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Author Krueger, Tom url  openurl
  Title Rinder- und Pferdebeweidung ist gut für die Natur Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Junge Wissenscahften Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 93 Issue Pages 28-35  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Rinder und Pferde werden in den Abruzzen das ganze Jahr auf großen Weiden gehalten. Dies fördert nachweislich den Artenreichtum, verbessert die Bodenqualität und trägt durch Kohlenstoffbindung zum Klimaschutz bei.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179 8529 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5614  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krapp, A.; Bachmann I.; Troxler, J. url  openurl
  Title Das Liegeverhalten von Pferden in Gruppenhaltung Type Conference Article
  Year 2008 Publication Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 150 Issue 4 Pages 186-187  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Erarbeitung eines Lösungsansatzes zur Optimierung
des eingeschränkten Liegeverhaltens rangniedriger
Pferde in Gruppenhaltung
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Das Liegeverhalten von Pferden in Gruppenhaltung 2008.pdf Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5306  
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Author Dvoinos, G.M.; Kharchenko, V.A.; Zviagnitsova, N.S. url  openurl
  Title The characteristics of the helminth community in the Turkmen kulan (Equus hemionus) Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Parazitologiia Abbreviated Journal Parazitologiia  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 246-251  
  Keywords Animals; Female; Helminthiasis/parasitology; Helminthiasis, Animal; Helminths/classification/*isolation & purification; Male; Perissodactyla/*parasitology; Turkmenistan; Ukraine  
  Abstract The helminth fauna of 24 kulans from Askaniya-Nova and Badkhyz was studied. 42 species of helminths were found, 34 of which belong to strongylids. The helminth species composition of kulan is similar to that of other species of horses. This is a result of an intensive parasite exchange in the historical past when numerous populations of different Equidae species made long seasonal migrations over steppe inter-river lands of Asia and grazed for some time on common pastures.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Russian Summary Language Original Title K kharakteristike soobshchestva gel'mintov turkmenskogo kulana (Equus hemionus)  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-1847 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:1408368 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2285  
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Author Geisbauer, G.; Griebel, U.; Schmid, A.;Timney, B url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brightness discrimination and neutral point Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Canadian Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Zool  
  Volume 82 Issue 4 Pages 660-670  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Abstract: Equine brightness discrimination ability and color discrimination were measured using a two-choice discrimination
task. Two Haflinger horses (Equus caballus L., 1758) were trained to discriminate 30 different shades of grey
varying from low to high relative brightness. Their ability to distinguish shades of grey was poor, with calculated
Weber fractions of 0.42 and 0.45. In addition, a “neutral point” test to determine the dimensionality of color vision
was carried out. Three hues of blue-green were tested versus a range of grey targets with brightnesses similar to those
of the blue-green targets. A neutral point was found at about 480 nm. Thus, we can conclude that horses possess
dichromatic color vision.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3649  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jansen, W.L.; van Alphen, M.; Berghout, M.; Everts, H.; Beynen, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An approach to assessment of the efficiency of dietary energy utilization by horses and ponies kept at riding schools Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication The Veterinary quarterly Abbreviated Journal Vet Q  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 195-198  
  Keywords *Animal Feed; Animal Husbandry; Animals; Body Weight; Dietary Fats; Dietary Fiber; *Energy Intake; *Energy Metabolism; Female; Horses/*physiology; Male  
  Abstract The ratio of calculated net energy intake (NEi) to calculate net energy requirement (NEr) might serve as an indicator of the efficiency of dietary energy utilization. The ratio was determined for 93 horses and ponies from 10 riding schools. For each animal with an assumed constant body weight, energy intake and energy requirements were assessed. On average, the estimated NEi was 14% greater than NEr. There was a significant, negative association between crude fibre intake and the NEi: NEr ratio. Earlier work indicated that extra fat intake may lead to over estimation of the calculated energy value of the ration due to changes in macronutrient digestibility. Dietary fat concentration was found to range from 32 to 52 g/kg dry matter (5 to 6 g/MJ net energy), but on the basis of digestibility trials this range in fat concentration is too small to significantly influence the NEi: NEr ratio. This study shows that assessment of the efficiency of dietary energy utilization under normal conditions, on the basis of the NEi: NEr ratio is fraught with uncertainty.  
