toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Christensen, J.W.; Munk, R.; Hawson, L.; Palme, R.; Larsen, T.; Egenvall, A.; König von Borstel, U.U.; Rørvang, M.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rider effects on horses' conflict behaviour, rein tension, physiological measures and rideability scores Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 234 Issue Pages 105184  
  Keywords Equitation science; Heart rate; Horse riding; Sport horse; Temperament; Training cues  
  Abstract Many breeding organisations include a subjective scoring of rideability by a professional rider into their evaluation of sports horses, but the consistency and reliability of the scoring system is debateable. The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether professional riders agree in their scoring of rideability, and (ii) whether rideability scores are affected by rein tension, horse conflict behaviour, heart rate, and salivary cortisol, and (iii) whether riders induce different levels of conflict behaviour and physiological responses in the horses. Ten professional, female riders each rode 10 dressage horses (level M German scale; n = 100 combinations) through a standardised dressage test (10 min warm-up followed by a 4-min test) and subsequently scored the horses for rideability on the official 1-10 scale (1 = poor to 10 = excellent) from the Danish Riding Federation. Rein tension, horse heart rate, saliva cortisol and conflict behaviour were measured for each rider-horse pair. The riders were inconsistent in their scoring of rideability to the individual horses, e.g. scores for one of the horses ranged from 1 to 8. There was a significant effect of rider (P = 0.003) and the frequency of conflict behaviour (undesired head movements: P < 0.001, breaking the gait: P = 0.013, and other evasive behaviour: P = 0.032) on rideability scores, i.e. the more conflict behaviour the lower the score. There was no significant effect of rein tension and the physiological measures on rideability scores. However, there was a significant effect of rider on rein tension, horses' heart rate and increases in saliva cortisol concentrations and a tendency for some types of conflict behaviour, suggesting that some riders induced more discomfort in the horses. Future studies could help shed light on which elements of riding style are particularly important for sports horse welfare. In conclusion, this study found a large variation in rideability scores assigned to ten sports horses by ten professional riders. Rideability scores were dependent on the level of horse conflict behaviour, but not rein tension and physiological measures. Further studies are needed to improve the objectivity, consistency and reliability of rideability assessment of sports horses.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6696  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krueger, K.; Trager, L.; Farmer, K.; Byrne, R. doi  openurl
  Title Tool Use in Horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2022 Publication Animals Abbreviated Journal Animals  
  Volume 12 Issue 15 Pages 1876  
  Keywords crowdsourcing; horse; innovation; mule; management; tool use  
  Abstract Tool use has not yet been confirmed in horses, mules or donkeys. As this subject is difficult to research with conventional methods, we used a crowdsourcing approach to gather data. We contacted equid owners and carers and asked them to report and video examples of â&#65533;&#65533;unusualâ&#65533;&#65533; behaviour via a dedicated website. We also searched YouTube and Facebook for videos of equids showing tool use. From 635 reports, including 1014 behaviours, we found 20 cases of tool use, 13 of which were unambiguous in that it was clear that the behaviour was not trained, caused by reduced welfare, incidental or accidental. We then assessed (a) the effect of management conditions on tool use and (b) whether the animals used tools alone, or socially, involving other equids or humans. We found that management restrictions were associated with corresponding tool use in 12 of the 13 cases (p = 0.01), e.g., equids using sticks to scrape hay within reach when feed was restricted. Furthermore, 8 of the 13 cases involved other equids or humans, such as horses using brushes to groom others. The most frequent tool use was for foraging, with seven examples, tool use for social purposes was seen in four cases, and there was just one case of tool use for escape. There was just one case of tool use for comfort, and in this instance, there were no management restrictions. Equids therefore can develop tool use, especially when management conditions are restricted, but it is a rare occurrence.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title Animals  
  Series Volume 12 Series Issue 15 Edition  
  ISSN 2076-2615 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6695  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Suagee-Bedore, J.K.; Linden, D.R.; Bennett-Wimbush, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Pen Size on Stress Responses of Stall-Housed Horses Receiving One Hour of Daily Turnout Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal J. Equine Vet. Sci.  
