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Author (up) Anderson JR openurl 
  Title The development of self-recognition: a review Type Journal Article
  Year 1984 Publication Dev. Psychobiol. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 17 Issue Pages 35  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2977  
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Author (up) Anderson JR; Gallup GG openurl 
  Title Self-recognition in Saguinus? A critical essay Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Animal Behaviour. Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 54 Issue Pages 1563  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2978  
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Author (up) Anderson, C.; Franks, N.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Teams in animal societies Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Behav. Ecol.  
  Volume 12 Issue 5 Pages 534-540  
  Keywords animal societies, cooperation, division of labor, groups, invertebrates, task types, teams, vertebrates  
  Abstract We review the existence of teams in animal societies. Teams have previously been dismissed in all but a tiny minority of insect societies. “Team” is a term not generally used in studies of vertebrates. We propose a new rigorous definition of a team that may be applied to both vertebrate and invertebrate societies. We reconsider what it means to work as a team or group and suggest that there are many more teams in insect societies than previously thought. A team task requires different subtasks to be performed concurrently for successful completion. There is a division of labor within a team. Contrary to previous reviews of teams in social insects, we do not constrain teams to consist of members of different castes and argue that team members may be interchangeable. Consequently, we suggest that a team is simply the set of individuals that performs a team task. We contrast teams with groups and suggest that a group task requires the simultaneous performance and cooperation of two or more individuals for successful completion. In a group, there is no division of labor--each individual performs the same task. We also contrast vertebrate and invertebrate teams and find that vertebrate teams tend to be associated with hunting and are based on individual recognition. Invertebrate teams occur in societies characterized by a great deal of redundancy, and we predict that teams in insect societies are more likely to be found in large polymorphic (“complex”) societies than in small monomorphic (“simple”) societies.  
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  Notes 10.1093/beheco/12.5.534 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 2070  
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Author (up) Anderson, G.D. ; Herlocker,D.J. url  openurl
  Title Soil factors affecting the distribution of the vegetation types and their utilization by wild animals in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. Type Journal Article
  Year 1973 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Ecol  
  Volume 61 Issue Pages 627-651  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2217  
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Author (up) Anderson, G.D.;Talbot, L.M. url  openurl
  Title Soil factors affecting distribution of the grassland types and their utilization by wild animals on the Serengeti Plains Type Journal Article
  Year 1965 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Ecol  
  Volume 53 Issue Pages 1  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2216  
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Author (up) Anderson, J.R. doi  openurl
  Title Self-recognition in dolphins: credible cetaceans; compromised criteria, controls, and conclusions Type Journal Article
  Year 1995 Publication Consciousness and Cognition Abbreviated Journal Conscious Cogn  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 239-243  
  Keywords Animal Communication; Animals; *Awareness; Discrimination Learning; Dolphins/*psychology; Female; Male; Orientation; *Self Concept; Social Behavior; *Television; *Visual Perception  
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  Address Laboratoire de Psychophysiologie, CNRS URA 1295, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France  
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  ISSN 1053-8100 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:8521263 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4163  
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Author (up) Anderson, J.R.; Fornasieri, I.; Ludes, E.; Roeder, J.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social processes and innovative behaviour in changing groups of lemur fulvus Type Journal Article
  Year 1992 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav. Process.  
  Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 101-112  
  Keywords Social learning; Lemur fulvus; Dominance; Individual differences  
  Abstract A group of brown lemurs was presented with one or two baited food-boxes requiring a specific type of motor response in order to be opened. Subsequently, four groups containing different combinations of experienced individuals from the original group and naive individuals were tested. Solutions to the problem and access to the food were recorded and considered in relation to social factors. In the original group, two adult males learned to open the boxes, with one male increasingly preventing the other from approaching. In the second group, with the subordinate male and certain females removed, the dominant male tolerated successful performances by a juvenile female. Group 3 consisted of three passive female participants from the original group and a naive female; one of the three original females now became the sole box-opener. The introduction of the subordinate male from the original group into the all-female group led to a sharing of box-opening by this subject and the skilled female. In the final group, intense aggression toward the skilled female by a new, naive adult male resulted in two previously passive females succeeding on some occasions. In lemurs, at least some `scroungers' appear able to learn to perform a new act when the social context permits.  
