toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Evans, D. doi  openurl
  Title Welfare of the Racehorse During Exercise Training and Racing Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 181-201  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The welfare of horses in training for racing and competition can be compromised by errors of management of many processes. Lameness is usually identified, as the major problem facing horse trainers and high lameness rates in racehorses is a major welfare concern. Recent epidemiological studies have shed light on important environmental risk factors for lameness and catastrophic incidents during training and racing. Another important threat to the welfare of the athletic horse is failure of appropriate preparation of the horse for competition, resulting in earlier fatigue during a race. Fatigue during racing causes sub-optimal performance, increases the likelihood of injury and, in prolonged exercise contributes to exhaustion and even death. Failure to allow appropriate recovery periods after episodes of training and competition also contributes to a state of chronic fatigue. Trainers recognise that affected horses (or “stale” horses) often have mood disturbances and are reluctant to exercise. Continued excessive training and inadequate recovery (termed, over-training) can result in weight loss and poor performance that is not reversed by short-term recovery periods. In events involving prolonged exercise, the performance and welfare of the horse are compromised by inappropriate fluid balance before and during exercise. Failure to properly prepare and maintain fluid balance of endurance horses results in a severe threat to welfare. Pronounced dehydration and hyperthermia can result in exhaustion and death.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4381  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilson, R. doi  openurl
  Title Specific Welfare Problems Associated with Working Horses Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 203-218  
  Keywords  
  Abstract A brief review of the history and uses of workhorses is provided as well as numbers and distributions of working equines at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The problems of using the correct harness and correct alignment of horse and equipment through the harness are considered and care of the feet and especially the necessity of correct shoeing for both welfare and maximum work are discussed. The nutritional needs of working equines in terms of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins and the importance of good health and prevention and management of disease, are examined. Relationships between the animal and his owner or handler and some legal aspects of improving welfare are covered and it is concluded that education of these owners/handlers is essential for improving the welfare of working equids in developing countries.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4382  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krueger, K. doi  openurl
  Title Social Ecology of Horses Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2008 Publication Ecology of Social Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 195-206  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Horses (Equidae ) are believed to clearly demonstrate the links between ecology and social organization. Their social cognitive abilities enable them to succeed in many different environments, including those provided for them by humans, or the ones domestic horses encounter when escaping from their human care takers. Living in groups takes different shapes in equids. Their aggregation and group cohesion can be explained by Hamilton“s selfish herd theory. However, when an individual joins and to which group it joins appears to be an active individual decision depending on predation pressure, intra group harassment and resource availability. The latest research concerning the social knowledge horses display in eavesdropping experiments affirms the need for an extension of simple herd concepts in horses for a cognitive component. Horses obviously realize the social composition of their group and determine their own position in it. The horses exceedingly flexible social behavior demands for explanations about the cognitive mechanisms, which allow them to make individual decisions. ”Ecology conditions like those that favour the evolution of open behavioural programs sometimes also favour the evolution of the beginnings of consciousness, by favouring conscious choice. Or in other words, consciousness originates with the choice that are left open by open behavioural programs." Popper (1977)  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Verlag Place of Publication Heidelberg Editor j. Korb and J. Heinze  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Janis, C. doi  openurl
  Title An Evolutionary History of Browsing and Grazing Ungulates Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2007 Publication The Ecology of Browsing and Grazing Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 21-45  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Browsing (i.e., eating woody and non-woody dicotyledonous plants) and grazing (i.e., eating grass) are distinctively different types of feeding behaviour among ungulates today. Ungulates with different diets have different morphologies (both craniodental ones and in aspects of the digestive system) and physiologies, although some of these differences are merely related to body size, as grazers are usually larger than browsers. There is also a difference in the foraging behaviour in terms of the relationship between resource abundance and intake rate, which is linear in browsers but asymptotic in grazers. The spatial distribution of the food resource is also different for the different types of herbage, browse being more patchily distributed than grass, and thus browsers and grazers are likely to have a very different perception of food resources in any given ecosystem (see Gordon 2003, for review).  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4392  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lefebvre, L.; Giraldeau, L.-A. isbn  openurl
  Title Is social learning an adaptive specialisation? Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1996 Publication Social learning in animals: The root of culture Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 107-128  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Academic Press. Place of Publication San Diego Editor Heyes, C. M. ;B. G. Galef B. G..Jr.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0122739651 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4415  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sturm, P. openurl 
  Title Brauchen wir Training und Wettkampf? Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1914 Publication Athletik – Jahrbuch 1914 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Selbstverlag der Deutschen Sport-Behörde für Athletik Place of Publication Berlin Editor  
  Language German Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Herausgegeben von der Deutschen Sport-Behörde für Athletik, zehnter Jahrgang, Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4422  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dyer, F. C. openurl 
  Title Individual cognition and group movement: insights from social insects. Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2000 Publication Group Movement in Social Primates and Other Animals: Patterns, Processes, and Cognitive Implications. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor Garber, P.;Boinski, S.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4425  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moss, C.J.; Poole, J.H. isbn  openurl
  Title Relationships and social structure in African elephants. Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1983 Publication Primate social relationships: an integrated approach. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor Hinde, R.A.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0632009992 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4426  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Connor, R.C.; Wells, R.S.; Mann, J.; Read,A.J. isbn  openurl
  Title The bottlenose dolphin: Social relationships in a fission-fusion society. Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2000 Publication Cetacean Societies: Field Studies of Dolphins and Whales. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 91-126  
  Keywords cetacean social behavior, male alliance formation, most cetacean species, platanistid river dolphins, cetacean sociality, strategies and social bonds, female cetaceans, many cetologists, most mysticetes, sperm whale calves, passive fishing nets, variant whistles, historical whaling records, cetacean systematics, stable matrilineal groups, peak calving season, suction cup tags, mutualistic groups, cetacean vocalizations, focal animal studies, larger odontocetes, predictive signaling, individual cetaceans, sperm whale clicks, resident killer whales  
  Abstract Book Description

