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Author Kamil, A.C. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title On the Proper Definition of Cognitive Ethology Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-28  
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  Abstract Summary The last 20-30 years have seen two `scientific revolutions' in the study of animal behavior: the cognitive revolution that originated in psychology, and the Darwinian, behavioral ecology revolution that originated in biology. Among psychologists, the cognitive revolution has had enormous impact. Similarly, among biologists, the Darwinian revolution has had enormous impact. The major theme of this chapter is that these two scientific research programs need to be combined into a single approach, simultaneously cognitive and Darwinian, and that this single approach is most appropriately called cognitive ethology.  
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  Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil  
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  ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4202  
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Author Giraldeau, Luc-Alain url  isbn
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  Title The ecology of information use Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1997 Publication Behavioural ecology : an evolutionary approach Abbreviated Journal  
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  Publisher Blackwell Science Place of Publication Cambridge, Mass. Editor Krebs, J.R.; Davies, N.B.  
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  ISSN ISBN 0865427313 9780865427310 Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ 35114973 Serial 4277  
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Author unknown openurl 
  Title Personality and Personality Disorders Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 1997 Publication Behavioural Genetics Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 195-207  
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  Publisher W. H. Freeman and Company Place of Publication New York Editor Plomin, R.; DeFries, J.C.; McClearn, G.E.;Rutter, M.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 3  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4283  
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Author Waran, N.; Leadon, D.; Friend, T. doi  openurl
  Title The Effects of Transportation on the Welfare of Horses Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 125-150  
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  Abstract Typically, horses are transported many times in their lives, this is with the exception of the horses reared for meat. Although difficult to estimate the extent of the movement of horses worldwide, it is clear that this is a substantial and growing practice. Until recently research into the effects of the different methods of transport (road, sea and air), was limited. This may have been because it was presumed that, because of their financial and emotional value, horses experience higher standards of transportation, than other large domestic animals. The process of transporting horses includes a range of potential Stressors, and there is scientific evidence that many of these can impact upon the welfare of the horse. In this chapter, we examine the effects of the different modes used to transport horses and we offer suggestions where possible for improvements in this practice.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4374  
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Author Goodwin, D. doi  openurl
  Title Horse Behaviour: Evolution, Domestication and Feralisation Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-18  
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  Abstract The evolution of the horse began some 65 million years ago. The horse"s survival has depended on adapative behaviour patterns that enabled it to exploit a diverse range of habitats, to successfully rear its young and to avoid predation. Domestication took place relatively recently in evolutionary time and the adaptability of equine behaviour has allowed it to exploit a variety of domestic environments. Though there are benefits associated with the domestic environment, including provision of food, shelter and protection from predators, there are also costs. These include restriction of movement, social interaction, reproductive success and maternal behaviour. Many aspects of domestication conflict with the adaptive behaviour of the horse and may affect its welfare through the frustration of highly motivated behaviour patterns. Horse behaviour appears little changed by domestication, as evidenced by the reproductive success of feral horse populations around the world.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4375  
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Author Casey, R. doi  openurl
  Title Clinical Problems Associated with the Intensive Management of Performance Horses Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 19-44  
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  Abstract The physical as well as the behavioural requirements of the horse changed little through the process of domestication. This means that horses kept within an intensively housed environment and used for performance, physically and behaviourally are susceptible to specific clinical conditions, injuries and diseases. In this chapter, physiological and clinical problems such as those causing pain related behaviours and head shaking are discussed. The most commonly associated problems with horses kept in intensive housing conditions or used in specific competitive disciplines are highlighted. Despite the increasing amount of information about injury and disease in the horse, there is little research relating such problems to the situations performance horses have to cope with. This is particularly the case with pain, whose recognition of pain amongst professionals is still variable and often subjective and not widely recognised as a cause of behavioural change.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4376  
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Author Davidson, N.; Harris, P. doi  openurl
  Title Nutrition and Welfare Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 45-76  