  Volume 98 Issue Pages 103366  
  Keywords Agonistic behaviors; Cortisol; Group turnout; Paddock sizes  
  Abstract Group turnout provides important socializing opportunities for horses, particularly those that are primarily stalled. A high percentage of equine injuries occur during group turnout, which could partly be due to the physical constraints of fencing. To investigate appropriate paddock sizes for group turnouts, horses (n = 12) from a single herd were divided into groups of 4, stalled for 24 hours, and then turned out for 1 hour into one of three differently sized pens: 342, 263, and 184 m2 per horse. Groups rotated through pens across 3 days, receiving one treatment per day. Blood was sampled for cortisol concentrations at 08:00 hours each morning, and then at 15 and 60 minutes into the turn out sessions, and 60 minutes after return to individual stalls. Groups rotated through three turnout times: 09:00, 12:00, 14:00 hours. Counts of agonistic behaviors (chasing, contact biting, and kicking) and low-level threats (pinned ears, tail swishing, bite and kick threats) were recorded. When turned out in pens that provided 342 m2 per horse, horses exhibited reduced plasma cortisol concentrations by 15 minutes after turnout and at 1 hour after return to their stalls (P < .05). Horses in pens providing 184 m2 per horse exhibited greater agonistic (P < .001) and low-level threat (P < .01) behaviors than horses in larger pens. These data provide insight into appropriate pen sizes for horses from established herds. Providing at least 342 m2 per horse may reduce the chance of injury in horses accustomed to group turnout.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6694  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dyson, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram Type Journal Article
  Year 2022 Publication Equine Veterinary Education Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet Educ  
  Volume 34 Issue 7 Pages 372-380  
  Keywords horse; lameness; canter; behaviour; saddle-fit; rider skill  
  Abstract Summary The Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE) comprises 24 behaviours, the majority of which are at least 10 times more likely to be seen in lame horses compared with non-lame horses. The observation of >=8/24 behaviours is likely to reflect the presence of musculoskeletal pain, although some lame horses score <8/24 behaviours. A marked reduction in RHpE scores after resolution of lameness using diagnostic anaesthesia proves a causal relationship between pain and RHpE scores. Horses should be assessed for approximately 10?min in walk, trot (including 10?m diameter circles), canter and transitions. The validity of the RHpE has been verified for use in horses which perform dressage-type movements, and which have been trained to work with the front of the head in a vertical position. It has not, as yet, been used in horses while jumping, racehorses, western performance or endurance horses. The RHpE provides a valuable tool for riders, trainers, veterinarians and other equine professionals to recognise the presence of musculoskeletal pain, even if overt lameness cannot be recognised. Riders with a higher skill-level may improve gait quality, but cannot obscure behavioural signs of pain, although specific behaviours may change. Tight saddle tree points, the rider sitting on the caudal third of the saddle and rider weight may influence RHpE scores. Accurate application of the RHpE requires training and practice. The RHpE is a powerful tool for the assessment of ridden horses and the identification of likely musculoskeletal pain. Such pain merits further investigation and treatment, to improve equine welfare and performance. The RHpE provides an additional means of evaluating the response to diagnostic anaesthesia. It provides a mechanism for client education and a diplomatic way of communicating with clients about equine discomfort related to saddle-fit, rider size, their position in the saddle and ability to ride in balance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Medical Association (AMA) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-7734 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes https://doi.org/10.1111/eve.13468 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6693  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Marr, I.; Stefanski, V.; Krueger, K doi  openurl
  Title Lateralität – ein Indikator für das Tierwohl?[Laterality – an animal welfare indicator?] Type Journal Article
  Year 2022 Publication Der Praktische Tierarzt Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 103 Issue 12/2022 Pages 1246-12757  
  Keywords Sensorische Lateralität – motorische Lateralität – stress – cognitive bias  
  Abstract Ein gutes Tierwohl definiert sich nicht nur durch die Abwesenheit von Stressindikatoren, sondern auch durch das Vorhandensein von Indikatoren, die auf ein gutes Wohlergehen hinweisen. So können stressbedingte Erkrankungen vermieden werden. Zur Bestimmung des Tierwohls bei Pferden wurde daher untersucht, inwieweit sich die sensorische Lateralität (einseitiger Gebrauch von Sinnesorganen) und die motorische Lateralität (einseitiger Gebrauch von Gliedmaßen) als einfach, schnell und kostengünstig zu erhebende Parameter eignen. Hierzu werden neben aktueller Literatur auch die eigenen Untersuchungsergebnisse zusammenfassend dargestellt. Die nach außen sichtbar werdende sensorische und motorische Lateralität sind das Resultat der cerebralen Lateralisierung. Dies beinhaltet nicht nur die Aufgabenteilung beider Gehirnhälften für ein effizienteres Aufnehmen und Speichern von Informationen, sondern sie steht auch in Verbindung mit der Entstehung und Verarbeitung von Emotionen, die maßgeblich am Wohlergehen eines Lebewesens beteiligt sind. Kurzzeitige Stressoren führen zu einer Erregung, die je nach Erfahrungen