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Author de Waal, F. B.
Title Dominance “style” and primate social organization. Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1989 Publication Comparative Socioecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 243-263
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Publisher Blackwell Science Place of Publication Editor Standen, V.; Foley, R. A.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0632023615 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 2864
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Author Dyer, F.C.
Title Spatial Cognition: Lessons from Central-place Foraging Insects Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 119-154
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Abstract Summary Spatial orientation has played an extremely important role in the development of ideas about the behavioral capacities of animals. Indeed, as the modern scientific study of animal behavior emerged from its roots in zoology and experimental psychology, studies of spatial orientation figured in the work of many of the pioneering researchers, including Tinbergen (), von ), Watson () and .
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Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2913
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Author Smith, W.J.
Title Cognitive Implications of an Information-sharing Model of Animal Communication Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 227-243
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Abstract Summary In social communication, one animal signals and another responds. Several cognitive steps are involved as the second animal selects its responses; these steps can be described as follows in terms of an informational model. First, the responding individual must evaluate the information made available by the signaling on the basis of other information, available from sources contextual to the signal. Second, the respondent must fit all of the relevant information into patterns generated from recall of past events (conscious recall is not generally required; pattern fitting is a fundamental skill). Third, conditional predictions must be made; and fourth, the individual must test and modify any of these predictions for which significant consequences exist. Many vertebrate animals appear to respond to signaling with considerable flexibility. Communicative events are thus complex but are by no means intractable. Indeed, communication provides us with excellent opportunities to investigate animal cognition.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2914
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Author Beer, C.G.
Title Varying Views of Animal and Human Cognition Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 435-456
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Abstract Summary In this chapter I want to stand back from the splendid empirical work on animal cognitive capacities that is the focus of this book, and look at the broader context of cognitive concerns within which the work can be viewed. Indeed even the term `cognitive ethology' currently connotes and denotes more than is represented here, as other collections of articles, such as and , exemplify. I include the current descendants of behavioristic learning theory, evolutionary epistemology, evolutionary psychology and the recent comparative turn that has been taken in cognitive science. These several approaches, despite their considerable overlap, often appear independent and even ignorant of one another. Like the proverbial blind men feeling the hide of an elephant, they touch hands from time to time, yet collectively have only a piecemeal and distributed understanding of the shape of the whole. Although each approach may indeed need the space to work out its own conceptual and methodological preoccupations without confounding interference from other views, a utopian spirit envisages an ultimate coming together, a more comprehensive realization of the synthetic approach to animal cognition that is this book's theme.
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Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2915
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Author Pain, S.
Title Inner Representations and Signs in Animals Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 2007 Publication Introduction to Biosemiotics Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 409-455
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Abstract At the beginning of the twentieth century, behaviourists like John B. Watson (1878-1958) changed the focus of attention from the inside of the brain (mentalism and introspection then being the main trend in psychology at the time) to the outside (Watson, 1913). They believed that we could learn nearly everything about animals and humans by studying their performance in learning experiments, and this was both measurable and verifiable. Today in the first decade of the twenty-first century, there has been a return to the inside. The neurosciences seek physiological explanations and connections between external behaviour and the neural mechanisms within the nervous system. With the revolution in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology researchers are now able to visually represent neural activity. Other researchers have developed mathematical models and programs to visualise the patterns created in the periphery prior to central integration The author in this paper would like to distinguish these descriptive forms of representation from actual representations, i.e., those of which the animal is actually aware or conscious. Why does an animal sometimes make perceptual mistakes? (Case Study I “The Turtle and the Plastic Bag”). Is there more to dispositions? (Case Study II: “Taking Representation for a Walk. Argos and the Fake Daniel Dennett”). How is prey represented to an animal? (Case Study III “Representation of Prey in the Jellyfish/Herring Predator-Prey Dyad”). Does a simple animal feel pain or suffer? (Case Study IV: A Can of Worms. The Earthworm as Bait) It will be argued on the basis of contemporary biosemiotic research that animals (including both vertebrates and invertebrates) represent environmental information internally, and these representations can be subdivided into i.) primary or peripheral representation and ii.) central representation which are quantitative and qualitative respectively. Sensory information is conveyed via signals, these are received as stimuli then transduced into internal signals (see Theoretical Framework). At this stage the animal is not aware of the quality of the information as it has not yet been integrated or processed in a ganglionic complex. One can describe the properties of this pre-integrated information as quantitative and syntactical i.e., spatial and temporal ordering of incoming signals and their relations. The sign which is the smallest unit of qualitative representation arises only after integration of information from two or more discrete sensory modalities. These findings have repercussions for current models of animal learning and behaviour, especially in lower invertebrates (the principal subject of this paper); they also challenge the development of robots based on so-called simple systems
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3102
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Author Scheumann, M.; Rabesandratana, A.; Zimmermann, E.
Title Predation, Communication, and Cognition in Lemurs Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 2007 Publication Primate Anti-Predator Strategies Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 100-126
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Abstract Predation represents an important selective force shaping the evolution of primate behavior. Primates confronted with predators have evolved various strategies to minimize the probability of being eaten. Predation risk and hunting styles of predators should have selected for communicative and cognitive abilities linked to socioecology and life history. As studies on several socially cohesive mammals indicate, the study of anti-predator behavior represents an important tool for gaining insight into cognition, e.g., to understand how animals classify objects and events in the world around them (e.g., marmots: Blumstein, 1999; vervet monkeys: Seyfarth et al., 1980; Diana monkeys: Zuberbhler, 2000; suricates: Manser et al., 2002).
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3103
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Author Houpt, K.A.
Title Learning in horses. Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1995 Publication The thinking horse. Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 12-17
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Publisher Equine Research Centre Place of Publication Guelph, Canada Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3585
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Author unknown
Title Horse – Perception – Vision Type (up) Book Chapter
Year Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
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Abstract Horses have been described as being among the

most perceptive of animals.1 By studying the

sensory perception of horses, we gain valuable

insights into their behavior. The differences

between human and equine perceptions of the

external environment can be explained by the

differences in their sensory structures. The horses

adept perception has allowed it to be constantly

aware of changes occurring in its surroundings

and has played a pivotal role in the success of this

species. An appreciation and understanding of

the horses well-developed sensory system are

valuable tools, particularly when attempting to

understand distinctive aspects of equine behavior.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3645
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Author Wingfield, J. C.,; Ramenofsky, M.
Title Hormones and the behavioral ecology of stress. Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1999 Publication Stress physiology in animals. Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-51
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Publisher Sheffield Academic Press Place of Publication Sheffield, United Kingdom Editor Balm, P. H. M.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4071
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Author Laland, K. N.; Richerson, P. J.; Boyd, R.
Title Developing a theory of animal social learning. Type (up) Book Chapter
Year 1996 Publication Social learning in animals: the roots of culture. Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 129-154
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Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication San Diego, California Editor Heyes, C. M.;Galef,B. G. J.
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ home Serial 4093
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