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  Abstract The horse is a social species living in herds and spending the majority of its time roaming and foraging in a diverse and seasonally-varying environment. As a non-ruminant herbivore it is well suited to a high fibre, low starch diet. Domestication has resulted in a number of benefits to the horse, reflected in its continued prevalence and apparently increased life expectancy, but it has not been without its price. Especially in developed countries, horses kept for leisure purposes (which includes all competition and racing horses) are often confined, possibly away from conspecifics, within a stable for a large proportion of the day. Due to increased energy requirements many horses now receive one to two large meals a day, consisting of feedstuffs with a low water content and often a radically different nutritional profile from the diet that they would be able or would choose to select in the wild. These modern practices have benefits but also potential disadvantages to the horse both nutritionally and behaviourally which may have an impact on welfare. This chapter highlights areas where dietary imbalances or inappropriate feeding practices may potentially have an adverse effect on welfare and gives suggestions on how these may be ameliorated.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4377  
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Author Mills, D.; Clarke, A. doi  openurl
  Title Housing, Management and Welfare Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 77-97  
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  Abstract Horses tend to be housed in loose boxes, stalls, barns and shelters for ease of management, however these systems present several possible threats to equine health and welfare. These systems are reviewed together with the concerns they raise. A common system for the evaluation of the welfare of contained animals focuses on the provision of five freedoms. These are freedom from hunger, thirst and malnutrition, from discomfort, from pain, injury and disease, from fear and distress and to express most normal patterns of behaviour. This approach is used to assess the ways in which horse welfare may be compromised by certain housing practices and management regimes. Recommendations as to how these problems can be resolved and to promote good practice are provided.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4378  
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Author Cooper, J.; McGreevy, P. doi  openurl
  Title Stereotypic Behaviour in the Stabled Horse: Causes, Effects and Prevention without Compromising Horse Welfare Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 99-124  
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  Abstract Apparently functionless, repetitive behaviour in horses, such as weaving or crib-biting has been difficult to explain for behavioural scientists, horse owners and veterinarians alike. Traditionally activities such as these have been classed amongst the broad descriptor of undesirable stable vices and treatment has centred on prevention of the behaviours per se rather than addressing their underlying causes. In contrast, welfare scientists have described such activities as apparently abnormal stereotypics, claiming they are indicative of poor welfare, citing negative emotions such as boredom, frustration or aversion in the stable environment and even suggesting prevention of the activities alone can lead to increased distress. Our understanding of equine stereotypics has advanced significantly in recent years with epidemiological, developmental and experimental studies identifying those factors closely associated with the performance of stereotypics in stabled horses. These have allowed the development of new treatments based on removing the causal factors, improving the horses“ social and nutritional environment, re-training of horses and their owners and redirection of the activities to less harmful forms. Repetitive activities conventionally seen as undesirable responses to the stable environment, their causal basis and the effectiveness of different approaches to treatment are discussed, both in terms of reducing the behaviour and improving the horse”s quality of life.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4379  
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Author Waran, N.; McGreevy, P.; Casey, R. doi  openurl
  Title Training Methods and Horse Welfare Type (up) Book Chapter
  Year 2002 Publication The Welfare of Horses Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 151-180  
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  Abstract Many aspects of horse care and handling are based upon convenience and traditional practices. Many of these methods of management and practice do not take into account the natural behaviour of horses. This is despite the belief that although domestic horses are probably more docile, stronger, faster growing and faster moving than their ancestors, they are unlikely to have lost any natural behaviours. The performance or sport horse is expected to perform a wide variety of movements and tasks, some of which are unnatural or exaggerated and most of which must be learned. The term “training” is commonly used to describe the processes whereby the human handler introduces the horse to new situations and associations. Performance horses are often required to tolerate stimuli that are innately aversive or threatening, such as having a person on their backs. They are also trained to respond to a stimulus with often unnatural or over-emphasised behaviour, such as some of the dressage movements. Effective and humane training requires an understanding of the processes underlying behaviour. These include knowledge of behaviour under natural conditions, learning processes, the influence of early experience and motivational forces. Horses differ from the other main companion animal species, namely cats and dogs, in that they are a prey species. They most commonly flee from dangerous and painful situations. Horses readily learn to avoid potentially threatening situations and if their attempts to avoid associated stimuli are prevented, they will often exhibit problem behaviours. In this chapter the history of horse training, the application of learning theory and a knowledge of equine behaviour to training, and innovative training methods are all considered.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4380  
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