  Address Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary, Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-2176 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:11765239 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1807  
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Author Yorke, J.; Adams, C.; Coady, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Therapeutic Value of Equine-Human Bonding in Recovery from Trauma Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Anthrozoös Abbreviated Journal Anthrozoös  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 17-30  
  Keywords  
  Abstract ABSTRACTAlthough most human-animal bond research has focused on relationships between humans and pets, animals have been used for therapeutic purposes in a variety of settings. Therapeutic riding programs have demonstrated a positive impact on quality of life for people with disabilities. Equine-facilitated psychotherapy is a promising approach to address self-esteem, depression, and other emotional or psychological problems. Restoration of the trauma victim's capacity for recovery hinges on provision of safety and development of trust, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. Thus, recovery from trauma represents an ideal context for exploring the therapeutic impact of equine?human relationships. The six participants in this study recognized that their pre-existing relationships with horses were therapeutic during recovering from trauma, defined as sufficient to have caused significant change in the participant's life. Semi-structured interviews and video-tapes of horse?rider interaction were used to describe the nature of the equine?human bond and its contribution to recovery from trauma. The equine?human bonds described by participants have parallels both with important elements of therapeutic alliances between professionals and clients and with the positive impact of relationship factors on client outcome.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Routledge Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0892-7936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.2752/089279308X274038 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6033  
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Author Boyd, R.; Richerson, P.J. url  openurl
  Title Why Culture is Common, but Cultural Evolution is Rare Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Proceedings of the British Academy Abbreviated Journal Proc Br Acad  
  Volume 88 Issue Pages 73-93  
  Keywords cultural distributed evolution primates  
  Abstract If culture is defined as variation acquired and maintained by social learning, then culture is common in nature. However, cumulative cultural evolution resulting in behaviors that no individual could invent on their own is limited to humans, song birds, and perhaps chimpanzees. Circumstantial evidence suggests that cumulative cultural evolution requires the capacity for observational learning. Here, we analyze two models the evolution of psychological capacities that allow cumulative cultural evolution. Both models suggest that the conditions which allow the evolution of such capacities when rare are much more stringent than the conditions which allow the maintenance of the capacities when common. This result follows from the fact that the assumed benefit of the capacities, cumulative cultural adaptation, cannot occur when the capacities are rare. These results suggest why such capacities may be rare in nature.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society/British Academy Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes http://www.proc.britac.ac.uk/cgi-bin/somsid.cgi?page=summaries/pba88#boyd Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4195  
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Author Warren-Smith, A.K.; McGreevy, P.D. url  openurl
  Title Preliminary investigations into the ethological relevance of round-pen (round-yard) training of horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 285-298  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Recently, training horses within round-pens has increased in popularity. Practitioners often maintain that the responses they elicit from horses are similar to signals used with senior conspecifics. To audit the responses of horses to conspecifics, 6 mare-young-horse dyads, this study introduced them to each other in a round-pen and videoed them for 8 min. These dyads spent significantly more time farther than 10 m apart than they did less than 1 m apart (p < .001). The time they spent less than 1 m apart decreased over the 8-min test period (p = .018). Mares occupied the center of the round-pen and chased youngsters for 0.73% of the test period (p < .001). Mares made all agonistic approaches (p < .001), and youngsters (p = .018) made all investigative approaches. Head lowering and licking-and-chewing were exhibited most when the youngsters were facing away from the mares (p < .001). The frequency of head lowering increased during the test period (p = .027), whereas the frequency of licking-and-chewing did not change. The results bring into question the popular interpretation and ethological relevance of equine responses commonly described in round-pen training and show that mares did not condition young horses to remain in close proximity to them.  
  Address Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
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  Notes Cited By (since 1996): 1; Export Date: 13 November 2008; Source: Scopus Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4657  
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Author Bartal, I.B.-A.; Decety, J.; Mason, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Empathy and Pro-Social Behavior in Rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1427-1430  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Whereas human pro-social behavior is often driven by empathic concern for another, it is unclear whether nonprimate mammals experience a similar motivational state. To test for empathically motivated pro-social behavior in rodents, we placed a free rat in an arena with a cagemate trapped in a restrainer. After several sessions, the free rat learned to intentionally and quickly open the restrainer and free the cagemate. Rats did not open empty or object-containing restrainers. They freed cagemates even when social contact was prevented. When liberating a cagemate was pitted against chocolate contained within a second restrainer, rats opened both restrainers and typically shared the chocolate. Thus, rats behave pro-socially in response to a conspecific&#65533;s distress, providing strong evidence for biological roots of empathically motivated helping behavior.  
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  Notes 10.1126/science.1210789 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5725  
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Author Gesquiere, L.R.; Learn, N.H.; Simao, M.C.M.; Onyango, P.O.; Alberts, S.C.; Altmann, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Life at the Top: Rank and Stress in Wild Male Baboons Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 333 Issue 6040 Pages 357-360  
  Keywords  
  Abstract In social hierarchies, dominant individuals experience reproductive and health benefits, but the costs of social dominance remain a topic of debate. Prevailing hypotheses predict that higher-ranking males experience higher testosterone and glucocorticoid (stress hormone) levels than lower-ranking males when hierarchies are unstable but not otherwise. In this long-term study of rank-related stress in a natural population of savannah baboons (Papio cynocephalus), high-ranking males had higher testosterone and lower glucocorticoid levels than other males, regardless of hierarchy stability. The singular exception was for the highest-ranking (alpha) males, who exhibited both high testosterone and high glucocorticoid levels. In particular, alpha males exhibited much higher stress hormone levels than second-ranking (beta) males, suggesting that being at the very top may be more costly than previously thought.  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1126/science.1207120 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5655  
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