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Author Pérez-Barbería, F.J.; Shultz, S.; Dunbar, R.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for coevolution of sociality and relative brain size in three orders of mammals Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 61 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Pérez-Barbería2007 Serial 6221  
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Author Berger, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Carnivore-Livestock conflicts: effects of subsidized predator control and economic correlates on the sheep industry Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Conserv Biol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Berger2006 Serial 6448  
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Author Zohary, D.; Tchernov, E.; Horwitz, L.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of unconscious selection in the domestication of sheep and goats Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication J Zool Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 245 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Zohary1998 Serial 6240  
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Author Kruska, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of domestication on brain size and composition in the mink (Mustela vison) Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication J Zool Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 239 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Kruska1996 Serial 6234  
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Author Zentall, T.R.; Sutton, J.E.; Sherburne, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title True imitative learning in pigeons Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Psychol Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Zentall1996 Serial 6372  
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Author Rutberg, A.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Horse Fly Harassment and the Social Behavior of Feral Ponies Type Journal Article
  Year 1987 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 75 Issue 2 Pages 145-154  
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  Abstract Abstract Horse flies (Tabanidae) on and around feral ponies in harem groups were counted at Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland, U.S.A., between June and August 1985. Harem stallions attracted the most flies; adult mares showed intermediate fly numbers, while few flies landed on foals under any circumstances. The use of thermal and chemical cues by flies selecting a host may have helped create this disparity. When flies were abundant, ponies reduced spacing within the group. Ponies in larger groups suffered from fewer flies than ponies in smaller groups. There was, however, no evidence that ponies merged into larger groups in response to fly harassment, suggesting that biting flies play little role in structuring pony social organization.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
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  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1987.tb00648.x Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6417  
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Author Frank, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evolution of canine information processing under conditions of natural and artificial selection Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Z Tierpsychol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Frank1980 Serial 6243  
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Author Schino, G.; Aureli, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reciprocity in group-living animals: partner control versus partner choice Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biological Reviews Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 665-672  
  Keywords cooperation; reciprocity; partner control; partner choice; proximate mechanisms  
  Abstract ABSTRACT Reciprocity is probably the most debated of the evolutionary explanations for cooperation. Part of the confusion surrounding this debate stems from a failure to note that two different processes can result in reciprocity: partner control and partner choice. We suggest that the common observation that group-living animals direct their cooperative behaviours preferentially to those individuals from which they receive most cooperation is to be interpreted as the result of the sum of the two separate processes of partner control and partner choice. We review evidence that partner choice is the prevalent process in primates and propose explanations for this pattern. We make predictions that highlight the need for studies that separate the effects of partner control and partner choice in a broader variety of group-living taxa.  
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  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
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  ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1111/brv.12248 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6411  
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Author Broekhuis, F.; Madsen, E.K.; Klaassen, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Predators and pastoralists: how anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas influence carnivore space use and movement behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords cheetah; livestock; movement; human pressure; protected areas; space use  
  Abstract Abstract Across the globe, wildlife populations and their behaviours are negatively impacted by people. Protected areas are believed to be an antidote to increasing human pressures but even they are not immune to the impact of anthropogenic activities. Areas that have been set aside for the protection of wildlife therefore warrant more attention when investigating the impact of anthropogenic pressures on wildlife. We use cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus as a case study to explore how a large carnivore responds to anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas. Using GPS-collar data we investigate cheetah space use, both when moving and stationary, and movement parameters (speed and turn angles) in relation to human disturbance, distance to human settlement, livestock abundance and livestock site use inside wildlife areas. Space use was negatively influenced by human disturbance, resulting in habitat loss and fragmentation and potentially reducing landscape permeability between neighbouring wildlife areas. Cheetahs were also less likely to stop in areas where livestock numbers were high, but more likely to stop in areas that were frequently used by livestock. The latter could reflect that cheetahs are attracted to livestock however, cheetahs in the study area rarely predated on livestock. It is therefore more likely that areas that are frequently used by livestock attract wild herbivores, which in turn could influence cheetah space use. We did not find any effects of people and livestock on cheetahs? speed and turn angles which might be related to the resolution of the data. We found that cheetahs are sensitive to human pressures and we believe that they could be an indicator species for other large carnivores facing similar challenges. We suggest that further research is needed to determine the levels of anthropogenic pressures needed to maintain ecological integrity, especially inside wildlife areas.  
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  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1111/acv.12483 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6522  
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Author Strien, A.J.; Swaay, C.A.M.; Termaat, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Opportunistic citizen science data of animal species produce reliable estimates of distribution trends if analysed with occupancy models Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 50 Issue 6 Pages 1450-1458  
  Keywords Bayesian inference; citizen science; detection; distribution; hierarchical modelling; Jags; monitoring; site occupancy  
  Abstract Summary Many publications documenting large-scale trends in the distribution of species make use of opportunistic citizen data, that is, observations of species collected without standardized field protocol and without explicit sampling design. It is a challenge to achieve reliable estimates of distribution trends from them, because opportunistic citizen science data may suffer from changes in field efforts over time (observation bias), from incomplete and selective recording by observers (reporting bias) and from geographical bias. These, in addition to detection bias, may lead to spurious trends. We investigated whether occupancy models can correct for the observation, reporting and detection biases in opportunistic data. Occupancy models use detection/nondetection data and yield estimates of the percentage of occupied sites (occupancy) per year. These models take the imperfect detection of species into account. By correcting for detection bias, they may simultaneously correct for observation and reporting bias as well. We compared trends in occupancy (or distribution) of butterfly and dragonfly species derived from opportunistic data with those derived from standardized monitoring data. All data came from the same grid squares and years, in order to avoid any geographical bias in this comparison. Distribution trends in opportunistic and monitoring data were well-matched. Strong trends observed in monitoring data were rarely missed in opportunistic data. Synthesis and applications. Opportunistic data can be used for monitoring purposes if occupancy models are used for analysis. Occupancy models are able to control for the common biases encountered with opportunistic data, enabling species trends to be monitored for species groups and regions where it is not feasible to collect standardized data on a large scale. Opportunistic data may thus become an important source of information to track distribution trends in many groups of species.  
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  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1111/1365-2664.12158 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6437  
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