|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Ernst, K.; Puppe, B.; Schon, P.C.; Manteuffel, G.
Title (up) A complex automatic feeding system for pigs aimed to induce successful behavioural coping by cognitive adaptation Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume 91 Issue 3-4 Pages 205-218
Keywords Learning; Cognition; Reward; Welfare; Pig
Abstract In modern intensive husbandry systems there is an increasing tendency for animals to interact with technical equipment. If the animal-technology interface is well-designed this may improve animal welfare by offering challenges for cognitive adaptation. Here a system and its application is presented that acoustically calls individual pigs out of a group (n = 8) to a feeding station. In three different learning phases, the computer-controlled “call-feeding-station” (CFS) trained the animals to recognize a specific acoustic signal as a summons for food, using a combination of classical and operant conditioning techniques. The experimental group's stall contained four CFSs, at each of which one animal at a time was able to feed. When an animal had learned to discriminate and recognize its individual acoustic signal it had to localize the particular CFS that was calling and to enter inside it. Then, it received a portion of feed, the amount of which was adapted to the respective age of the animals. Each animal was called at several, unpredictable times each day and the computer programme ensured that the total feed supply was sufficient for each animal. In the last phase of the experiment the animals, in addition, had to press a button with an increasing fixed ratio for the delivery of feed. It was demonstrated that the pigs were able to adapt quickly to the CFSs. Although they were challenged over 12 h daily by requirements of attention, sensory localization and motor efforts to gain comparatively low amounts of feed, they performed well and reached fairly constant success rates between 90 and 95% and short delays between 14 and 16 s between a summons and the food release in the last phase of the experiment. The weight gain during the experiment was the same as in a conventionally fed control group (n = 8). We therefore conclude that CFSs present a positive challenge to the animals with no negative effects on performance but with a potentially beneficial role for welfare and against boredom. The system is also a suitable experimental platform for research on the effects of successful adaptation by rewarded cognitive processes in pigs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2898
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brosnan, S.F.; de Waal, F.B.M.
Title (up) A concept of value during experimental exchange in brown capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Folia primatologica; international journal of primatology Abbreviated Journal Folia Primatol (Basel)
Volume 75 Issue 5 Pages 317-330
Keywords Animals; Cebus/*psychology; *Choice Behavior; Female; Food Preferences; *Learning; Male; Sex Factors; Statistics, Nonparametric; *Token Economy; Video Recording
Abstract We evaluated the response of brown capuchin monkeys to two differentially valued tokens in an experimental exchange situation akin to a simple barter. Monkeys were given a series of three tests to evaluate their ability to associate tokens with food, then their responses were examined in a barter situation in which tokens were either limited or unlimited. Capuchins did not perform barter in the typical sense, returning the tokens which were associated with the reward. However, females, but not males, showed a different response, preferring the higher-value token. This may indicate that they learned to prefer one token over the other rather than to associate the tokens with their specific rewards. This sex difference parallels previous findings of greater reciprocity in female brown capuchins than in males.
Address Living Links Center, Emory University, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 N. Gatewood Drive, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. sbrosna@emory.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0015-5713 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15486443 Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 170
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hinde, R.A.
Title (up) A conceptural framework Type Book Chapter
Year 1983 Publication Primate Social Relationships Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Sinauer, Sunderland Place of Publication Massechusetts Editor Hinde, R.A
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 818
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Steinhoff, H.J.
Title (up) A continuous wave laser T-jump apparatus and its application to chemical reactions in hemoglobin single crystals Type Journal Article
Year 1988 Publication Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods Abbreviated Journal J Biochem Biophys Methods
Volume 15 Issue 6 Pages 319-330
Keywords Animals; Chemistry; Crystallization; *Heat; *Hemoglobins; Horses/blood; *Lasers; Methemoglobin; Solutions; Thermodynamics; Thiocyanates
Abstract A laser temperature jump apparatus is constructed where the T-jump is achieved by means of the direct absorption of continuous laser radiation of low intensity by a solid sample. The final temperature in the irradiated volume element is reached when the absorbed radiation power equals the dissipation of heat by heat conduction. The time range from the beginning of irradiation to the stationary state depends on the geometry of the irradiated volume element and is less than 10 ms. The heating laser beam is simultaneously used to detect the relaxation to the new chemical equilibrium in the sample. Relaxation processes with relaxation rates between 10(2) s-1 and less than 10(-3) s-1 on samples with volumes less than 10(-3) mm3 may be investigated using this T-jump method. One application of this method is the determination of reaction rates of ligand reactions in hemoglobin single crystals. Rate constants obtained for the reaction of thiocyanate with crystallized horse methemoglobin are presented.
Address Institut fur Biophysik, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, F.R.G
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-022X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:3379245 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3804
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ryder, O. A.; Wedemeyer, E. A.
Title (up) A cooperative breeding programme for the mongolian wild horse Equus Przewalski in the United States Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Abbreviated Journal Biol. Cons.
Volume 22 Issue Pages 259-271
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes from Professor Hans Klingels Equine Reference List Approved no
Call Number Serial 1540
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Forkman, B.; Boissy, A.; Meunier-Salaün, M.-C.; Canali, E.; Jones, R.B.
Title (up) A critical review of fear tests used on cattle, pigs, sheep, poultry and horses Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Behav.
