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Author (up) Artzy-Randrup, Y.; Fleishman, S.J.; Ben-Tal, N.; Stone, L. doi  openurl
  Title Comment on “Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks” and “Superfamilies of Evolved and Designed Networks” Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 305 Issue 5687 Pages 1107c  
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  Notes 10.1126/science.1099334 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5037  
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Author (up) Asa Cs, openurl 
  Title Sociosexual behavior in the domestic pony Type Conference Article
  Year 1979 Publication Symposium on the Ecology and Behavior of Wild and Feral Equids Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 59-70  
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  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Univ. of Wyoming. Place of Publication Laramie Editor  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes from Professor Hans Klingels Equine Reference List Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 900  
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Author (up) Asa, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Male reproductive success in free-ranging feral horses Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Abbreviated Journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology  
  Volume 47 Issue 1-2 Pages 89-93  
  Keywords Key words Reproductive success; Alternative mating strategies; Mating systems; Paternity  
  Abstract In the social organization of feral horses, adult males compete to monopolize groups or bands of females, sometimes called harems. Alternative male strategies are to remain alone or with other bachelors or, less commonly, to accept subordinate status within a harem. The hypothesis that dominant harem stallion status confers a reproductive advantage was tested in free-ranging feral horses. The presence of foals in harems headed by vasectomized (VSX) versus intact stallions was used to assess the ability of these stallions to control reproduction in their harems. Of harems headed by VSX stallions, 17 and 33% contained foals during years 2 and 3 post-treatment, respectively. In contrast, 86 and 80% of harems headed by non-VSX stallions contained foals in those years. Acquisition of pregnant mares appeared more likely than sneak copulations by bachelor stallions to account for foals in harems with a single stallion. However, most foals were born into harems that included a subordinate stallion, an occurrence that was undoubtedly exacerbated by the extended breeding season resulting from the sterility of the harem stallion. Thus, in comparing alternative reproductive tactics, bachelors appeared less successful than subordinate stallions within a harem. However, the highest reproductive success was achieved by the harem stallion, further demonstrating that alternative tactics are not equally profitable.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer-Verlag Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5786  
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Author (up) Asa, C.S.; Goldfoot, D.A.; Garcia, M.C.; Ginther, O.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dexamethasone suppression of sexual behavior in the ovariectomized mare Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Hormones and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Horm Behav  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 55-64  
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  Abstract The influence of steroids of adrenal cortical origin on estrous behavior in the ovariectomized mare was evaluated by adrenal suppression via dexamethasone (DEX) administration in two experiments. In Experiment I, 12 mares (six DEX, six control) were tested for sexual behavior in harem groups (two DEX and two control mares plus one stallion per group) for 9 consecutive days. In Experiment II, estradiol (E2) was given to a group of DEX-treated mares as an additional control. Twelve mares (four DEX, four DEX + E2, and four control) were tested in harem groups (one DEX, one DEX + E2, and one control mare plus one stallion per group) for 10 days. All DEX mares showed a clear suppression of sexual response compared to control or DEX + E2 mares, indicating that the estrous behavior seen in ovariectomized mares may be due to steroids from the adrenal cortex. The control and DEX + E2 mares were similar in all measures of proceptivity. Despite being more receptive, as indicated by fewer negative responses, the DEX + E2 mares received fewer intromissions and ejaculations than did the control animals. The ability of estradiol to induce estrous behavior in the dexamethasone-suppressed mare notwithstanding, other adrenal steroids, e.g., androgens, may be involved in estrous behavior in the untreated, ovariectomized mare.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0018-506x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5360  
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Author (up) Asa, C.S.; Goldfoot, D.A.; Garcia, M.C.; Ginther, O.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sexual behavior in ovariectomized and seasonally anovulatory pony mares (Equus caballus) Type Journal Article
  Year 1980 Publication Hormones and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Horm Behav  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 46-54  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Ten ovariectomized (OVEX) and ten intact, but seasonally anovulatory (ANOV), pony mares were observed for sexual activity with five stallions, using a “harem group” social testing paradigm (two OVEX and two ANOV mares plus one stallion per group) for 15 consecutive daily tests lasting 20 min each. All mares in both conditions showed proceptive behavior in at least one test, all mares but one were mounted, and 14 of 20 mares received ejaculations. No statistical differences were found between the two conditions for any measure of proceptivity, copulatory activity, or days in estrus. The quality of estrus was judged to be equivalent to that displayed by periovulatory mares during their initial and terminal days of estrus, but less intense than that seen near ovulation. Mares in both groups were in estrus during approximately 60-70% of the tests and only 3 of the 20 mares were sexually refractory for more than five consecutive tests. Thus, the typical 2-week phase of sexual refractoriness seen in intact diestrous mares was absent in OVEX and ANOV mares, suggesting that the ovary plays a major role in actively suppressing estrous responses during the luteal phase of the cycle.  
