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Author Watts, J.M. url  openurl
  Title Animats: computer-simulated animals in behavioral research Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 76 Issue 10 Pages 2596-2604  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2936  
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Author Swanson, J.C. url  openurl
  Title What are animal science departments doing to address contemporary issues? Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 77 Issue 2 Pages 354-360  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2937  
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Author Marshall, T.T.; Hoover, T.S.; Reiling, B.A.; Downs, K.M. url  openurl
  Title Experiential learning in the animal sciences: effect of 13 years of a beef cattle management practicum Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 76 Issue 11 Pages 2947-2952  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2938  
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Author Daly, M.; Wilson, M.I. url  openurl
  Title Human evolutionary psychology and animal behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 57 Issue 3 Pages 509-519  
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  Abstract Homo sapiensis increasingly being studied within the evolutionary (adaptationist, selectionist) framework favoured by animal behaviour researchers. There are various labels for such work, including evolutionary psychology, human behavioural ecology and human sociobiology. Collectively, we call these areas `human evolutionary psychology' (HEP) because their shared objective is an evolutionary understanding of human information processing and decision making. Sexual selection and sex differences have been especially prominent in recent HEP research, but many other topics have been addressed, including parent-offspring relations, reciprocity and exploitation, foraging strategies and spatial cognition. Many HEP researchers began their scientific careers in animal behaviour, and in many ways, HEP research is scarcely distinguishable from other animal behaviour research. Currently controversial issues in HEP, such as the explanation(s) for observed levels of heritable diversity, the kinds of data needed to test adaptationist hypotheses, and the characterization of a species-typical `environment of evolutionary adaptedness', are issues in animal behaviour as well. What gives HEP a distinct methodological flavour is that the research animal can talk, an ability that has both advantages and pitfalls for researchers. The proper use of self-reports and other verbal data in HEP might usefully become a subject of future research in its own right.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2909  
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Author Spinka, M.; Duncan, I.J.H.; Widowski, T.M. url  openurl
  Title Do domestic pigs prefer short-term to medium-term confinement? Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 58 Issue 3-4 Pages 221-232  
  Keywords Cognition; Pig-housing; Preference tests  
  Abstract A preference test was used to demonstrate that gilts have the ability to associate two sets of neutral cues with two different periods of confinement and water deprivation and to anticipate the long-term consequences of their choice in the test. Twelve gilts housed in two large, straw-bedded pens were trained to go to two sets of 12 crates, positioned on each side of a choice point, for feeding twice a day. Following initial training, the two sets of crates were marked with contrasting visual patterns and the patterns were associated with either 30 min (`short' confinement) or 240 min (`long' confinement) of confinement in the crates after entry. During 16 days of preference testing, the gilts were sent alternately to one side or the other in the mornings and allowed to choose in the afternoons. Eight gilts chose the short confinement side more often, two, the long confinement side more often and two, each side an equal number of times, indicating that most gilts learned the association and preferred to be released shortly after feeding. However, gilts still chose the long confinement side on occasion, suggesting that they did not find 240 min of confinement very aversive. When the gilts were sent to the crates in the morning, their behaviour indicated that they expected to be released or confined depending on which crate they were in. The cognitive abilities of animals with respect to perception of time and anticipation of future events have important implications for their welfare. This study demonstrates that methods can be developed to ask animals about such things.  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2910  
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Author Dyer, F.C. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Spatial Cognition: Lessons from Central-place Foraging Insects Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 119-154  
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  Abstract Summary Spatial orientation has played an extremely important role in the development of ideas about the behavioral capacities of animals. Indeed, as the modern scientific study of animal behavior emerged from its roots in zoology and experimental psychology, studies of spatial orientation figured in the work of many of the pioneering researchers, including Tinbergen (), von ), Watson () and .  
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  Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil  
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  ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2913  
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Author Smith, W.J. url  isbn
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  Title Cognitive Implications of an Information-sharing Model of Animal Communication Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 227-243  
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  Abstract Summary In social communication, one animal signals and another responds. Several cognitive steps are involved as the second animal selects its responses; these steps can be described as follows in terms of an informational model. First, the responding individual must evaluate the information made available by the signaling on the basis of other information, available from sources contextual to the signal. Second, the respondent must fit all of the relevant information into patterns generated from recall of past events (conscious recall is not generally required; pattern fitting is a fundamental skill). Third, conditional predictions must be made; and fourth, the individual must test and modify any of these predictions for which significant consequences exist. Many vertebrate animals appear to respond to signaling with considerable flexibility. Communicative events are thus complex but are by no means intractable. Indeed, communication provides us with excellent opportunities to investigate animal cognition.  
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  Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil  
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  ISSN ISBN 9780120770304 Medium  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2914  
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Author Beer, C.G. url  isbn
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  Title Varying Views of Animal and Human Cognition Type Book Chapter
  Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition in Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 435-456  
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  Abstract Summary In this chapter I want to stand back from the splendid empirical work on animal cognitive capacities that is the focus of this book, and look at the broader context of cognitive concerns within which the work can be viewed. Indeed even the term `cognitive ethology' currently connotes and denotes more than is represented here, as other collections of articles, such as and , exemplify. I include the current descendants of behavioristic learning theory, evolutionary epistemology, evolutionary psychology and the recent comparative turn that has been taken in cognitive science. These several approaches, despite their considerable overlap, often appear independent and even ignorant of one another. Like the proverbial blind men feeling the hide of an elephant, they touch hands from time to time, yet collectively have only a piecemeal and distributed understanding of the shape of the whole. Although each approach may indeed need the space to work out its own conceptual and methodological preoccupations without confounding interference from other views, a utopian spirit envisages an ultimate coming together, a more comprehensive realization of the synthetic approach to animal cognition that is this book's theme.  
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  Publisher Academic Press Place of Publication London Editor Russell P. Balda; Irene M. Pepperberg; Alan C. Kamil  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2915  
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Author McGlone, J.J.; Hicks, T.A. url  openurl
  Title Teaching standard agricultural practices that are known to be painful Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 71 Issue 4 Pages 1071-1074  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2933  
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Author Olesen, I.; Groen, A.F.; Gjerde, B. url  openurl
  Title Definition of animal breeding goals for sustainable production systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 78 Issue 3 Pages 570-582  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2934  
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