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Author Pirault, P.; Danvy, S.; Verrier, E.; Leroy, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Genetic Structure and Gene Flows within Horses: A Genealogical Study at the French Population Scale Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages e61544  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Since horse breeds constitute populations submitted to variable and multiple outcrossing events, we analyzed the genetic structure and gene flows considering horses raised in France. We used genealogical data, with a reference population of 547,620 horses born in France between 2002 and 2011, grouped according to 55 breed origins. On average, individuals had 6.3 equivalent generations known. Considering different population levels, fixation index decreased from an overall species FIT of 1.37%, to an average of -0.07% when considering the 55 origins, showing that most horse breeds constitute populations without genetic structure. We illustrate the complexity of gene flows existing among horse breeds, a few populations being closed to foreign influence, most, however, being submitted to various levels of introgression. In particular, Thoroughbred and Arab breeds are largely used as introgression sources, since those two populations explain together 26% of founder origins within the overall horse population. When compared with molecular data, breeds with a small level of coancestry also showed low genetic distance; the gene pool of the breeds was probably impacted by their reproducer exchanges.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6215  
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Author Petersen, J.L.; Mickelson, J.R.; Cothran, E.G.; Andersson, L.S.; Axelsson, J.; Bailey, E.; Bannasch, D.; Binns, M.M.; Borges, A.S.; Brama, P.; da Câmara Machado, A.; Distl, O.; Felicetti, M.; Fox-Clipsham, L.; Graves, K.T.; Guérin, G.; Haase, B.; Hasegawa, T.; Hemmann, K.; Hill, E.W.; Leeb, T.; Lindgren, G.; Lohi, H.; Lopes, M.S.; McGivney, B.A.; Mikko, S.; Orr, N.; Penedo, M.C.T.; Piercy, R.J.; Raekallio, M.; Rieder, S.; Røed, K.H.; Silvestrelli, M.; Swinburne, J.; Tozaki, T.; Vaudin, M.; M. Wade, C.; McCue, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Genetic Diversity in the Modern Horse Illustrated from Genome-Wide SNP Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages e54997  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Horses were domesticated from the Eurasian steppes 5,000-6,000 years ago. Since then, the use of horses for transportation, warfare, and agriculture, as well as selection for desired traits and fitness, has resulted in diverse populations distributed across the world, many of which have become or are in the process of becoming formally organized into closed, breeding populations (breeds). This report describes the use of a genome-wide set of autosomal SNPs and 814 horses from 36 breeds to provide the first detailed description of equine breed diversity. FST calculations, parsimony, and distance analysis demonstrated relationships among the breeds that largely reflect geographic origins and known breed histories. Low levels of population divergence were observed between breeds that are relatively early on in the process of breed development, and between those with high levels of within-breed diversity, whether due to large population size, ongoing outcrossing, or large within-breed phenotypic diversity. Populations with low within-breed diversity included those which have experienced population bottlenecks, have been under intense selective pressure, or are closed populations with long breed histories. These results provide new insights into the relationships among and the diversity within breeds of horses. In addition these results will facilitate future genome-wide association studies and investigations into genomic targets of selection.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6214  
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Author Tennie, C.; Call, J.; Tomasello, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Untrained chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) fail to imitate novel actions Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Tennie2012 Serial 6289  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tennie, C.; Call, J.; Tomasello, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Untrained chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) fail to imitate novel actions Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Tennie2012 Serial 6369  
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Author Burn, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Vicious Cycle: A Cross-Sectional Study of Canine Tail-Chasing and Human Responses to It, Using a Free Video-Sharing Website Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One  
  Volume 6 Issue 11 Pages e26553  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Tail-chasing is widely celebrated as normal canine behaviour in cultural references. However, all previous scientific studies of tail-chasing or 'spinning' have comprised small clinical populations of dogs with neurological, compulsive or other pathological conditions; most were ultimately euthanased. Thus, there is great disparity between scientific and public information on tail-chasing. I gathered data on the first large (n = 400), non-clinical tail-chasing population, made possible through a vast, free, online video repository, YouTube[TM]. The demographics of this online population are described and discussed. Approximately one third of tail-chasing dogs showed clinical signs, including habitual (daily or 'all the time') or perseverative (difficult to distract) performance of the behaviour. These signs were observed across diverse breeds. Clinical signs appeared virtually unrecognised by the video owners and commenting viewers; laughter was recorded in 55% of videos, encouragement in 43%, and the commonest viewer descriptors were that the behaviour was 'funny' (46%) or 'cute' (42%). Habitual tail-chasers had 6.5+/-2.3 times the odds of being described as 'Stupid' than other dogs, and perseverative dogs were 6.8+/-2.1 times more frequently described as 'Funny' than distractible ones were. Compared with breed- and age-matched control videos, tail-chasing videos were significantly more often indoors and with a computer/television screen switched on. These findings highlight that tail-chasing is sometimes pathological, but can remain untreated, or even be encouraged, because of an assumption that it is 'normal' dog behaviour. The enormous viewing figures that YouTube[TM] attracts (mean+/-s.e. = 863+/-197 viewings per tail-chasing video) suggest that this perception will be further reinforced, without effective intervention.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6378  
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Author Briefer, E.F.; Haque, S.; Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Goats excel at learning and remembering a highly novel cognitive task Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Zoology Abbreviated Journal Front. Zool.  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 20  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The computational demands of sociality (maintaining group cohesion, reducing conflict) and ecological problems (extractive foraging, memorizing resource locations) are the main drivers proposed to explain the evolution cognition. Different predictions follow, about whether animals would preferentially learn new tasks socially or not, but the prevalent view today is that intelligent species should excel at social learning. However, the predictions were originally used to explain primate cognition, and studies of species with relatively smaller brains are rare. By contrast, domestication has often led to a decrease in brain size, which could affect cognition. In domestic animals, the relaxed selection pressures compared to a wild environment could have led to reduced social and physical cognition. Goats possess several features commonly associated with advanced cognition, such as successful colonization of new environments and complex fission-fusion societies. Here, we assessed goat social and physical cognition as well as long-term memory of a complex two-step foraging task (food box cognitive challenge), in order to investigate some of the main selection pressures thought to affect the evolution of ungulate cognition.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1742-9994 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2014 Serial 6376  
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Author Kaminski, J.; Call, J.; Tomasello, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Goats' behaviour in a competitive food paradigm: evidence for perspective taking? Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Behaviour Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 143 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Kaminski2006 Serial 6272  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kaminski, J.; Call, J.; Tomasello, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Goats' behaviour in a competitive food paradigm: evidence for perspective taking? Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Behaviour Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 143 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Kaminski2006 Serial 6352  
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Author van de Waal, E.; Bshary, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contact with human facilities appears to enhance technical skills in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Folia Primatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 81 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ van de Waal2010 Serial 6265  
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Author van de Waal, E.; Bshary, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Contact with human facilities appears to enhance technical skills in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Folia Primatol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 81 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ van de Waal2010 Serial 6345  
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