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Author (down) Zwolinski J, openurl 
  Title Termin zapladniania klaczy a plec zrebiat Type Book Whole
  Year 0 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
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  Notes from Professor Hans Klingels Equine Reference List Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1761  
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Author (down) Zumpe, D. ; Michael, R.P. doi  openurl
  Title Dominance index: A simple measure of relative dominance status in primates Type Journal Article
  Year 1986 Publication American journal of primatology Abbreviated Journal Am. J. Primatol.  
  Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 291-300  
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  Abstract A simple measure of relative dominance status (cardinal rank) is described which we have termed the dominance index. Like more familiar techniques for assessing rank order, it is based on the direction of aggressive and submissive behaviors between all possible paired combinations of animals in a social group. Using data from five groups of female rhesus monkeys, it reliably produced the same ordinal ranks as fight interaction matrices. There was also good agreement with the cardinal ranks produced by two additional measures of dominance and with those produced by observer ratings. The dominance index can be calculated when fights have not actually occurred and is largely independent of the frequency of agonistic interactions. It has, therefore, wide application and can estimate dominance during brief sampling periods (one hour) and also in stable groups when agonistic interactions are low. Its application is described in experiments in which the male in a group of females was changed and the hormonal status of the females was altered. Estrogen increased female dominance status relative to other females.  
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  ISSN 1098-2345 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number refbase @ user @ DorisZumpe1986 Serial 871  
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Author (down) Zucca, P.; Milos, N.; Vallortigara, G. doi  openurl
  Title Piagetian object permanence and its development in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 243-258  
  Keywords Animals; *Behavior, Animal; Birds/*physiology; *Cognition; *Cues  
  Abstract Object permanence in Eurasian jays (Garrulus glandarius) was investigated using a complete version of the Uzgiris and Hunt scale 1. Nine hand-raised jays were studied, divided into two groups according to their different developmental stages (experiment 1, older jays: 2-3 months old, n = 4; experiment 2, younger jays: 15 days old, n = 5). In the first experiment, we investigated whether older jays could achieve piagetian stage 6 of object permanence. Tasks were administered in a fixed sequence (1-15) according to the protocols used in other avian species. The aim of the second experiment was to check whether testing very young jays before their development of “neophobia” could influence the achievement times of piagetian stages. Furthermore, in this experiment tasks were administered randomly to investigate whether the jays' achievement of stage 6 follows a fixed sequence related to the development of specific cognitive abilities. All jays tested in experiments 1 and 2 fully achieved piagetian stage 6 and no “A not B” errors were observed. Performance on visible displacement tasks was better than performance on invisible ones. The results of experiment 2 show that “neophobia” affected the response of jays in terms of achievement times; the older jays in experiment 1 took longer to pass all the tasks when compared with the younger, less neophobic, jays in experiment 2. With regard to the achieving order, jays followed a fixed sequence of acquisition in experiment 2, even if tasks were administered randomly, with the exception of one subject. The results of these experiments support the idea that piagetian stages of cognitive development exist in avian species and that they progress through relatively fixed sequences.  
  Address Department of Psychology, Laboratory of Animal Cognition and Comparative Neuroscience, Via S. Anastasio 12, 34100, Trieste, Italy. zucca@units.it  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1435-9448 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17242935 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2423  
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Author (down) Zucca, P.; Cerri, F.; Carluccio, A.; Baciadonna, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Space availability influence laterality in donkeys (Equus asinus) Type Journal Article
  Year Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav. Process.  
  Volume In Press, Uncorrected Proof Issue Pages  
  Keywords Cerebral lateralization; Donkey; Footedness; Welfare; Equus asinus  
  Abstract Cerebral lateralization is the portioning of the cognitive functions between the two cerebral hemispheres. Several factors, like embryological manipulations, light exposure, health conditions, sex and age can influence the left-right brain asymmetries and contribute to increasing the variability in the strength and direction of laterality within most species. We investigated the influence of an environmental constraint, namely space availability, as a new source of variation on laterality in an adult vertebrate model, the donkey. In a baseline condition we tested whether donkeys show a motor lateralization bias at population level, while in an experimental condition we manipulated space availability to verify if a reduction in this parameter could represent a new source of variation in laterality. Results show that donkeys are lateralized at population level with a strong bias to standing with the right forelimb advanced over the left and that a reduction of space availability is an important source of variation in the laterality strength and direction within this species. The comparative analysis of the environmental and developmental factors that give origin to neural and behavioural laterality in animal models will be very important for a better understanding of the evolutionary origin of such multifaceted phenomenon.  