mit positiven oder negativen Emotionen in Verbindung steht. Emotionen helfen dem Organismus dabei, zu überleben. Andauernde negative Emotionen durch regelmäßige oder anhaltende negative Ereignisse führen zu Stress und reduzieren die Erwartung positiver Ereignisse (negativer cognitive Bias). Das Tier ist im Wohlergehen beeinträchtigt. Jüngst zeigte insbesondere die Messung der motorischen Lateralität Potenzial als Indikator für lang anhaltenden und chronischen Stress, denn gestresste Pferde, deren Stresshormonlevel stark ansteigt, zeigen einen zunehmenden Gebrauch der linken Gliedmaßen über einen längeren Zeitraum. Weiterhin zeigen erste Messungen einen Zusammenhang zwischen einer linksseitigen motorischen Lateralität und einer reduzierten Erwartung positiver Ereignisse (negativer cognitive Bias). Zusammen mit der sensorischen Lateralität, die in einer akuten Stressphase ebenso eine Linksverschiebung zeigt und somit als Indikator für Kurzzeitstress gilt, kann eine generelle, vermehrte Linksseitigkeit auch einen Hinweis auf erhöhte Emotionalität und Stressanfälligkeit sein. Eine sich steigernde Linksseitigkeit bedeutet eine präferierte Informationsverarbeitung durch die rechte Gehirnhälfte, die beispielsweise reaktives Verhalten, starke Emotionen und Stressantworten steuert. Es stellte sich jedoch heraus, dass wie bei allen Stressindikatoren auch in der Lateralitätsmessung ein Vergleichswert aus einer vorangegangenen Messung notwendig ist, denn nur Veränderungen zum häufiger werdenden Gebrauch der linken Seite können auf Stress bei Pferden hindeuten und die parallele Erhebung weiterer Parameter, wie zum Beispiel das Verhalten oder Stresshormone, können die Aussage der Lateralität bekräftigen.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Schlütersche Fachmedien GmbH Place of Publication Hannover Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0032-681X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6692  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wotschikowsky, U. openurl 
  Title Wölfe und Jäger in der Oberlausitz Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Broschüre, Freundeskreis freilebender Wölfe Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6691  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Holzapfel, M.; Wagner, C.; Kluth, G. et al. openurl 
  Title Zur Nahrungsökologie der Wölfe (Canis lupus) in Deutschland. Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Beiträge zur Jagd- und Wildforschung Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 36 Issue Pages 117-128  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6690  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mori, E.; Benatti, L.; Lovari, S.; Ferretti, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What does the wild boar mean to the wolf? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 63 Issue 1 Pages 9  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Generalist predators are expected to shape their diets according to the local availability of prey species. In turn, the extent of consumption of a prey would be influenced by the number of alternative prey species. We have tested this prediction by considering the wild boar and the grey wolf: two widespread species whose distribution ranges overlap largely in Southern Europe, e.g. in Italy. We have reviewed 16 studies from a total of 21 study areas, to assess whether the absolute frequency of occurrence of wild boar in the wolf diet was influenced by (i) occurrence of the other ungulate species in diet and (ii) the number of available ungulate species. Wild boar turned out to be the main prey of the wolf (49% occurrence, on average), followed by roe deer (24%) and livestock (18%). Occurrence of wild boar in the wolf diet decreased with increasing usage of roe deer, livestock, and to a lower extent, chamois and red deer. The number of prey species did not influence the occurrence of wild boar in the wolf diet. The wild boar is a gregarious, noisy and often locally abundant ungulate, thus easily detectable, to a predator. In turn, the extent of predation on this ungulate may not be influenced so much by the availability of other potential prey. Heavy artificial reductions of wild boar numbers, e.g. through numerical control, may concentrate predation by wolves on alternative prey (e.g. roe deer) and/or livestock, thus increasing conflicts with human activities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-0574 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Mori2016 Serial 6689  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meriggi, A.; Dagradi, V.; Dondina, O.; Perversi, M.; Milanesi, P.; Lombardini, M.; Raviglione, S.; Repossi, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Short-term responses of wolf feeding habits to changes of wild and domestic ungulate abundance in Northern Italy Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Ethology Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ethology Ecology & Evolution  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 389-411  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0394-9370 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1080/03949370.2014.986768 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6688  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Capitani, C.; Chynoweth, M.; Kusak, J.; Çoban, E.; Sekercioglu, Ç.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wolf diet in an agricultural landscape of north-eastern Turkey Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Mammalia Abbreviated Journal Mammalia  
  Volume 80 Issue 3 Pages 329-334  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Mammalia Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 80 Series Issue 3 Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6687  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print