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Author Cheung, C.; Akiyama, T.E.; Ward, J.M.; Nicol, C.J.; Feigenbaum, L.; Vinson, C.; Gonzalez, F.J. doi  openurl
  Title Diminished hepatocellular proliferation in mice humanized for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Cancer research Abbreviated Journal Cancer Res  
  Volume 64 Issue 11 Pages (down) 3849-3854  
  Keywords Animals; Anticholesteremic Agents/pharmacology; Carcinogens/pharmacology; Cell Division; DNA Replication/drug effects; Fatty Acids/metabolism; Hepatocytes/cytology/drug effects/metabolism/*physiology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Oxidation-Reduction; Peroxisome Proliferators/pharmacology; Pyrimidines/pharmacology; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/genetics/*physiology; Species Specificity; Transcription Factors/genetics/*physiology  
  Abstract Lipid-lowering fibrate drugs function as agonists for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Sustained activation of PPARalpha leads to the development of liver tumors in rats and mice. However, humans appear to be resistant to the induction of peroxisome proliferation and the development of liver cancer by fibrate drugs. The molecular basis of this species difference is not known. To examine the mechanism determining species differences in peroxisome proliferator response between mice and humans, a PPARalpha-humanized mouse line was generated in which the human PPARalpha was expressed in liver under control of the tetracycline responsive regulatory system. The PPARalpha-humanized and wild-type mice responded to treatment with the potent PPARalpha ligand Wy-14643 as revealed by induction of genes encoding peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolizing enzymes and resultant decrease of serum triglycerides. However, surprisingly, only the wild-type mice and not the PPARalpha-humanized mice exhibited hepatocellular proliferation as revealed by elevation of cell cycle control genes, increased incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine into hepatocyte nuclei, and hepatomegaly. These studies establish that following ligand activation, the PPARalpha-mediated pathways controlling lipid metabolism are independent from those controlling the cell proliferation pathways. These findings also suggest that structural differences between human and mouse PPARalpha are responsible for the differential susceptibility to the development of hepatocarcinomas observed after treatment with fibrates. The PPARalpha-humanized mice should serve as models for use in drug development and human risk assessment and to determine the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis of peroxisome proliferators.  
  Address Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-5472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15172993 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 74  
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Author Roth, L.S.V.; Balkenius, A.; Kelber, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Absolute Threshold of Colour Vision in the Horse Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication PLoS ONE Abbreviated Journal PLoS ONE  
  Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages (down) e3711 EP -  
  Keywords  
  Abstract <p>Arrhythmic mammals are active both during day and night if they are allowed. The arrhythmic horses are in possession of one of the largest terrestrial animal eyes and the purpose of this study is to reveal whether their eye is sensitive enough to see colours at night. During the day horses are known to have dichromatic colour vision. To disclose whether they can discriminate colours in dim light a behavioural dual choice experiment was performed. We started the training and testing at daylight intensities and the horses continued to choose correctly at a high frequency down to light intensities corresponding to moonlight. One Shetland pony mare, was able to discriminate colours at 0.08 cd/m2, while a half blood gelding, still discriminated colours at 0.02 cd/m2. For comparison, the colour vision limit for several human subjects tested in the very same experiment was also 0.02 cd/m2. Hence, the threshold of colour vision for the horse that performed best was similar to that of the humans. The behavioural results are in line with calculations of the sensitivity of cone vision where the horse eye and human eye again are similar. The advantage of the large eye of the horse lies not in colour vision at night, but probably instead in achromatic tasks where presumably signal summation enhances sensitivity.</p>  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5625  
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Author Hieshima, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Hanamoto, H.; Nakayama, T.; Nagakubo, D.; Kanamaru, A.; Yoshie, O. url  openurl
  Title CC Chemokine Ligands 25 and 28 Play Essential Roles in Intestinal Extravasation of IgA Antibody-Secreting Cells Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication The Journal of Immunology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 173 Issue 6 Pages (down) 3668-3675  
  Keywords  
  Abstract CCL25 (also known as thymus-expressed chemokine) and CCL28 (also known as mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine) play important roles in mucosal immunity by recruiting IgA Ab-secreting cells (ASCs) into mucosal lamina propria. However, their exact roles in vivo still remain to be defined. In this study, we first demonstrated in mice that IgA ASCs in small intestine expressed CCR9, CCR10, and CXCR4 on the cell surface and migrated to their respective ligands CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL12 (also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1), whereas IgA ASCs in colon mainly expressed CCR10 and CXCR4 and migrated to CCL28 and CXCL12. Reciprocally, the epithelial cells of small intestine were immunologically positive for CCL25 and CCL28, whereas those of colon were positive for CCL28 and CXCL12. Furthermore, the venular endothelial cells in small intestine were positive for CCL25 and CCL28, whereas those in colon were positive for CCL28, suggesting their direct roles in extravasation of IgA ASCs. Consistently, in mice orally immunized with cholera toxin (CT), anti-CCL25 suppressed homing of CT-specific IgA ASCs into small intestine, whereas anti-CCL28 suppressed homing of CT-specific IgA ASCs into both small intestine and colon. Reciprocally, CT-specific ASCs and IgA titers in the blood were increased in mice treated with anti-CCL25 or anti-CCL28. Anti-CXCL12 had no such effects. Finally, both CCL25 and CCL28 were capable of enhancing α4 integrin-dependent adhesion of IgA ASCs to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 and VCAM-1. Collectively, CCL25 and CCL28 play essential roles in intestinal homing of IgA ASCs primarily by mediating their extravasation into intestinal lamina propria.  