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  ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5400  
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Author (down) Zucca, P.; Baciadonna, L.; Masci, S.; Mariscoli, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illness as a source of variation of laterality in lions (Panthera leo) Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Laterality Abbreviated Journal Laterality  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 356-366  
  Keywords Brain lateralisation; Illness; Iions; Panthera leo; Footedness  
  Abstract Brain asymmetry—i.e. the specialisation of each cerebral hemisphere for sensorimotor processing mechanisms and for specific cognitive functions—is widely distributed among vertebrates. Several factors, such as embryological manipulations, sex, age, and breeds, can influence the maintenance, strength, and direction of laterality within a certain vertebrate species. Brain lateralisation is a universal phenomenon characterising not only cerebral control of cognitive or emotion-related functions but also cerebral regulation of somatic processes, and its evolution is strongly influenced by social selection pressure. Diseases are well known to be a cost of sociality but their role in influencing behaviour has received very little attention. The present study investigates the influence of illness conditions as a source of variation on laterality in a social keystone vertebrate predator model, the lion. In a preliminary stage, the clinical conditions of 24 adult lions were assessed. The same animals were scored for forelimb preference when in the quadrupedal standing position. Lions show a marked forelimb preference with a population bias towards the use of the right forelimb. Illness conditions strongly influenced the strength of laterality bias, with a significant difference between clinically healthy and sick lions. According to these results, health conditions should be recognised as an important source of variation in brain lateralisation.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Psychology Press Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1357-650x ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5372  
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Author (down) Zucca, P.; Antonelli, F.; Vallortigara, G. doi  openurl
  Title Detour behaviour in three species of birds: quails (Coturnix sp.), herring gulls (Larus cachinnans) and canaries (Serinus canaria) Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages 122-128  
  Keywords Animals; *Avoidance Learning; *Birds; Canaries; Charadriiformes; Coturnix; *Discrimination Learning; Orientation; *Space Perception; *Spatial Behavior; Species Specificity  
  Abstract Detour behaviour is the ability of an animal to reach a goal stimulus by moving round any interposed obstacle. It has been widely studied and has been proposed as a test of insight learning in several species of mammals, but few data are available in birds. A comparative study in three species of birds, belonging to different eco-ethological niches, allows a better understanding of the cognitive mechanism of such detour behaviour. Young quails (Coturnix sp.), herring gulls (Larus cachinnans) and canaries (Serinus canaria), 1 month old, 10-25 days old and 4-6 months old, respectively, were tested in a detour situation requiring them to abandon a clear view of a biologically interesting object (their own reflection in a mirror) in order to approach that object. Birds were placed in a closed corridor, at one end of which was a barrier through which the object was visible. Four different types of barrier were used: vertical bar, horizontal bar, grid and transparent. Two symmetrical apertures placed midline in the corridor allowed the birds to adopt routes passing around the barrier. After entering the apertures, birds could turn either right or left to re-establish social contact with the object in the absence of any local sensory cues emanating from it. Quails appeared able to solve the task, though their performance depended on the type of barrier used, which appeared to modulate their relative interest in approaching the object or in exploring the surroundings. Young herring gulls also showed excellent abilities to locate spatially the out-of-view object, except when the transparent barrier was used. Canaries, on the other hand, appeared completely unable to solve the detour task, whatever barrier was in use. It is suggested that these species differences can be accounted for in terms of adaptation to a terrestrial or aerial environment.  
  Address Laboratory of Animal Cognition and Comparative Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, University of Trieste, Via S. Anastasio 12, 34100, Trieste, Italy. zucca@units.it  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1435-9448 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15449104 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 2506  
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Author (down) Zuberbühler, K. doi  openurl
  Title Predator-specific alarm calls in Campbell's monkeys, Cercopithecus campbelli Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol.  
