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Author Meek, P.D.; Ballard, G.-A.; Fleming, P.J.S.
Title The pitfalls of wildlife camera trapping as a survey tool in Australia Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Australian Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal Aust. Mammal.
Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 13-22
Keywords camera trap constraints, critical review, remote cameras.
Abstract Camera trapping is a relatively new addition to the wildlife survey repertoire in Australia. Its rapid adoption has been unparalleled in ecological science, but objective evaluation of camera traps and their application has not kept pace. With the aim of motivating practitioners to think more about selection and deployment of camera trap models in relation to research goals, we reviewed Australian camera trapping studies to determine how camera traps have been used and how their technological constraints may have affected reported results and conclusions. In the 54 camera trapping articles published between 1991 and 2013, mammals (86%) were studied more than birds (10%) and reptiles (3%), with small to medium-sized mammals being most studied. Australian camera trapping studies, like those elsewhere, have changed from more qualitative to more complex quantitative investigations. However, we found that camera trap constraints and limitations were rarely acknowledged, and we identified eight key issues requiring consideration and further research. These are: camera model, camera detection system, camera placement and orientation, triggering and recovery, camera trap settings, temperature differentials, species identification and behavioural responses of the animals to the cameras. In particular, alterations to animal behaviour by camera traps potentially have enormous influence on data quality, reliability and interpretation. The key issues were not considered in most Australian camera trap papers and require further study to better understand the factors that influence the analysis and interpretation of camera trap data and improve experimental design.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6704
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Author Burton, A.C.; Neilson, E.; Moreira, D.; Ladle, A.; Steenweg, R.; Fisher, J.T.; Bayne, E.; Boutin, S.
Title REVIEW: Wildlife camera trapping: a review and recommendations for linking surveys to ecological processes Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol
Volume 52 Issue 3 Pages 675-685
Keywords animal movement; camera trap; capture-recapture; density estimation; imperfect detection; mammal monitoring; occupancy model; relative abundance; sampling error; wildlife survey methodology
Abstract Summary Reliable assessment of animal populations is a long-standing challenge in wildlife ecology. Technological advances have led to widespread adoption of camera traps (CTs) to survey wildlife distribution, abundance and behaviour. As for any wildlife survey method, camera trapping must contend with sources of sampling error such as imperfect detection. Early applications focused on density estimation of naturally marked species, but there is growing interest in broad-scale CT surveys of unmarked populations and communities. Nevertheless, inferences based on detection indices are controversial, and the suitability of alternatives such as occupancy estimation is debatable. We reviewed 266 CT studies published between 2008 and 2013. We recorded study objectives and methodologies, evaluating the consistency of CT protocols and sampling designs, the extent to which CT surveys considered sampling error, and the linkages between analytical assumptions and species ecology. Nearly two-thirds of studies surveyed more than one species, and a majority used response variables that ignored imperfect detection (e.g. presence?absence, relative abundance). Many studies used opportunistic sampling and did not explicitly report details of sampling design and camera deployment that could affect conclusions. Most studies estimating density used capture?recapture methods on marked species, with spatially explicit methods becoming more prominent. Few studies estimated density for unmarked species, focusing instead on occupancy modelling or measures of relative abundance. While occupancy studies estimated detectability, most did not explicitly define key components of the modelling framework (e.g. a site) or discuss potential violations of model assumptions (e.g. site closure). Studies using relative abundance relied on assumptions of equal detectability, and most did not explicitly define expected relationships between measured responses and underlying ecological processes (e.g. animal abundance and movement). Synthesis and applications. The rapid adoption of camera traps represents an exciting transition in wildlife survey methodology. We remain optimistic about the technology's promise, but call for more explicit consideration of underlying processes of animal abundance, movement and detection by cameras, including more thorough reporting of methodological details and assumptions. Such transparency will facilitate efforts to evaluate and improve the reliability of camera trap surveys, ultimately leading to stronger inferences and helping to meet modern needs for effective ecological inquiry and biodiversity monitoring.
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Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
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Notes https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12432 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6703
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Author Grönemann, C.
Title Konfliktfeld Pferd und Wolf Eine Untersuchung zu Einstellungen, Erwartungen und Befürchtungen von Pferdehaltern und Reitsportlern in Niedersachsen Type Manuscript
Year 2015 Publication master thesis Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
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Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher Universität Hildesheim Place of Publication Hildesheim Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6683
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Author Ahrendt, L.P.; Labouriau, R.; Malmkvist, J.; Nicol, C.J.; Christensen, J.W.
Title Development of a standard test to assess negative reinforcement learning in horses Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume 169 Issue Pages 38-42
Keywords Algometry; Horse behaviour; Learning performance; Operant conditioning; Pressure-release; Horse training
Abstract Most horses are trained by negative reinforcement. Currently, however, no standardised test for evaluating horses' negative reinforcement learning ability is available. The aim of this study was to develop an objective test to investigate negative reinforcement learning in horses. Twenty-four Icelandic horses (3 years old) were included in this study. The horses were tested in a pressure-release task on three separate days with 10, 7 and 5 trials on each side, respectively. Each trial consisted of pressure being applied on the hindquarter with an algometer. The force of the pressure was increased until the horse moved laterally away from the point of pressure. There was a significant decrease in required force over trials on the first test day (P<0.001), but not the second and third day. The intercepts on days 2 and 3 differed significantly from day 1 (P<0.001), but not each other. Significantly stronger force was required on the right side compared to the left (P<0.001), but there was no difference between first and second side tested (P=0.56). Individual performance was evaluated by median-force and the change in force over trials on the first test day. These two measures may explain different characteristics of negative reinforcement learning. In conclusion, this study presents a novel, standardised test for evaluating negative reinforcement learning ability in horses.
