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Author (up) Alves, C.; Chichery, R.; Boal, J.G.; Dickel, L. doi  openurl
  Title Orientation in the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: response versus place learning Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 29-36  
  Keywords Animals; *Decapodiformes; Exploratory Behavior; *Maze Learning; Memory; *Space Perception  
  Abstract Several studies have demonstrated that mammals, birds and fish use comparable spatial learning strategies. Unfortunately, except in insects, few studies have investigated spatial learning mechanisms in invertebrates. Our study aimed to identify the strategies used by cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) to solve a spatial task commonly used with vertebrates. A new spatial learning procedure using a T-maze was designed. In this maze, the cuttlefish learned how to enter a dark and sandy compartment. A preliminary test confirmed that individual cuttlefish showed an untrained side-turning preference (preference for turning right or left) in the T-maze. This preference could be reliably detected in a single probe trial. In the following two experiments, each individual was trained to enter the compartment opposite to its side-turning preference. In Experiment 1, distal visual cues were provided around the maze. In Experiment 2, the T-maze was surrounded by curtains and two proximal visual cues were provided above the apparatus. In both experiments, after acquisition, strategies used by cuttlefish to orient in the T-maze were tested by creating a conflict between the formerly rewarded algorithmic behaviour (turn, response learning) and the visual cues identifying the goal (place learning). Most cuttlefish relied on response learning in Experiment 1; the two strategies were used equally often in Experiment 2. In these experiments, the salience of cues provided during the experiment determined whether cuttlefish used response or place learning to solve this spatial task. Our study demonstrates for the first time the presence of multiple spatial strategies in cuttlefish that appear to closely parallel those described in vertebrates.  
  Address Laboratoire de Physiologie du Comportement des Cephalopodes, Universite de Caen, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032, Caen cedex, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1435-9448 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16794852 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2461  
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Author (up) Amandine Ramseyer; Bernard Thierry; Alain Boissy; Bertrand Dumont doi  openurl
  Title Decision-making Processes in Group Departures of Cattle Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 115 Issue 10 Pages 948-957  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To keep social cohesiveness, group-living animals have to reach consensus decisions through recruitment processes. This implies that decision-making depends on the behaviours and social relationships of several group members at different stages of movements. We tested these assumptions in a group of fifteen 18-mo-old Charolais heifers (Bos taurus) at pasture, in which two observers continuously videotaped social interactions and group departures after resting periods. These departures were preceded by a phase of preparation characterized by an increase in activity. The number of heifers participating to a movement increased with the number of group members oriented in the direction of the movement before departure. The first moving animal also recruited a higher number of mates when it had a greater number of close neighbours, the first individuals to follow being mainly its preferential partners. Coercive interactions such as pressing behaviours were observed within the 5 min preceding or following departure. After departure, the numbers of walks and restarts of the first two movers were still operative in recruiting others. The frequency of pauses of the first mover was significantly higher when it was not followed, meaning that it adjusted its behaviour to that of other group members. Decision-making was distributed among group members, with any individual being liable to move first. The behaviour of cows and their spatial distribution before departure, at departure and after departure significantly affected the number of participants in the movement, demonstrating that decision-making was time-distributed in the studied cattle group.  
  Address INRA, UR 1213 Herbivores, Saint-Gens-Champanelle, France; Dpartement Ecologie, Physiologie et Ethologie, IPHC, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universit de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH Editor  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4992  
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Author (up) Amant, R. St.; Horton, T.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Revisiting the definition of animal tool use Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 1199-1208  
  Keywords cognition; tool use  
  Abstract Benjamin Beck's definition of tool use has served the field of animal cognition well for over 25 years (Beck 1980, Animal Tool Behavior: the Use and Manufacture of Tools, New York, Garland STPM). This article proposes a new, more explanatory definition that accounts for tool use in terms of two complementary subcategories of behaviours: behaviours aimed at altering a target object by mechanical means and behaviours that mediate the flow of information between the tool user and the environment or other organisms in the environment. The conceptual foundation and implications of the new definition are contrasted with those of existing definitions, particularly Beck's. The new definition is informally evaluated with respect to a set of scenarios that highlights differences from Beck's definition as well as those of others in the literature.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5861  
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Author (up) Amdam, G.V.; Csondes, A.; Fondrk, M.K.; Page, R.E.J. doi  openurl
  Title Complex social behaviour derived from maternal reproductive traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 439 Issue 7072 Pages 76-78  
  Keywords Aging/physiology; Animals; Bees/*physiology; *Evolution; Feeding Behavior/*physiology; Female; Infertility, Female; Maternal Behavior/*physiology; Ovary/physiology; Pollen/metabolism; Reproduction/*physiology; *Social Behavior  
  Abstract A fundamental goal of sociobiology is to explain how complex social behaviour evolves, especially in social insects, the exemplars of social living. Although still the subject of much controversy, recent theoretical explanations have focused on the evolutionary origins of worker behaviour (assistance from daughters that remain in the nest and help their mother to reproduce) through expression of maternal care behaviour towards siblings. A key prediction of this evolutionary model is that traits involved in maternal care have been co-opted through heterochronous expression of maternal genes to result in sib-care, the hallmark of highly evolved social life in insects. A coupling of maternal behaviour to reproductive status evolved in solitary insects, and was a ready substrate for the evolution of worker-containing societies. Here we show that division of foraging labour among worker honey bees (Apis mellifera) is linked to the reproductive status of facultatively sterile females. We thereby identify the evolutionary origin of a widely expressed social-insect behavioural syndrome, and provide a direct demonstration of how variation in maternal reproductive traits gives rise to complex social behaviour in non-reproductive helpers.  
