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Author M, E.; östl,.; Messmann, S.; Bagu, E.; Robia, C.; Palme, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurement of Glucocorticoid Metabolite Concentrations in Faeces of Domestic Livestock Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series A Abbreviated Journal J. Vet. Med. A  
  Volume 46 Issue 10 Pages 621-631  
  Keywords  
  Abstract After 14C-labelled cortisol infusion in ponies and pigs, faecal samples were collected. Extraction of 0.5 g faeces with 5 ml 80–90 % methanol yielded the highest radioactivity in the supernatant. Most of the metabolites were ether soluble. After high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the presence of immunoreactive metabolites was demonstrated by measuring each HPLC fraction using enzyme immunoassays for cortisol, corticosterone and 11-oxoaetiocholanolone. Only the assay for 11-oxoaetiocholanolone revealed peaks with co-eluting radioactivity. For biological validation of the test system, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and dexamethasone were injected intravenously successively in both species (n = 6). Cortisol concentration in blood and the 11-oxoaetiocholanolone immunoreactive substances in faeces were determined. In horse faeces, basal values of 2.3–35.2 nmol/kg were measured. After ACTH administration, an increase (more than 200 % above basal values) of these metabolites was seen about 1 day after ACTH administration. After dexamethasone injection the levels decreased, reaching minimum concentrations 2 days after administration. In pigs, an increase in these metabolites was measured in only three animals after ACTH; dexamethasone did not cause a decrease. The stability of the samples after defecation was tested by storing samples from cows, horses and pigs at room temperature. It was shown that there was a significant increase in the concentration of measured cortisol metabolites in bovine, equine and porcine faeces after storage for 1 h, 4 h and 24 h, respectively. In frozen samples this effect was diminished after thawing samples at 40°C; thawing the samples at 95°C prevented an increase in immunoreactive substances.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Blackwell Science, Ltd Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-0442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6043  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sebastiano, M.; Eens, M.; Angelier, F.; Pineau, K.; Chastel, O.; Costantini, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Corticosterone, inflammation, immune status and telomere length in frigatebird nestlings facing a severe herpesvirus infection Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal Conserv. Physiol.  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages cow073-cow073  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Herpesvirus outbreaks are common in natural animal populations, but little is known about factors that favour the infection and its consequences for the organism. In this study, we examined the pathophysiological consequences of a disease probably attributable to herpesvirus infection for several markers of immune function, corticosterone, telomere length and inflammation. In addition, we assessed whether any markers used in this study might be associated with the occurrence of visible clinical signs of the disease and its impact on short-term survival perspectives. To address our questions, in spring 2015, we collected blood samples from nestlings of the magnificent frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) that were free of any clinical signs or showed visible signs of the disease. We found that the plasma concentration of haptoglobin was strongly associated with the infection status and could predict probabilities of survival. We also found that nestlings with clinical signs had lower baseline corticosterone concentrations and similar telomere length compared with healthy nestlings, whereas we did not find any association of the infection status with innate immune defenses or with nitric oxide concentration. Overall, our results suggest that the plasma concentration of haptoglobin might be a valuable tool to assess survival probabilities of frigatebird nestlings facing a herpesvirus outbreak.  
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  Notes 10.1093/conphys/cow073 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6042  
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Author Siniscalchi, M.; Padalino, B.; Lusito, R.; Quaranta, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is the left forelimb preference indicative of a stressful situation in horses? Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav. Process.  