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  ISSN 0018-506x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5361  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Asa, C.S.; Goldfoot, D.A.; Ginther, O.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sociosexual behavior and the ovulatory cycle of ponies (Equus caballus) observed in harem groups Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Hormones and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Horm Behav  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 49-65  
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  Abstract Observations of sociosexual behavior of adult ponies, made on two harem groups (each comprised of one vasectomized male and three females), were correlated with follicular development and ovulation for a total of 15 cycles (minimum of 2 cycles per female). Mean cycle length (interovulatory interval) was found to be 19.7 days, with behavioral estrus lasting 7-8 days (5.5 days preovulatory; 2.3 days postovulatory). Estrous females typically showed increased frequencies of approaching and following the stallion, urinating, presenting, clitoral winking, and tail raising. Approaching and following the stallion appeared earlier and persisted longer than other estrous responses. Deviations from the modal estrous pattern included cycles with subestrus, continual estrus, behavioral estrus in the absence of ovulation, and displays of female mounting. Dominance tests revealed that a mare's status was unaffected by the phases of the estrous cycle. The presence of more than one estrous female affected the copulatory performance of both stallions, most notably in reduced latencies to first mount, intromission, and ejaculation, in spite of differences between the stallions in sexual vigor. Each stallion usually selected the dominant mare for copulation when there were multiple estrous females present, but mounts were not displayed exclusively to one female per test. The social testing situation made apparent the importance of use of space in sociosexual communication in this species, particularly in avoidance of the stallion by diestrous mares and standing alone or in proximity to him by estrous mares.  
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  ISSN 0018-506x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5363  
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Author (up) Ash, C.; Chin, G.; Pennisi, E.; Sugden, A. doi  openurl
  Title Living in Societies Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 317 Issue 5843 Pages 1337-  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4246  
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Author (up) Assersohn, C.; Whiten, A.; Kiwede, Z.T.; Tinka, J.; Karamagi, J. doi  openurl
  Title Use of leaves to inspect ectoparasites in wild chimpanzees: a third cultural variant? Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Primates Abbreviated Journal Primates  
  Volume 45 Issue 4 Pages 255-258  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Wild/physiology; Ape Diseases/*parasitology; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Ectoparasitic Infestations/parasitology/*veterinary; Female; Grooming/*physiology; Male; Pan troglodytes/*physiology; *Plant Leaves; Protozoa/*isolation & purification; Uganda  
  Abstract We report 26 cases of using leaves as tools with which wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) in the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda, appeared to inspect objects removed during grooming. Careful removal of potential ectoparasites and delicate lip or manual placement on leaves followed by intense visual examination characterised this behaviour. It appears to be done to judge whether either ingestion or discarding is most appropriate, the former occurring in most cases. This behaviour may represent a third variant of ectoparasite handling, different from those described at Tai and Gombe, yet sharing features with the latter. These two East African techniques may thus have evolved from leaf grooming.  
  Address Scottish Primate Research Group, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9JU, Fife, UK  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0032-8332 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15179558 Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 733  
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Author (up) Astié, A.A.; Kacelnik, A.; Reboreda, J.C. doi  openurl
  Title Sexual differences in memory in shiny cowbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 77-82  
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  Abstract Avian brood parasites depend on other species, the hosts, to raise their offspring. During the breeding season, parasitic cowbirds (Molothrus sp.) search for potential host nests to which they return for laying a few days after first locating them. Parasitic cowbirds have a larger hippocampus/telencephalon volume than non-parasitic species; this volume is larger in the sex involved in nest searching (females) and it is also larger in the breeding than in the non-breeding season. In nature, female shiny cowbirds Molothrus bonariensis search for nests without the male's assistance. Here we test whether, in association with these neuroanatomical and behavioural differences, shiny cowbirds display sexual differences in a memory task in the laboratory. We used a task consisting of finding food whose location was indicated either by the appearance or the location of a covering disk. Females learnt to retrieve food faster than males when food was associated with appearance cues, but we found no sexual differences when food was associated with a specific location. Our results are consistent with the view that parasitism and its neuroanatomical correlates affect performance in memory tasks, but the effects we found were not in the expected direction, emphasising that the nature of avian hippocampal function and its sexual differences are not yet understood.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3158  
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Author (up) Atock, M.A.; Williams, R.B. openurl 
  Title Welfare of competition horses Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Revue Scientifique et Technique (International Office of Epizootics) Abbreviated Journal Rev Sci Tech  
  Volume 13 Issue 1 Pages 217-232  
  Keywords *Animal Welfare; Animals; Doping in Sports; Ethics; Heat; Horses/*physiology; Housing, Animal/standards; Humidity; International Cooperation; Sports/*standards; Transportation/standards; Veterinary Medicine  
  Abstract In the large majority of cases and circumstances, horses benefit from their association with man. However, abuse of horses can occur, due to neglect or through the pressures of competition. The welfare of all animals, including competition horses, has become increasingly topical over the past ten years. Equestrian sport is coming under closer public scrutiny due to reports of apparent abuse. The bodies responsible for regulating these sports strenuously endeavour to protect the welfare of horses which compete under their rules and regulations. The Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI: International Equestrian Federation) is the sole authority for all international events in dressage, show-jumping, three-day event, driving, endurance riding and vaulting. The FEI rules illustrate the ways in which the welfare of competing horses is safeguarded.  
  Address Federation Equestre Internationale, Lausanne, Switzerland  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0253-1933 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:8173097 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3747  
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