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ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6650
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Author Stachurska, A.; Janczarek, I.; Wilk, I.; Kedzierski, W.
Title Does Music Influence Emotional State in Race Horses? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages 650-656
Keywords Cardiac activity; Emotional state; Music; Race horse
Abstract The aim of the study was to determine the effect of music featured in the barn, on the emotional state of race horses. Seventy 3-year-old Purebred Arabian horses in their first race season were divided into experimental group (EXP) of 40 horses and control group (CNT) of 30 horses and placed in separate barns. The EXP was subject to specifically composed music featured in the barn for 5 hours in the afternoon during the whole study. The emotional state in the horses was assessed at rest, saddling, and warm-up walk under rider. Measurements were taken six times, every 30 to 35 days, starting from the beginning of featuring the music. The horse's emotional state was assessed by cardiac activity variables. The music effect on the emotional state was also considered with regard to the horse's performance estimated by race records. The cardiac activity variables were compared with repeated measures design, whereas race records were analyzed with analysis of variance generalized linear model. The music positively affected the emotional state in race horses. The influence was noticeable already after the first month of featuring the music and increased in the second and third months. Despite the fact that later the variables began to return to initial levels, a positive effect of the music on prizes won by the horses in the EXP compared to the CNT was found (P < .05). The results suggest that the music may be featured in the barn, preferably for 2 to 3 months as a means of improving the welfare of race horses.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6632
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Author de Oliveira, K.; Soutello, R.V.G.; da Fonseca, R.; Costa, C.; de L. Meirelles, P.R.; Fachiolli, D.F.; Clayton, H.M.
Title Gymnastic Training and Dynamic Mobilization Exercises Improve Stride Quality and Increase Epaxial Muscle Size in Therapy Horses Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 35 Issue 11 Pages 888-893
Keywords Equine; Hippotherapy; Therapeutic exercise; Dynamic mobilization exercise; Physical training; Three-dimensional movement
Abstract The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of gymnastic training (GYM) and dynamic mobilization exercises (DMEs) on stride length (SL) and epaxial muscle size in therapy horses. Nine cross-bred hippotherapy horses that performed three, 25-minute therapeutic riding sessions per week throughout the study period were randomly assigned to three experimental groups: a control group in which the horses were sedentary with no additional physical activity; a group that performed DMEs; and a group that performed both DMEs and additional GYM including pelvic tilting, backing, turning in small circles, and walking over a raised rail to strengthen the abdominal and pelvic stabilizer muscles. The exercises were performed 3 days per week for 3 months, with evaluations at the start and end of the study. Stride quality was assessed by measuring SL and tracking distance (TD). Epaxial muscle size was monitored by ultrasonographic measurement of m. longissimus dorsi (LD) thickness and m. multifidi (MM) cross-sectional area. Paired t tests were used to compare within groups across time, and between groups were detected using analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc test. When walking at 1.3 m/s, SL and TD at walk increased significantly (P < .05) in horses subjected to GYM. Thickness of LD did not change in any group, but cross-sectional area of MM increased significantly by 3.55 cm2 (DME) and 3.78 cm2 (GYM). It was concluded that GYM training improved stride quality and DME-stimulated MM hypertrophy which has been shown to improve intervertebral joint stability in other species.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6593
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Author Burden, F.; Thiemann, A.
Title Donkeys Are Different Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the 2015 Equine Science Society Symposium
Volume 35 Issue 5 Pages 376-382
Keywords Donkey; Ass; Equid; Mule
Abstract As a unique species of equine, the donkey has certain specific variations from the horse. This review highlights the origins of the donkey and how this impacts on its behavior, physiology, and propensity to disease. The donkey is less of a flight animal and has been used by humans for pack and draught work, in areas where their ability to survive poorer diets, and transboundary disease while masking overt signs of pain and distress has made them indispensable to human livelihoods. When living as a companion animal, however, the donkey easily accumulates adipose tissue, and this may create a metabolically compromised individual prone to diseases of excess such as laminitis and hyperlipemia. They show anatomic variations from the horse especially in the hoof, upper airway, and their conformation. Variations in physiology lead to differences in the metabolism and distribution of many drugs. With over 44 million donkeys worldwide, it is important that veterinarians have the ability to understand and treat this equid effectively.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6541
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Author Lee, P.C.; de Antonio, C. A.
Title Necessity, unpredictability and opportunity: An exploration of ecological and social drivers of behavioral innovation. Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Animal Creativity and Innovation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 317- 333
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Cambridge Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6535
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Author Stecken, Paul
Title Bemerkungen und Zusammenhänge Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
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Publisher FNverlag der Deutschen Reiterlichen Vereinigung GmbH Place of Publication wARENDORF Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3-88542-889-3 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6511
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Author Passilongo, D.; Mattioli, L.; Bassi, E.; Szabó, L.; Apollonio, M.
Title Visualizing sound: counting wolves by using a spectral view of the chorus howling Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Frontiers in Zoology Abbreviated Journal Front. Zool.
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 22
Keywords
Abstract Monitoring large carnivores is a central issue in conservation biology. The wolf (Canis lupus) is the most studied large carnivore in the world. After a massive decline and several local extinctions, mostly due to direct persecutions, wolves are now recolonizing many areas of their historical natural range. One of the main monitoring techniques is the howling survey, which is based on the wolves' tendency to use vocalisations to mark territory ownership in response to howls of unknown individuals. In most cases wolf howling sessions are useful for the localisation of the pack, but they provide only an aural estimation of the chorus size.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-9994 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Passilongo2015 Serial 6498
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