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  Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 576  
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Author (up) Anderson, J.R.; Kuroshima, H.; Kuwahata, H.; Fujita, K. doi  openurl
  Title Do squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) predict that looking leads to touching? Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 185-192  
  Keywords Animals; Association Learning; *Attention; Cebus/*psychology; Cognition; *Concept Formation; Cues; Fixation, Ocular; Humans; *Nonverbal Communication; Recognition (Psychology); Saimiri/*psychology; Social Behavior; Species Specificity  
  Abstract Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) were tested using an expectancy violation procedure to assess whether they use an actor's gaze direction, signaled by congruent head and eye orientation, to predict subsequent behavior. The monkeys visually habituated to a repeated sequence in which the actor (a familiar human or a puppet) looked at an object and then picked it up, but they did not react strongly when the actor looked at an object but then picked up another object. Capuchin monkeys' responses in the puppet condition were slightly more suggestive of expectancy. There was no differential responding to congruent versus incongruent look-touch sequences when familiarization trials were omitted. The weak findings contrast with a strongly positive result previously reported for tamarin monkeys. Additional evidence is required before concluding that behavior prediction based on gaze cues typifies primates; other approaches for studying how they process attention cues are indicated.  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, FK9 4LA, Stirling, Scotland. jra1@stir.ac.uk  
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  ISSN 1435-9448 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:15022054 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2540  
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Author (up) Anderson, J.R.; Kuwahata, H.; Fujita, K. doi  openurl
  Title Gaze alternation during “pointing” by squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus)? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 267-271  
  Keywords *Animal Communication; Animals; *Attention; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; *Cues; Female; Humans; *Learning; Male; Saimiri/*physiology  
  Abstract Gaze alternation (GA) is considered a hallmark of pointing in human infants, a sign of intentionality underlying the gesture. GA has occasionally been observed in great apes, and reported only anecdotally in a few monkeys. Three squirrel monkeys that had previously learned to reach toward out-of-reach food in the presence of a human partner were videotaped while the latter visually attended to the food, a distractor object, or the ceiling. Frame-by-frame video analysis revealed that, especially when reaching toward the food, the monkeys rapidly and repeatedly switched between looking at the partner's face and the food. This type of GA suggests that the monkeys were communicating with the partner. However, the monkeys' behavior was not influenced by changes in the partner's focus of attention.  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK. jra1@stir.ac.uk  
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  Notes PMID:17242934 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2424  
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Author (up) Anderson, M.K.; Friend, T.H.; Evans, J.W.; Bushong, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioral assessment of horses in therapeutic riding programs Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.  
  Volume 63 Issue 1 Pages 11-24  
  Keywords Horses; Therapeutic riding; Temperament; Cortisol; Catecholamines  
  Abstract A behavioral assessment of horses who were being used and not used in therapeutic riding programs was conducted to help determine useful methods of selecting horses for use in therapeutic riding programs. A total of 103 horses (76 horses from five therapeutic riding centers and 27 non-therapeutic riding horses from four sites) were used. Temperament survey for each horse were completed by three riding instructors at each therapeutic riding center or by the individual most knowledgeable about the horse at the other sites. Twenty personality traits from the survey were used to quantify temperament. Concentrations of plasma cortisol, norepinephrine and epinephrine were also measured in each horse. A reactivity test was then conducted which involved introducing three novel stimuli: a walking and vocalizing toy pig placed on a cardboard surface in front of the horse for 20 s; popping a balloon near the horse's flank area; and suddenly opening an umbrella and holding it open in front of the horse for 20 s. Reactions (expressions, vocalizations and movement) to each of the stimuli were scored and used to calculate an average reactivity score for each horse. The therapeutic riding instructors did not often agree on the temperament of their center's horses. The personality trait ratings made by the therapeutic riding instructors at each center were on average significantly correlated (P<0.01, r>0.52) for only 37.8% of the horses for any two instructors and 7.8% for three instructors. No significant correlations were found between temperament, reactivity, and the hormone concentrations (r<0.19), but regression analysis indicated a possibility of predicting temperament from the reactivity score and hormone concentrations (P<0.08). There was also a tendency for relationships between extremes in temperament (desirable vs. undesirable) and the hormone concentrations (P<0.09), and between extremes in reactivity (low vs. high) and the hormone concentrations (P=0.08). The difference in ratings among riding instructors indicates a need for more collaboration between instructors when evaluating horse temperament. This study also indicates that it was very difficult to objectively determine the suitability of horses for therapeutic riding programs regarding their temperament and reactivity, probably because other traits (e.g., smoothness of gait) are also considered very important.  
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  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4812  
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