  Address Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. Gro.Amdam@asu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-4687 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16397498 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 531  
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Author (up) Amé, J.-M.; Halloy, J.; Rivault, C.; Detrain, C.; Deneubourg, J.L. doi  openurl
  Title Collegial decision making based on social amplification leads to optimal group formation Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.  
  Volume 103 Issue 15 Pages 5835-5840  
  Keywords Animals; Blattellidae/*physiology; Choice Behavior; Decision Making; Leadership; *Social Behavior  
  Abstract Group-living animals are often faced with choosing between one or more alternative resource sites. A central question in such collective decision making includes determining which individuals induce the decision and when. This experimental and theoretical study of shelter selection by cockroach groups demonstrates that choices can emerge through nonlinear interaction dynamics between equal individuals without perfect knowledge or leadership. We identify a simple mechanism whereby a decision is taken on the move with limited information and signaling and without comparison of available opportunities. This mechanism leads to optimal mean benefit for group individuals. Our model points to a generic self-organized collective decision-making process independent of animal species.  
  Address Service d'Ecologie Sociale CP231, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F. D. Roosevelt 50, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16581903 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2042  
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Author (up) American Museum of Natural History url  openurl
  Title American Museum of Natural History Type Book Whole
  Year 1914 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Museum of Natural History Place of Publication New York Editor  
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  Notes Biodiversity Heritage Library Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5442  
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Author (up) Amsterdam BK openurl 
  Title Mirror self-image reactions before age two Type Journal Article
  Year 1972 Publication Dev. Psychol. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 297  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2976  
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Author (up) Andersen, N.H.; Norgaard, A.; Jensen, T.J.; Ulstrup, J. url  openurl
  Title Sequential unfolding of the two-domain protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c4 Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 88 Issue 3-4 Pages 316-327  
  Keywords P. stutzeri cytochrome c4; Sequential unfolding; Di-haem protein; Unfolding  
  Abstract P. stutzeri cytochrome c4 is a di-haem protein, composed of two globular domains each with His-Met coordinated haem, and a hydrogen bond network between the domains. The domain foldings are highly symmetric but with specific differences including structural differences of ligand coordination, and different spin states of the oxidised haem groups. We have studied unfolding of oxidised P. stutzeri cyt c4 induced thermally and by chemical denaturants. Horse heart cyt c was a reference molecule. Isothermal unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride and acid was followed by Soret, α/β, and 701-nm band absorption, and by far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. Multifarious patterns emerge, but the two domains clearly unfold sequentially. One phase, assigned to unfolding of the N-terminal domain, proceeds at guanidinium concentrations up to [approximate]1.0 M. This is followed by two overlapping phases at higher concentrations. The intermediate state maintains Fe-Met coordination, assigned to the C-terminal domain. Interdomain interaction is reflected in decreasing values of the cooperativity parameters. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a single peak, but two peaks appear when guanidinium chloride up to 0.4 M is present. This reflects different chemical action in chemical and thermal unfolding. Acid-induced unfolding kinetics was addressed by pH jumps using diode array stopped-flow techniques. Three kinetic phases in the 701 nm Fe-Met marker band, and four phases in the Soret and α/β bands, spanning 4-1000 ms could be distinguished on pH jumps from 7.5 to the range 2.5-3.5. In this range of time and pH cyt c appears to unfold in no more than two phases. Spectral properties of the kinetic intermediates could be identified. Sequential domain unfolding, formation of high-spin states, and an intermediate state with Fe-Met coordination to a single haem group are features of the unfolding kinetics.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 3973  
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Author (up) Anderson , M.C.;Shettleworth, S.J. doi  openurl
  Title Behavioral adaptation to fixed-interval and fixed-time food delivery in golden hamsters Type Journal Article
  Year 1977 Publication Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) Abbreviated Journal J Exp Anal Behav  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 33-49  
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  Abstract Food-deprived golden hamsters in a large enclosure received food every 30 sec contingent on lever pressing, or free while their behavior was continuously recorded in terms of an exhaustive classification of motor patterns. As with other species in other situations, behavior became organized into two main classes. One (terminal behaviors) increased in probability throughout interfood intervals; the other (interim behaviors) peaked earlier in interfood intervals. Which class an activity belonged to was independent of whether food was contingent on lever pressing. When food was omitted on some of the intervals (thwarting), the terminal activities began sooner in the next interval, and different interim activities changed in different ways. The interim activities did not appear to be schedule-induced in the usual sense. Rather, the hamsters left the area of the feeder when food was not due and engaged in activities they would normally perform in the experimental environment.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-5002 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16811980 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 388  
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Author (up) Anderson B. doi  openurl
  Title Dendrites and cognition: A negative pilot study in the rat Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Intelligence Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 291-308  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 3453  
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