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  Notes 10.4049/jimmunol.173.6.3668 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6011  
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Author Witte, T.H.; Knill, K.; Wilson, A.M. doi  openurl
  Title Determination of peak vertical ground reaction force from duty factor in the horse (Equus caballus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol  
  Volume 207 Issue Pt 21 Pages (down) 3639-3648  
  Keywords *Acceleration; Animals; Biomechanics; Forelimb/physiology; *Gait; Hindlimb/physiology; Horses/*physiology; Locomotion/*physiology; Telemetry; Time Factors  
  Abstract Measurement of peak vertical ground reaction force (GRFz) from multiple limbs simultaneously during high-speed, over-ground locomotion would enhance our understanding of the locomotor mechanics of cursorial animals. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of predicting peak GRFz from duty factor (the proportion of the stride for which the limb is in contact with the ground). Foot-mounted uniaxial accelerometers, combined with UHF FM telemetry, are shown to be practical and accurate for the field measurement of stride timing variables, including duty factor. Direct comparison with the force plate produces a mean error of 2.3 ms and 3.5 ms for the timing of foot on and foot off, respectively, across all gaits. Predictions of peak GRFz from duty factor show mean errors (with positive values indicating an overestimate) of 0.8+/-0.04 N kg(-1) (13%; N=42; mean +/- S.E.M.) at walk, -0.3+/-0.06 N kg(-1) (3%; N=75) at trot, -2.3+/-0.27 N kg(-1) (16%; N=18) for the non-lead limb at canter and +2.1+/-0.7 N kg(-1) (19%; N=9) for the lead limb at canter. The substantial over- and underestimate seen at canter, in the lead and non-lead limbs, respectively, is attributed to the different functions performed by the two limbs in the asymmetrical gaits. The difference in load experienced by the lead and non-lead limbs decreased with increasing speed.  
  Address Structure and Motion Lab, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15371472 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3658  
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Author Siniscalchi, M.; Quaranta, A.; Rogers, L.J. doi  openurl
  Title Hemispheric specialization in dogs for processing different acoustic stimuli Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication PloS ONE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages (down) e3349  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5415  
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Author McComb, K.; Shannon, G.; Durant, S.M.; Sayialel, K.; Slotow, R.; Poole, J.; Moss, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Leadership in elephants: the adaptive value of age Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B.  
  Volume 278 Issue 1722 Pages (down) 3270-3276  
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  Abstract The value of age is well recognized in human societies, where older individuals often emerge as leaders in tasks requiring specialized knowledge, but what part do such individuals play in other social species? Despite growing interest in how effective leadership might be achieved in animal social systems, the specific role that older leaders may play in decision-making has rarely been experimentally investigated. Here, we use a novel playback paradigm to demonstrate that in African elephants (Loxodonta africana), age affects the ability of matriarchs to make ecologically relevant decisions in a domain critical to survival—the assessment of predatory threat. While groups consistently adjust their defensive behaviour to the greater threat of three roaring lions versus one, families with younger matriarchs typically under-react to roars from male lions despite the severe danger they represent. Sensitivity to this key threat increases with matriarch age and is greatest for the oldest matriarchs, who are likely to have accumulated the most experience. Our study provides the first empirical evidence that individuals within a social group may derive significant benefits from the influence of an older leader because of their enhanced ability to make crucial decisions about predatory threat, generating important insights into selection for longevity in cognitively advanced social mammals.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5652  
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Author Dunn, M.F.; Branlant, G. openurl 
  Title Roles of zinc ion and reduced coenzyme in horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase catalysis. The mechanism of aldehyde activation Type Journal Article
  Year 1975 Publication Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal Biochemistry  
  Volume 14 Issue 14 Pages (down) 3176-3182  
  Keywords *Alcohol Oxidoreductases/metabolism; Aldehydes/*pharmacology; Animals; Binding Sites; Enzyme Activation/drug effects; Horses; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Kinetics; Liver/enzymology; *NAD/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology; Oxidation-Reduction; Protein Binding; Spectrophotometry; Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet; Temperature; *Zinc/pharmacology  