“Part review, part testament to extraordinary dedication, and part call to get involved, Cetacean Societies highlights the achievements of behavioral ecologists inspired by the challenges of cetaceans and committed to the exploration of a new world.”-from the preface by Richard Wrangham

Long-lived, slow to reproduce, and often hidden beneath the water's surface, whales and dolphins (cetaceans) have remained elusive subjects for scientific study even though they have fascinated humans for centuries. Until recently, much of what we knew about cetaceans came from commercial sources such as whalers and trainers for dolphin acts. Innovative research methods and persistent efforts, however, have begun to penetrate the depths to reveal tantalizing glimpses of the lives of these mammals in their natural habitats.

Cetacean Societies presents the first comprehensive synthesis and review of these new studies. Groups of chapters focus on the history of cetacean behavioral research and methodology; state-of-the-art reviews of information on four of the most-studied species: bottlenose dolphins, killer whales, sperm whales, and humpback whales; and summaries of major topics, including group living, male and female reproductive strategies, communication, and conservation drawn from comparative research on a wide range of species.

Written by some of the world's leading cetacean scientists, this landmark volume will benefit not just students of cetology but also researchers in other areas of behavioral and conservation ecology as well as anyone with a serious interest in the world of whales and dolphins.

Contributors are Robin Baird, Phillip Clapham, Jenny Christal, Richard Connor, Janet Mann, Andrew Read, Randall Reeves, Amy Samuels, Peter Tyack, Linda Weilgart, Hal Whitehead, Randall S. Wells, and Richard Wrangham.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Chicago Press Place of Publication Chicago Editor Mann, J.;Connor, R.C.; Tyack, P.L.;Whitehead, H.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0226503417 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4427  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Byrne, Richard; Whiten, Andrew isbn  openurl
  Title The machiavellian intelligence hypothesis:Editorial Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1988 Publication Machiavellian Intelligence Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Univ Press Place of Publication Oxford Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 0-19-852175-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4430  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print