toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Andersen, N.H.; Norgaard, A.; Jensen, T.J.; Ulstrup, J. url  openurl
  Title Sequential unfolding of the two-domain protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c4 Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 88 Issue 3-4 Pages 316-327  
  Keywords P. stutzeri cytochrome c4; Sequential unfolding; Di-haem protein; Unfolding  
  Abstract P. stutzeri cytochrome c4 is a di-haem protein, composed of two globular domains each with His-Met coordinated haem, and a hydrogen bond network between the domains. The domain foldings are highly symmetric but with specific differences including structural differences of ligand coordination, and different spin states of the oxidised haem groups. We have studied unfolding of oxidised P. stutzeri cyt c4 induced thermally and by chemical denaturants. Horse heart cyt c was a reference molecule. Isothermal unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride and acid was followed by Soret, α/β, and 701-nm band absorption, and by far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. Multifarious patterns emerge, but the two domains clearly unfold sequentially. One phase, assigned to unfolding of the N-terminal domain, proceeds at guanidinium concentrations up to [approximate]1.0 M. This is followed by two overlapping phases at higher concentrations. The intermediate state maintains Fe-Met coordination, assigned to the C-terminal domain. Interdomain interaction is reflected in decreasing values of the cooperativity parameters. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a single peak, but two peaks appear when guanidinium chloride up to 0.4 M is present. This reflects different chemical action in chemical and thermal unfolding. Acid-induced unfolding kinetics was addressed by pH jumps using diode array stopped-flow techniques. Three kinetic phases in the 701 nm Fe-Met marker band, and four phases in the Soret and α/β bands, spanning 4-1000 ms could be distinguished on pH jumps from 7.5 to the range 2.5-3.5. In this range of time and pH cyt c appears to unfold in no more than two phases. Spectral properties of the kinetic intermediates could be identified. Sequential domain unfolding, formation of high-spin states, and an intermediate state with Fe-Met coordination to a single haem group are features of the unfolding kinetics.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 3973  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson , M.C.;Shettleworth, S.J. doi  openurl
  Title Behavioral adaptation to fixed-interval and fixed-time food delivery in golden hamsters Type Journal Article
  Year 1977 Publication Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) Abbreviated Journal J Exp Anal Behav  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 33-49  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Food-deprived golden hamsters in a large enclosure received food every 30 sec contingent on lever pressing, or free while their behavior was continuously recorded in terms of an exhaustive classification of motor patterns. As with other species in other situations, behavior became organized into two main classes. One (terminal behaviors) increased in probability throughout interfood intervals; the other (interim behaviors) peaked earlier in interfood intervals. Which class an activity belonged to was independent of whether food was contingent on lever pressing. When food was omitted on some of the intervals (thwarting), the terminal activities began sooner in the next interval, and different interim activities changed in different ways. The interim activities did not appear to be schedule-induced in the usual sense. Rather, the hamsters left the area of the feeder when food was not due and engaged in activities they would normally perform in the experimental environment.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-5002 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16811980 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson B. doi  openurl
  Title Dendrites and cognition: A negative pilot study in the rat Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Intelligence Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 291-308  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 3453  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson JR openurl 
  Title The development of self-recognition: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 1984 Publication Dev. Psychobiol. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 17 Issue Pages 35  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2977  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson JR; Gallup GG openurl 
  Title Self-recognition in Saguinus? A critical essay Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 54 Issue Pages 1563  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson, C.; Franks, N.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Teams in animal societies Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behav. Ecol.  
  Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 534-540  
  Keywords animal societies, cooperation, division of labor, groups, invertebrates, task types, teams, vertebrates  
  Abstract We review the existence of teams in animal societies. Teams have previously been dismissed in all but a tiny minority of insect societies. “Team” is a term not generally used in studies of vertebrates. We propose a new rigorous definition of a team that may be applied to both vertebrate and invertebrate societies. We reconsider what it means to work as a team or group and suggest that there are many more teams in insect societies than previously thought. A team task requires different subtasks to be performed concurrently for successful completion. There is a division of labor within a team. Contrary to previous reviews of teams in social insects, we do not constrain teams to consist of members of different castes and argue that team members may be interchangeable. Consequently, we suggest that a team is simply the set of individuals that performs a team task. We contrast teams with groups and suggest that a group task requires the simultaneous performance and cooperation of two or more individuals for successful completion. In a group, there is no division of labor--each individual performs the same task. We also contrast vertebrate and invertebrate teams and find that vertebrate teams tend to be associated with hunting and are based on individual recognition. Invertebrate teams occur in societies characterized by a great deal of redundancy, and we predict that teams in insect societies are more likely to be found in large polymorphic (“complex”) societies than in small monomorphic (“simple”) societies.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes 10.1093/beheco/12.5.534 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 2070  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson, G.D. ; Herlocker,D.J. url  openurl
  Title Soil factors affecting the distribution of the vegetation types and their utilization by wild animals in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Ecol  
  Volume 61 Issue Pages 627-651  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2217  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson, G.D.;Talbot, L.M. url  openurl
  Title Soil factors affecting distribution of the grassland types and their utilization by wild animals on the Serengeti Plains Type Journal Article
  Year 1965 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Ecol  
  Volume 53 Issue Pages 1  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson, J.R. doi  openurl
  Title Self-recognition in dolphins: credible cetaceans; compromised criteria, controls, and conclusions Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Consciousness and Cognition Abbreviated Journal Conscious Cogn  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 239-243  
  Keywords Animal Communication; Animals; *Awareness; Discrimination Learning; Dolphins/*psychology; Female; Male; Orientation; *Self Concept; Social Behavior; *Television; *Visual Perception  
  Abstract  
  Address Laboratoire de Psychophysiologie, CNRS URA 1295, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1053-8100 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8521263 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4163  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Anderson, J.R.; Fornasieri, I.; Ludes, E.; Roeder, J.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social processes and innovative behaviour in changing groups of lemur fulvus Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav. Process.  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 101-112  
  Keywords Social learning; Lemur fulvus; Dominance; Individual differences  
  Abstract A group of brown lemurs was presented with one or two baited food-boxes requiring a specific type of motor response in order to be opened. Subsequently, four groups containing different combinations of experienced individuals from the original group and naive individuals were tested. Solutions to the problem and access to the food were recorded and considered in relation to social factors. In the original group, two adult males learned to open the boxes, with one male increasingly preventing the other from approaching. In the second group, with the subordinate male and certain females removed, the dominant male tolerated successful performances by a juvenile female. Group 3 consisted of three passive female participants from the original group and a naive female; one of the three original females now became the sole box-opener. The introduction of the subordinate male from the original group into the all-female group led to a sharing of box-opening by this subject and the skilled female. In the final group, intense aggression toward the skilled female by a new, naive adult male resulted in two previously passive females succeeding on some occasions. In lemurs, at least some `scroungers' appear able to learn to perform a new act when the social context permits.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 576  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print