  Volume 107 Issue Pages 61-67  
  Keywords Animal welfare; Ethology; Horse; Limb preference; Physiology  
  Abstract Abstract Evidence for behavioural and brain lateralisation is now widespread among the animal kingdom; lateralisation of limb use (pawedness) occurs in several mammals including both feral and domestic horses. We investigated limb preferences in 14 Quarter Horse during different motor tasks (walking, stepping on and off a step, truck loading and unloading). Population lateralisation was observed in two tasks: horses preferentially used their left forelimb during truck loading and stepping off a step. The results also revealed that horses showed higher scores for anxious behaviours during truck loading suggesting that the use of the left forelimb in this task may reflect the main role of the right hemisphere in control of behaviour during stressful situation.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6041  
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Author Karenina, K.; Giljov, A.; Ingram, J.; Rowntree, V.J.; Malashichev, Y. url  openurl
  Title Lateralization of mother–infant interactions in a diverse range of mammal species Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue Pages 0030 Ep -  
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  Publisher Nature Publishing Group SN - Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6040  
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Author Munksgaard, L.; DePassillé, A.M.; Rushen, J.; Herskin, M.S.; Kristensen, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dairy cows' fear of people: social learning, milk yield and behaviour at milking Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 73 Issue 1 Pages 15-26  
  Keywords  
  Abstract We examined the effects of the presence of an unfamiliar, a gentle or an aversive handler during milking on behaviour and milk yield, and whether cows can learn to approach or avoid a handler by observing the neighbouring cow?s responses. In Experiment 1, Danish Friesian cows (n=16) were treated gently (offering hay and concentrates) by one handler and aversively (hit every 15s on the head with the hand) by another handler for six periods of 2min each. The two handlers wore different coloured overalls, and each cow received either gentle or aversive treatment in the first week and the other treatment the following week. All cows kept a longer distance to the aversive than to the gentle handler in a 1min test after treatment. Milk yield and residual milk did not differ when the aversive or the gentle handler was standing in front of the cow during milking, although the cows moved their legs and tail less when the aversive handler was present. When an unfamiliar person was standing in front of the cows during milking, behaviour and milk yield did not differ from control milkings. Cows and heifers (n=10) that had observed their neighbours receiving gentle treatment by one handler and aversive treatment from another handler did not differ in the distance they kept from these two handlers. In Experiment 2, cows (n=15) that had observed the neighbours receiving a gentle treatment (eight times for 2min) kept a shorter distance to that handler after treatment of their neighbours, and the distance they kept was correlated with the distance kept by the neighbouring cows. This suggests that responses of observer cows may be affected by the responses of the cows being treated. The cows rapidly learned to avoid an aversive handler, but although the cows showed clear avoidance response to the aversive handler there was no effect on milk yield when the aversive handler was present at milking.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1016/S0168-1591(01)00119-8 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6039  
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Author Figueroa, J.; Solà-Oriol, D.; Manteca, X.; Pérez, J.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social learning of feeding behaviour in pigs: Effects of neophobia and familiarity with the demonstrator conspecific Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 148 Issue 1 Pages 120-127  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Social interactions facilitate animals learning of new features of their environment minimizing a trial and error process. It has been observed in some species that food cues can be acquired by one individual (the observer) from an animal model (demonstrator) due to social learning. Three experiments were performed to evaluate whether weaned piglets may show a preference for a flavoured feed following brief social interactions (30min) with an experienced demonstrator. After the social interaction between demonstrator and observer pigs, a 30-min choice test between the flavoured feed previously eaten by demonstrators (DEM-feed) and other flavoured feed (OTH-feed; Exp. 1 and 2) or a known unflavoured starter diet (Exp. 3) was performed with observer animals. Greater intake of DEM-feed occurred when demonstrators and observers were from the same pen (Exp. 1) or from the same litter (Exp. 2), but not when observers and demonstrators were unfamiliar with each other (Exp. 1). Observers also preferred flavours previously eaten by the demonstrator over their unflavoured diet already known. Social interactions with a conspecific pig that had a recent experience with a flavoured feed enhanced the preference for that feed and could even override neophobia to a new feed. The familiarity of conspecific demonstrators plays a key role in social learning of new feed cues probably due to selective exploration involving closer snout-to-snout contacts with kin conspecifics.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1016/j.applanim.2013.06.002 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6038  