  Volume 50 Issue 5 Pages 414-422  
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  Abstract One of the most prominent behavioural features of many forest primates are the loud calls given by the adult males. Early observational studies repeatedly postulated that these calls function in intragroup spacing or intergroup avoidance. More recent field experiments with Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) of Taï Forest, Ivory Coast, have clearly shown that loud male calls function as predator alarm calls because calls reliably (1) label different predator classes and (2) convey semantic information about the predator type present. Here, I test the alarm call hypothesis another primate, the Campbell's monkey (C. campbelli). Like Diana monkeys, male Campbell's monkeys produce conspicuous loud calls to crowned hawk eagles (Stephanoaetus coronatus) and leopards (Panthera pardus), two of their main predators. Playback experiments showed that monkeys responded to the predator category represented by the different playback stimuli, regardless of whether they consisted of (1) vocalisations of the actual predators (crowned hawk eagle shrieks or leopard growls), (2) alarm calls to crowned hawk eagles or leopards given by other male Campbell's monkeys or (3) alarm calls to crowned hawk eagles or leopards given by sympatric male Diana monkeys. These experiments provide further evidence that non-human primates have evolved the cognitive capacity to produce and respond to referential labels for external events.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 3116  
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Author (down) Zolovick, A.; Upson, D.W.; Eleftheriou, B.E. url  openurl
  Title Diurnal Variation In Plasma Glucocorticosteroid Levels In The Horse (Equus Caballus) Type Journal Article
  Year 1966 Publication Journal of Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal J. Endocrinol.  
  Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 249-253  
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  Abstract Thin-layer chromatography, acetylation of reference and unidentified glucocorticosteroids, u.v. absorption and fluorescence induced in sulphuric acid were used to identify cortisol as the major free plasma glucocorticosteroid in the horse (Equus caballus), with cortisone and corticosterone as minor glucocorticosteroids. Deoxycorticosterone was also identified. The plasma ratio for free cortisol: cortisone: corticosterone was 16:8:0·5.The diurnal variation was determined for all three glucocorticosteroids. The highest levels of cortisol and corticosterone were found at 10.00 hr. (260 and 10·3 μg./100 ml., respectively) and the lowest concentration of cortisol at 02.00 hr. The highest level of cortisone occurred at 02.00 hr. (140 μg./100 ml.), and the lowest appeared at 16.00 hr. (65 μg./100 ml.). The maximum plasma concentration of the combined glucocorticosteroids was found at 10.00 hr. (395·3 μg./100 ml.), and the minimum at 20.00 hr. (219 μg./100 ml.).  
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  Notes 10.1677/joe.0.0350249 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5591  
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Author (down) Zohary, D.; Tchernov, E.; Horwitz, L.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of unconscious selection in the domestication of sheep and goats Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication J Zool Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 245 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Zohary1998 Serial 6240  
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Author (down) Zlatanova, D.; Ahmed, A.; Valasseva, A.; Genov, P. openurl 
  Title Adaptive Diet Strategy of the Wolf (Canis lupus L.) in Europe: a Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication ACTA ZOOLOGICA BULGARICA Abbreviated Journal Acta zool. bulg.  
  Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages 439-452  
  Keywords Wolf, Canis lupus, prey, adaptive strategy  
  Abstract The diet strategy of the wolf in Europe is reviewed on the basis of 74 basic and 14 additional literature
sources. The comparative analysis reveals clear dependence on the latitude (and, therefore, on the changing
environmental conditions) correlated with the wild ungulate abundance and diversity. Following a
geographic pattern, the wolf is specialised on different species of ungulates: moose and reindeer in Scandinavia,
red deer in Central and Eastern Europe and wild boar in Southern Europe. Where this large prey
is taken, the roe deer is hunted with almost the same frequency in every region. The wolf diet in Europe
shows two ecological adaptations formed by a complex of variables: 1. Wolves living in natural habitats
with abundance of wild ungulates feed mainly on wild prey. 2. In highly anthropogenic habitats, with low
abundance of wild prey, wolves feed on livestock (where husbandry of domestic animals is available) and
take also a lot of plant food, smaller prey (hares and rodents) and garbage food. The frequency of occurrence
of wild ungulates in the diet of wolves in North Europe varies from 54.0% in Belarus to 132.7% in
Poland, while that of livestock is in the range from 0.4% in Norway to 74.9% in Belarus. In South Europe,
the frequency of occurrence of wild prey varies from 0% in Italy and Spain to 136.0% in Italy, while of domestic
ungulates ranges between 0% and 100% in Spain. The low density or lack of wild prey triggers the
switch of the wolf diet to livestock, plant food (32.2-85% in Italy) or even garbage (up to 41.5% in Italy).
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6388  
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