Volume 92 Issue 3 Pages 340-374
Keywords Fear; Cattle; Sheep; Pig; Poultry; Horse; Open field; Tonic immobility; Novel object
Abstract FORKMAN, B., A., BOISSY, M.-C., SALAUN, E., CANALI, AND R.B., JONES. A critical review of fear tests used on cattle, pigs, sheep, poultry and horses. PHYSIOL. BEHAV. 000-000, 2007. Fear is arguably the most commonly investigated emotion in domestic animals. In the current review we attempt to establish the level of repeatability and validity found for fear tests used on cattle, pigs, sheep and goats, poultry and horses. We focus the review on the three most common types of fear tests: the arena test (open field), the novel object test, and the restraint test. For some tests, e.g. tonic immobility in poultry, there is a good and broad literature on factors that affect the outcome of the test, the validity of the test and its age dependency. However, there are comparatively few of these well defined and validated tests and what is especially missing for most tests is information on the robustness, i.e., what aspects can be changed without affecting the validity of the tests. The relative absence of standardized tests hampers the development of applied ethology as a science.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4811
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bering, J.M.
Title (up) A critical review of the “enculturation hypothesis”: the effects of human rearing on great ape social cognition Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.
Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages 201-212
Keywords Animals; *Cognition; *Culture; Hominidae/*psychology; Humans; *Imitative Behavior; Imprinting (Psychology); *Intention; Macaca; Psychological Theory; Social Behavior; *Social Environment; Species Specificity
Abstract Numerous investigators have argued that early ontogenetic immersion in sociocultural environments facilitates cognitive developmental change in human-reared great apes more characteristic of Homo sapiens than of their own species. Such revamping of core, species-typical psychological systems might be manifest, according to this argument, in the emergence of mental representational competencies, a set of social cognitive skills theoretically consigned to humans alone. Human-reared great apes' capacity to engage in “true imitation,” in which both the means and ends of demonstrated actions are reproduced with fairly high rates of fidelity, and laboratory great apes' failure to do so, has frequently been interpreted as reflecting an emergent understanding of intentionality in the former. Although this epigenetic model of the effects of enculturation on social cognitive systems may be well-founded and theoretically justified in the biological literature, alternative models stressing behavioral as opposed to representational change have been largely overlooked. Here I review some of the controversy surrounding enculturation in great apes, and present an alternative nonmentalistic version of the enculturation hypothesis that can also account for enhanced imitative performance on object-oriented problem-solving tasks in human-reared animals.
Address Department of Psychology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. jbering@uark.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1435-9448 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15004739 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2543
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bolhuis, J.J.; Macphail, E.M.
Title (up) A critique of the neuroecology of learning and memory Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Trends in Cognitive Sciences Abbreviated Journal Trends. Cognit. Sci.
Volume 5 Issue 10 Pages 426-433
Keywords
Abstract Recent years have seen the emergence of neuroecology, the study of the neural mechanisms of behaviour guided by functional and evolutionary principles. This research has been of enormous value for our understanding of the evolution of brain- and species-specific behaviour. However, we question the validity of the neuroecological approach when applied to the analysis of learning and memory, given its arbitrary assumption that different [`]problems' engage different memory mechanisms. Differences in memory-based performance in [`]natural' tasks do not prove differences in memory capacity; similarly, differences in the use of memory in the natural environment do not provide a sound basis for expecting differences in anatomical structures that subserve learning and memory. This critique is illustrated with examples taken from the study of the neurobiology of food storing and song learning in birds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1364-6613 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4742
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Luescher, U.A.; McKeown, D.B.; Dean, H.
Title (up) A cross-sectional study on compulsive behaviour (stable vices) in horses Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Equine veterinary journal. Supplement Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 27 Pages 14-18
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Cited By (since 1996): 22; Export Date: 21 October 2008 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4527
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Devinsky, O.; Boesch, J.M.; Cerda-Gonzalez, S.; Coffey, B.; Davis, K.; Friedman, D.; Hainline, B.; Houpt, K.; Lieberman, D.; Perry, P.; Prüss, H.; Samuels, M.A.; Small, G.W.; Volk, H.; Summerfield, A.; Vite, C.; Wisniewski, T.; Natterson-Horowitz, B.
Title (up) A cross-species approach to disorders affecting brain and behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Reviews Neurology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Structural and functional elements of biological systems are highly conserved across vertebrates. Many neurological and psychiatric conditions affect both humans and animals. A cross-species approach to the study of brain and behaviour can advance our understanding of human disorders via the identification of unrecognized natural models of spontaneous disorders, thus revealing novel factors that increase vulnerability or resilience, and via the assessment of potential therapies. Moreover, diagnostic and therapeutic advances in human neurology and psychiatry can often be adapted for veterinary patients. However, clinical and research collaborations between physicians and veterinarians remain limited, leaving this wealth of comparative information largely untapped. Here, we review pain, cognitive decline syndromes, epilepsy, anxiety and compulsions, autoimmune and infectious encephalitides and mismatch disorders across a range of animal species, looking for novel insights with translational potential. This comparative perspective can help generate novel hypotheses, expand and improve clinical trials and identify natural animal models of disease resistance and vulnerability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1759-4766 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Devinsky2018 Serial 6420
Permanent link to this record