaviour the lower the score. There was no significant effect of rein tension and the physiological measures on rideability scores. However, there was a significant effect of rider on rein tension, horses' heart rate and increases in saliva cortisol concentrations and a tendency for some types of conflict behaviour, suggesting that some riders induced more discomfort in the horses. Future studies could help shed light on which elements of riding style are particularly important for sports horse welfare. In conclusion, this study found a large variation in rideability scores assigned to ten sports horses by ten professional riders. Rideability scores were dependent on the level of horse conflict behaviour, but not rein tension and physiological measures. Further studies are needed to improve the objectivity, consistency and reliability of rideability assessment of sports horses.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6696
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Author Suagee-Bedore, J.K.; Linden, D.R.; Bennett-Wimbush, K.
Title Effect of Pen Size on Stress Responses of Stall-Housed Horses Receiving One Hour of Daily Turnout Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal J. Equine Vet. Sci.
Volume 98 Issue Pages 103366
Keywords Agonistic behaviors; Cortisol; Group turnout; Paddock sizes
Abstract Group turnout provides important socializing opportunities for horses, particularly those that are primarily stalled. A high percentage of equine injuries occur during group turnout, which could partly be due to the physical constraints of fencing. To investigate appropriate paddock sizes for group turnouts, horses (n = 12) from a single herd were divided into groups of 4, stalled for 24 hours, and then turned out for 1 hour into one of three differently sized pens: 342, 263, and 184 m2 per horse. Groups rotated through pens across 3 days, receiving one treatment per day. Blood was sampled for cortisol concentrations at 08:00 hours each morning, and then at 15 and 60 minutes into the turn out sessions, and 60 minutes after return to individual stalls. Groups rotated through three turnout times: 09:00, 12:00, 14:00 hours. Counts of agonistic behaviors (chasing, contact biting, and kicking) and low-level threats (pinned ears, tail swishing, bite and kick threats) were recorded. When turned out in pens that provided 342 m2 per horse, horses exhibited reduced plasma cortisol concentrations by 15 minutes after turnout and at 1 hour after return to their stalls (P < .05). Horses in pens providing 184 m2 per horse exhibited greater agonistic (P < .001) and low-level threat (P < .01) behaviors than horses in larger pens. These data provide insight into appropriate pen sizes for horses from established herds. Providing at least 342 m2 per horse may reduce the chance of injury in horses accustomed to group turnout.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6694
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Author Solmsen, E. - H.; Bathen, M.; Grüntjens, T.; Hempel, E.; Klose, M.; Krüger, K.; Martin, H.; Meyer, A.; Schütte, P.; Vogel, L.; Wiezorek, S.; Wittor, B.
Title Protecting horses against wolves in Germany. Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Carnivore Damage Prevention News Abbreviated Journal CDPNews
Volume 23 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6682
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Author Lagos, L.; Blanco, P.
Title Testing the use of dogs to prevent wolf attackson free ranging ponies in Iberia? Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Carnivore Damage Prevention News Abbreviated Journal CDPnews
Volume 23 Issue Pages 20-27
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6679
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Author Freitas, J.; Lagos, L.; Álvares, F.
Title Horses as prey of wolves. Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Carnivore Damage Preventionnews Abbreviated Journal CDPnews
Volume 23 Issue Pages 1-9
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6677
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Author Solmsen, E.-H.; Bathen, M.; Grüntjens, T.; Hempel, E.; Klose, M.; Krüger, K.; Martin, H.; Meyer, A.; Schütte, P.; Vogel, L.; Wiezorek, S.; Wittor, B.
Title Protecting horses against wolves in Germany Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Carnivore Damage Prevention News Abbreviated Journal CPDnews
Volume 23 Issue Pages 12-19
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6661
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Author Gadhöfer, R.; Krüger, K.; Zanger, M.
Title Der Bockhuf Entstehung, Verlauf und Therapie Type Book Whole
Year 2021 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Xenophon Verlag Place of Publication Wald Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3956250125 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6656
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Author Krueger, K.; Esch, L.; Byrne, R.
Title Need or opportunity? A study of innovations in equids Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One
Volume 16 Issue 9 Pages e0257730
Keywords
Abstract Debate persists over whether animals develop innovative solutions primarily in response to needs or conversely whether they innovate more when basic needs are covered and opportunity to develop novel behaviour is offered. We sourced 746 cases of “unusual” behaviour in equids by contacting equid owners and caretakers directly and via a website (https://innovative-behaviour.org), and by searching the internet platforms YouTube and Facebook for videos. The study investigated whether differences in need or opportunity for innovation were reflected in the numbers of different types of innovations and in the frequencies of repeating a once-innovative behaviour (i) with respect to the equids' sex, age, and breed type, (ii) across behavioural categories, and whether (iii) they were affected by the equids' management (single vs group housing, access to roughage feed, access to pasture, and social contact). We found that the numbers of different types of innovation and the frequency of displaying specific innovations were not affected by individual characteristics (sex, age, breed or equid species). Few types of innovation in escape and foraging contexts were observed, whilst the comfort, play, and social contexts elicited the greatest variety of innovations. We also found higher numbers of different types of innovations in horses kept in groups rather than in individual housing, and with unlimited rather than with restricted access to pasture and roughage. Equids in permanent social contact performed high rates of once-innovative behaviour. We suggest that equids produce goal-directed innovations and repeat the behaviour at high frequency in response to urgent needs for food and free movement or when kept in conditions with social conflict. However, equids devise the greatest variety of innovations when opportunity to play and to develop comfort behaviour arises and when kept in good conditions.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6653
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gadhöfer, R.; Krüger, K.; Zanger, M.
Title Der Bockhuf – Entstehung, Verlauf und Therapie Type Book Whole
Year 2021 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Xenophon Verlag Place of Publication Wald Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 13: 978-3956250125 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6652
Permanent link to this record