toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links (down)
Author Milo, R.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Levitt, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Ayzenshtat, I.; Sheffer, M.; Alon, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Superfamilies of Evolved and Designed Networks Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 303 Issue 5663 Pages 1538-1542  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Complex biological, technological, and sociological networks can be of very different sizes and connectivities, making it difficult to compare their structures. Here we present an approach to systematically study similarity in the local structure of networks, based on the significance profile (SP) of small subgraphs in the network compared to randomized networks. We find several superfamilies of previously unrelated networks with very similar SPs. One superfamily, including transcription networks of microorganisms, represents “rate-limited” information-processing networks strongly constrained by the response time of their components. A distinct superfamily includes protein signaling, developmental genetic networks, and neuronal wiring. Additional superfamilies include power grids, protein-structure networks and geometric networks, World Wide Web links and social networks, and word-adjacency networks from different languages.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.1089167 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5033  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Silk, J.B.; Alberts, S.C.; Altmann, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social Bonds of Female Baboons Enhance Infant Survival Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 302 Issue 5648 Pages 1231-1234  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Among nonhuman primates, females often form strong bonds with kin and other group members. These relationships are thought to have adaptive value for females, but direct effects of sociality on fitness have never been demonstrated. We present 16 years of behavioral data from a well-studied population of wild baboons, which demonstrate that sociality of adult females is positively associated with infant survival, an important component of variation in female lifetime fitness. The effects of sociality on infant survival are independent of the effects of dominance rank, group membership, and environmental conditions. Our results are consistent with the evidence that social support has beneficial effects on human health and well-being across the life span. For humans and other primates, sociality has adaptive value.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.1088580 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5151  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Milo, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Chklovskii, D.; Alon, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 298 Issue 5594 Pages 824-827  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined “network motifs,” patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.298.5594.824 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5032  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McLaren, B.E.; Peterson, R.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wolves, Moose, and Tree Rings on Isle Royale Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 266 Issue 5190 Pages 1555-1558  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Investigation of tree growth in Isle Royale National Park in Michigan revealed the influence of herbivores and carnivores on plants in an intimately linked food chain. Plant growth rates were regulated by cycles in animal density and responded to annual changes in primary productivity only when released from herbivory by wolf predation. Isle Royale's dendrochronology complements a rich literature on food chain control in aquatic systems, which often supports a trophic cascade model. This study provides evidence of top-down control in a forested ecosystem.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4995  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bednarz, J.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cooperative Hunting Harris' Hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus) Type Journal Article
  Year 1988 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 239 Issue 4847 Pages 1525-1527  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Coordinated hunting by several individuals directed toward the capture and sharing of one Large prey animal has been documented convincingly only for a few mammalian carnivores. In New Mexico, Harris' hawks formed hunting parties of two to six individuals in the nonbreeding season. This behavior improved capture success and the average energy available per individual enabled hawks to dispatch prey larger than themselves. These patterns suggest that cooperation is important to understanding the evolution of complex social behavior in higher vertebrates and, specifically, that benefits derived from team hunting a key factor in the social living of Harris' hawks.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.239.4847.1525 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4717  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Axelrod, R.; Hamilton, W.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The evolution of cooperation Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 211 Issue 4489 Pages 1390-1396  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Cooperation in organisms, whether bacteria or primates, has been a difficulty for evolutionary theory since Darwin. On the assumption that interactions between pairs of individuals occur on a probabilistic basis, a model is developed based on the concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy in the context of the Prisoner's Dilemma game. Deductions from the model, and the results of a computer tournament show how cooperation based on reciprocity can get started in an asocial world, can thrive while interacting with a wide range of other strategies, and can resist invasion once fully established. Potential applications include specific aspects of territoriality, mating, and disease.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.7466396 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4933  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pennisi, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title PSYCHOLOGY: Nonhuman Primates Demonstrate Humanlike Reasoning Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 317 Issue 5843 Pages 1308-  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4240  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clayton, N.S. url  openurl
  Title COGNITION: An Open Sandwich or an Open Question? Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 305 Issue 5682 Pages 344-  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.1099512 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2955  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pinker, S. url  openurl
  Title COGNITION:Enhanced: Out of the Minds of Babes Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 283 Issue 5398 Pages 40-41  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.283.5398.40 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2956  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reddon, A.R.; Hurd, P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acting unilaterally: Why do animals with strongly lateralized brains behave differently than those with weakly lateralized brains? Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Bioscience Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages 383-387  
  Keywords Cerebral lateralization; Individual variation; Personality; Habenula; Dorsal-diencephalic conduction system  
  Abstract Cerebral lateralization was once thought to be unique to humans, but is now known to be widespread among the vertebrates. Lateralization appears to confer cognitive advantages upon those that possess it. Despite the taxonomic ubiquity and described advantages of lateralization, substantial individual variation exists in all species. Individual variation in cerebral lateralization may be tied to individual variation in behaviour and the selective forces that act to maintain variation in behaviour may also act to maintain variation in lateralization. The mechanisms linking individual variation in the strength of cerebral lateralization to individual variation in behaviour remain obscure. We propose here a general hypothesis which may help to explain this link. We suggest that individuals with strong and weak lateralizations behave differently because of differences in the ability of one hemisphere to inhibit the functions of the other in each type of brain organization. We also suggest a specific mechanism involving the asymmetric epithalamic nucleus, the habenula. We conclude by discussing some predictions and potential tests of our hypothesis.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1756-2392 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5417  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print