  Abstract 1,4,5,6-Tetrahydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (H2NADH) has been investigated as a reduced coenzyme analog in the reaction between trans-4-N,N-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (I) (lambdamax 398 nm, epsilonmax 3.15 X 10-4 M-minus 1 cm-minus 1) and the horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase-NADH complex. These equilibrium binding and temperature-jump kinetic studies establish the following. (i) Substitution of H2NADH for NADH limits reaction to the reversible formation of a new chromophoric species, lambdamax 468 nm, epsilonmax 5.8 x 10-4 M-minus 1 cm-minus 1. This chromophore is demonstrated to be structurally analogous to the transient intermediate formed during the reaction of I with the enzyme-NADH complex [Dunn, M. F., and Hutchison, J. S. (1973), Biochemistry 12, 4882]. (ii) The process of intermediate formation with the enzyme-NADH complex is independent of pH over the range 6.13-10.54. Although studies were limited to the pH range 5.98-8.72, a similar pH independence appears to hold for the H2NADH system. (iii) Within the ternary complex, I is bound within van der Waal's contact distance of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring. (iv) Formation of the transient intermediate does not involve covalent modification of coenzyme. Based on these findings, we conclude that zinc ion has a Lewis acid function in facilitating the chemical activation of the aldehyde carbonyl for reduction, and that reduced coenzyme plays a noncovalent effector role in this substrate activating step.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-2960 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:238585 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3817  
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Author Hoover, T.S.; Marshall, T.T. url  openurl
  Title A comparison of learning styles and demographic characteristics of students enrolled in selected animal science courses Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 76 Issue 12 Pages (down) 3169-3173  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2939  
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Author Proops, L.; McComb, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-modal individual recognition in domestic horses (Equus caballus) extends to familiar humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 279 Issue 1741 Pages (down) 3131-3138  
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  Abstract It has recently been shown that some non-human animals can cross-modally recognize members of their own taxon. What is unclear is just how plastic this recognition system can be. In this study, we investigate whether an animal, the domestic horse, is capable of spontaneous cross-modal recognition of individuals from a morphologically very different species. We also provide the first insights into how cross-modal identity information is processed by examining whether there are hemispheric biases in this important social skill. In our preferential looking paradigm, subjects were presented with two people and playbacks of their voices to determine whether they were able to match the voice with the person. When presented with familiar handlers subjects could match the specific familiar person with the correct familiar voice. Horses were significantly better at performing the matching task when the congruent person was standing on their right, indicating marked hemispheric specialization (left hemisphere bias) in this ability. These results are the first to demonstrate that cross-modal recognition in animals can extend to individuals from phylogenetically very distant species. They also indicate that processes governed by the left hemisphere are central to the cross-modal matching of visual and auditory information from familiar individuals in a naturalistic setting.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5616  
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Author Ordakowski-Burk, A.L.; Quinn, R.W.; Shellem, T.A.; Vough, L.R. doi  openurl
  Title Voluntary intake and digestibility of reed canarygrass and timothy hay fed to horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Journal of Animal Science Abbreviated Journal J. Anim Sci.  
  Volume 84 Issue 11 Pages (down) 3104-3109  
  Keywords Animal Feed/*analysis; Animal Nutrition Physiology; Animals; Diet/*veterinary; Digestion/*physiology; Feeding Behavior/*physiology; Horses/*physiology; Male; Poaceae/*metabolism  
  Abstract Thousands of hectares of timothy (Phleum pretense L.) grown in the Mid-Atlantic region are infected by cereal rust mite (Abacarus hysterix) that causes discoloration and curling of leaves, decreased nutritional quality, and substantial decreases in yield. A decline in production of timothy hay can lower income for hay producers and cause horse owners to search for alternative hays. Low alkaloid reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) hay has potential as an alternative to timothy hay because it grows well in the Mid-Atlantic region, is believed to have a similar nutrient quality to timothy, and is not as susceptible to cereal rust mite. Eleven mature, stalled Thoroughbred geldings (549 +/- 12.1 kg) that were exercised daily were used to compare voluntary DMI and apparent nutrient DM digestibility of timothy and low-alkaloid Chiefton variety reed canarygrass hay. Horses were paired by age and BW and randomly assigned to timothy or reed canarygrass hay during a 14-d period to measure voluntary DMI followed by a 4-d period to measure apparent DM digestibility. Both hays met the minimum requirements for DE, CP, Ca, P, K, Fe, and Mn, but they did not meet the minimum requirements for Cu, Zn, and Na for horses at maintenance and averaging 550 kg of BW. Timothy hay seemed to have a lower CP concentration (14.4%) compared with reed canarygrass hay (17.1%) and a more desirable Ca:P ratio at 1.6:1 compared with 0.8:1 for reed canarygrass hay. Horses fed timothy consumed more hay (P <0.001) during the voluntary DMI period compared with horses fed reed canarygrass. Greater voluntary DMI of timothy occurred on d 1, 3, and 5 (P <0.05), but DMI was similar for other days. Apparent DM digestibility was greater in horses fed timothy hay by 9.6% compared with horses fed reed canarygrass hay (P <0.05). Horses fed timothy had greater DM digestibility of ADF (P = 0.001), NDF (P = 0.001), sugar (P = 0.05), and Ca (P = 0.001) but lower apparent DM digestibility of CP (P = 0.012) and crude fat (P = 0.004). Timothy hay was superior in voluntary DMI and apparent DM digestibility compared with low-alkaloid reed canarygrass hay fed to horses.  
  Address Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 20742, USA. amyburk@umd.edu  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1525-3163 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:17032805 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4236  
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