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Author Nakagawa, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A farewell to Bonferroni: the problems of low statistical power and publication bias Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Behav Ecol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Nakagawa2004 Serial 6294  
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Author Price, E.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioral aspects of animal domestication Type Journal Article
  Year 1984 Publication Q Rev Biol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 59 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Price1984 Serial 6239  
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Author Smaers, J.B.; Dechmann, D.K.N.; Goswami, A.; Soligo, C.; Safi, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparative analyses of evolutionary rates reveal different pathways to encephalization in bats, carnivorans, and primates Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 109 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Smaers2012 Serial 6238  
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Author Fagot, J.; Cook, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for large long-term memory capacities in baboons and pigeons and its implications for learning and the evolution of cognition Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 103 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Fagot2006 Serial 6278  
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Author Hampson, B.A.; Zabek, M.A.; Pollitt, C.C.; Nock, B. url  openurl
  Title Health and behaviour consequences of feral horse relocation Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Rangel. J. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 33 Issue 2 Pages 173-180  
  Keywords equine, GPS, movement, range.  
  Abstract Despite ongoing projects involving the breeding and release of equids into semi-wild and wild environments, insufficient information is available in the literature that describes strategies used by equids to adapt and survive in a novel environment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of naïve, feral Equus caballus (horse) mares to cope in a novel feral horse environment and investigate possible reasons why some may not survive this challenge. Four mares taken from a semi-arid desert environment remained in good health but significantly changed their movement behaviour pattern when surrounded by prime grazing habitat in a mesic temperate grassland. Three of the four mares captured from the prime grazing habitat and released in the semi-arid desert habitat died, apparently due to stress and/or starvation, within 8 weeks of release. The fourth mare survived 4 months but lost considerable weight.The group of mares relocated to the semi-arid desert environment had difficulty adapting to relocation and did not take up the movement behaviour strategy of local horses, which required long distance treks from a central water hole to distant feeding areas at least 15 km away. The movement behaviour, range use and health consequences of relocating equids may be of interest to wildlife ecologists, animal behaviourists and horse welfare groups. The observations may be used to guide those intending on relocating managed domestic and native horses to novel habitats.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6210  
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Author Heyes, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What's social about social learning? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication J Comp Psychol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 120 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Heyes2012 Serial 6228  
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Author Whiten, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imitation of the sequential structure of actions by chimpanzees Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication J Comp Psychol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Whiten1998 Serial 6291  
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Author Silanikove, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The physiological basis of adaptation in goats to harsh environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Small Rum Res Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Silanikove2000 Serial 6255  
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Author Sato, S.; Sako, S.; Maeda, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social licking patterns in cattle (<em>Bos taurus</em>): influence of environmental and social factors Type Journal Article
  Year 1991 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science  
  Volume 32 Issue 1 Pages 3-12  
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  Abstract To investigate the functions of social licking in cattle, four calves (one heifer and one steer in each of two herds), known to exhibit frequent social licking were observed continuously for 2 h before sunset for 13 days, using the focal animal sampling method. Calves were observed under various environmental conditions. Social licking significantly decreased on rainy days and tended to increase in a dirty barn and when food was restricted. Solicitation for social licking occurred not only from dominant animals of pairs but also from subordinates. Of the licking interactions, 31% occurred following solicitation, and these accounted for 39% of the total time spent licking. Following solicitation, 78% of social licking was oriented to the head and the neck regions that were inaccessible to self-licking animals. Unsolicited licking, however, was oriented not only to the head and the neck but also to the back and the rump regions, and these two latter regions were the major ones to receive licking. The effect of social relationships on social licking was investigated using least-squares analysis of variance. Social factors investigated were the difference of dominance values, the dominance-subordinance relationship, and kinship and familiarity; the sex of calves involved was also considered. Only familiarity had a significant effect on licking; exchanges of social licking increased with length of cohabitation. We suggest that social licking may have a cleaning effect, a tension-reducing effect and a bonding effect.  
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  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1016/S0168-1591(05)80158-3 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6409  
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Author Hoppitt, W.; Laland, K.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social processes influencing learning in animals: a review of the evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Adv Study Behav Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue Pages 105-165  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Hoppitt2008 Serial 6260  
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