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Author Walter, G.; Reisner, A. url  openurl
  Title Student opinion formation on animal agriculture issues Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 1654-1658  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2935  
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Author Davis, S.L.; Cheeke, P.R. url  openurl
  Title Do domestic animals have minds and the ability to think? A provisional sample of opinions on the question Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 76 Issue 8 Pages 2072-2079  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2930  
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Author Gonyou, H.W. url  openurl
  Title Why the study of animal behavior is associated with the animal welfare issue Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 72 Issue 8 Pages 2171-2177  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2931  
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Author Duncan, I.J.H. url  openurl
  Title D.G.M. Wood-Gush Memorial Lecture: An applied ethologist looks at the question “Why?” Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 44 Issue 2-4 Pages 205-217  
  Keywords Causation; Cognition; Function; Future research; Ontogeny; Phylogeny; States of suffering; Welfare  
  Abstract The question “Why does an animal behave as it does?” can be answered in terms of ontogeny, function, phylogeny and causation. The achievements of applied ethology relative to those four approaches are reviewed, gaps in our knowledge are identified and predictions for fruitful avenues of future research are made. Ontogenic studies have been useful in the past and it is suggested that studies of the effects of early experience on the sexual behaviour of animals used in artificial breeding schemes might pay dividends. It is proposed that functional studies should be approached cautiously. More information is required on the process of domestication in order to increase the chances of success in the trend to farm exotic species. Studies on causation are likely to continue to be the mainstay of applied ethological research. It is suggested that within this category, studies on states of suffering, motivation and cognition are urgently required to answer the most pressing questions on animal welfare.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2919  
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Author Heyes, C.M. url  openurl
  Title Imitation, culture and cognition Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 999-1010  
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  Abstract Abstract. This paper examines the significance of imitation in non-human animals with respect to the phylogenetic origins of culture and cognitive complexity. It is argued that both imitation (learning about behaviour through nonspecific observation) and social learning (learning about the environment through conspecific observation) can mediate social transmission of information, and that neither is likely to play an important role in supporting behavioural traditions or culture. Current evidence suggests that imitation is unlikely to do this because it does not insulate information from modification through individual learning in the retention period between acquisition and re-transmission. Although insignificant in relation to culture, imitation apparently involves complex and little-understood cognitive operations. It is unique in requiring animals spontaneously to equate extrinsic visual input with proprioceptive and/or kinaesthetic feedback from their own actions, but not in requiring or implicating self-consciousness, representation, metarepresentation or a capacity for goal-directed action.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2920  
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Author Duncan, I.J.H.; Petherick, J.C. url  openurl
  Title Proceeding (Paper presented at the Winter Meeting of the Society for Veterinary Ethology, London, Great Britain, 30 November 1988)Cognition: The implications for animal welfare Type Journal Article
  Year 1989 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 81-1010  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2921  
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Author Walker, S. url  openurl
  Title An introduction to animal cognition : By . Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum (1988). Pp. viii + 328. Price [pound sign]8.95 paperback Type Journal Article
  Year 1989 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 37 Issue Part 3 Pages 521-522  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2922  
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Author Inglis, I. url  openurl
  Title H.L. Roitblat, T.G. Bever and H.S. Terrace, Editors, Animal Cognition, Lawrence Erlbaum, New Jersey (1984), p. 682 Type Journal Article
  Year 1985 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 344-345  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2924  
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Author McFarland, D.J. url  openurl
  Title Roger L. Mellgren, Editor, Animal Cognition and Behavior, North-Holland, Amsterdam (1983), p. xi Type Journal Article
  Year 1984 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 634-635  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2925  
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Author Apple, J.K.; Kegley, E.B.; Galloway, D.L.; Wistuba, T.J.; Rakes, L.K. url  openurl
  Title Duration of restraint and isolation stress as a model to study the dark-cutting condition in cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 83 Issue 5 Pages 1202-1214  
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  Abstract Holstein steer calves (n = 32; 156 {+/-} 33.2 kg average BW) were used to evaluate the duration of restraint and isolation stress (RIS) on endocrine and blood metabolite status and the incidence of dark-cutting LM. Calves were blocked by BW and assigned randomly within blocks to one of four stressor treatments: unstressed controls (NS) or a single bout of RIS for 2, 4, or 6 h. Venous blood was collected via indwelling jugular catheters at 40, 20, and 0 min before stressor application and at 20-min intervals during RIS. Unstressed calves remained in their home stanchions and, except for blood sampling, were subjected to minimal handling and stress. Serum cortisol and plasma lactate concentrations were increased (P <0.01) during the first 20 min after RIS application, and remained elevated throughout the 6 h of RIS. Plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin were greater (P <0.05) in RIS calves than in NS calves after 80 and 100 min of stressor application, respectively; however, RIS did not (P >0.80) affect plasma NEFA concentrations. Calves were slaughtered within 20 min of completion of RIS, and muscle samples were excised from right-side LM at 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after exsanguination for quantifying LM pH, and glycogen and lactate concentrations. The pH of the LM from calves subjected to 6 h of RIS exceeded 6.0, and was greater (P <0.05) at 24 and 48 h postmortem than the pH of NS calves or calves subjected to 2 or 4 h RIS. Muscle glycogen concentrations did not differ (P = 0.16; 25.58, 10.41, 13.80, and 14.41 {micro}mol/g of wet tissue weight for NS and 2-, 4-, and 6-h RIS, respectively), and LM lactate concentrations tended to be lower (P = 0.08) in calves subjected to 6 h of RIS. At 48 h after exsanguination, the LM from calves subjected to 6 h of RIS had more (P <0.05) bound and less (P <0.05) free moisture than did the LM from NS calves or calves subjected to 2 or 4 h of RIS. Additionally, the LM from RIS calves was darker (lower L* values; P <0.05) than the LM of NS calves. Visual color scores for the LM were greatest (P < 0.05) for calves subjected to 6 h of RIS and least (P <0.05) for NS calves. Subjecting lightweight Holstein calves to 6, 4, and 2 h of RIS resulted in six (75%), two (25%), and two (25%) carcasses characteristic of the dark-cutting condition, respectively. There were no dark-cutting carcasses produced from NS calves. Thus, RIS may be a reliable animal model with which to study the formation of the dark-cutting condition. N1 -  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2948  
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