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Author Ringhofer, M.; Yamamoto, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Domestic horses send signals to humans when they face with an unsolvable task Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Some domestic animals are thought to be skilled at social communication with humans due to the process of domestication. Horses, being in close relationship with humans, similar to dogs, might be skilled at communication with humans. Previous studies have indicated that they are sensitive to bodily signals and the attentional state of humans; however, there are few studies that investigate communication with humans and responses to the knowledge state of humans. Our first question was whether and how horses send signals to their potentially helpful but ignorant caretakers in a problem-solving situation where a food item was hidden in a bucket that was accessible only to the caretakers. We then examined whether horses alter their behaviours on the basis of the caretakers’ knowledge of where the food was hidden. We found that horses communicated to their caretakers using visual and tactile signals. The signalling behaviour of the horses significantly increased in conditions where the caretakers had not seen the hiding of the food. These results suggest that horses alter their communicative behaviour towards humans in accordance with humans’ knowledge state.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1435-9456 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Ringhofer2016 Serial (down) 6037  
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Author Boogert, N.J.; Reader, S.M.; Hoppitt, W.; Laland, K.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The origin and spread of innovations in starlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 1509-1518  
  Keywords diffusion dynamics; dominance; foraging; group; innovation; neophobia; social learning; social network; starling; Sturnus vulgaris  
  Abstract There are numerous reports of novel learned behaviour patterns in animal populations, yet the factors influencing the invention and spread of these innovations remain poorly understood. Here we investigated to what extent the pattern of spread of innovations in captive groups of starlings, Sturnus vulgaris, could be predicted by knowledge of individual and social group variables, including association patterns, social rank orders, measures of neophobia and asocial learning performance. We presented small groups of starlings with a series of novel extractive foraging tasks and recorded the latency for each bird to contact and solve each task, as well as the orders of contacting and solving. We then explored which variables best predicted the observed diffusion patterns. Object neophobia and social rank measures characterized who was the first of the group to contact the novel foraging tasks, and the subsequent spread of contacting tasks was associated with latency to feed in a novel environment. Asocial learning performance, measured in isolation, predicted who was the first solver of the novel foraging tasks in each group. Association patterns did not predict the spread of solving. Contact latency and solving duration were negatively correlated, consistent with social learning underlying the spread of solving. Our findings indicate that we can improve our understanding of the diffusion dynamics of innovations in animal groups by investigating group-dependent and individual variables in combination. We introduce novel methods for exploring predictors of the origin and spread of behavioural innovations that could be widely applied.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6036  
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Author Day, R.L.; Coe, R.L.; Kendal, J.R.; Laland, K.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Neophilia, innovation and social learning: a study of intergeneric differences in callitrichid monkeys Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 65 Issue 3 Pages 559-571  
  Keywords  
  Abstract In a comparative study of neophilia, innovation and social attentiveness we exposed individuals in seven callitrichid species, from three genera, to novel extractive foraging tasks. The results revealed consistently shorter response latencies, higher levels of successful and unsuccessful manipulation, and greater attentiveness to the task and to conspecifics inLeontopithecus (lion tamarins) than in both Saguinus (tamarins) and Callithrix (marmosets). This is consistent with the hypothesis that species dependent upon manipulative and explorative foraging tend to be less neophobic and more innovative than other species. Furthermore, Callithrix appeared to be less neophobic than Saguinus; ifCallithrix is regarded as the greater specialist, this result is inconsistent with the hypothesis that neophobia is associated with foraging specialization. We consider the relevance of our findings to taxonomic relationships, and to technical and Machiavellian intelligence hypotheses and discuss the implications for captive breeding and reintroduction strategies.Copyright 2003 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6035  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yorke, J.; Nugent, W.; Strand, E.; Bolen, R.; New, J.; Davis, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Equine-assisted therapy and its impact on cortisol levels of children and horses: a pilot study and meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Early Child Development and Care Abbreviated Journal Early Child Development and Care  
  Volume 183 Issue 7 Pages 874-894  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Childhood trauma, abuse or neglect impacts the function and structure of the brain of affected children. Attunement with other beings as well as an enriched environment can contribute to normal brain development. The enriched environment of a barn and attunement with an animal may contribute to reductions in stress for traumatised children. A pilot study, using a multiple base line, single case design included four children with post-traumatic stress syndrome (aged eight to ten years) and four therapy riding horses. This study hypothesised that cortisol would correlate between each child?horse pair, using a 12-day intervention that included six consecutive days of riding and grooming. A meta-analysis was completed of correlation levels of four child?horse pairs The weighted mean cross-correlation, controlling for autocorrelation, was 0.23, Z?=?3.03, approximate 95% confidence interval 0.23?±?(1.96???0.076) or 0.08 to 0.38. The data suggest a need for further research.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Routledge Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-4430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1080/03004430.2012.693486 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial (down) 6034  
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