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Author Siniscalchi, M.; Padalino, B.; Aubé, L.; Quaranta, A.
Title Right-nostril use during sniffing at arousing stimuli produces higher cardiac activity in jumper horses Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition Abbreviated Journal Laterality
Volume 20 Issue 4 Pages (down) 483-500
Keywords
Abstract Lateralization in horses, Equus caballus, has been reported at both motor and sensory levels. Here we investigated left- and right-nostril use in 12 jumper horses freely sniffing different emotive stimuli. Results revealed that during sniffing at adrenaline and oestrus mare urine stimuli, horses showed a clear right-nostril bias while just a tendency in the use of the right nostril was observed during sniffing of other odours (food, cotton swab and repellent). Sniffing at adrenaline and urine odours was also accompanied by increasing cardiac activity and behavioural reactivity strengthening the role of the right hemisphere in the analysis of intense emotion and sexual behaviour.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Routledge Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1357-650x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes doi: 10.1080/1357650X.2015.1005629 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6208
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Author Dalla Costa, E.; Dai, F.; Lebelt, D.; Scholz, P.; Barbieri, S.; Canali, E.; Zanella, A.J.; Minero, M.
Title Welfare assessment of horses: the AWIN approach Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Animal Welfare Abbreviated Journal Anim. Welf.
Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages (down) 481-488
Keywords Animal-Based; Measure; Indicator; Animal Welfare; Horse; On-Farm
Abstract The EU-funded Animal Welfare Indicators (AWIN) research project (2011-2015) aimed to improve animal welfare through the development of practical on-farm animal welfare assessment protocols. The present study describes the application of the AWIN approach to the development of a welfare assessment protocol for horses (Equus caballus). Its development required the following steps: (i) selection of potential welfare indicators; (ii) bridging gaps in knowledge; (iii) consulting stakeholders; and (iv) testing a prototype protocol on-farm. Compared to existing welfare assessment protocols for other species, the AWIN welfare assessment protocol for horses introduces a number of innovative aspects, such as implementation of a two-level strategy focused on improving on-farm feasibility and the use of electronic tools to achieve standardised data collection and so promote rapid outcomes. Further refinement to the AWIN welfare assessment protocol for horses is needed in order to firstly gather data from a larger reference population and, secondly, enhance the welfare assessment protocol with reference to different horse housing and husbandry conditions.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6406
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Author Krange, O.; Skogen, K.
Title When the lads go hunting: The 'Hammertown mechanism' and the conflict over wolves in Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Ethnography Abbreviated Journal Ethnography
Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages (down) 466-489
Keywords
Abstract Rural communities are changing. Depopulation and unemployment is accompanied by the advance of new perspectives on nature, where protection trumps resource extraction. These developments are perceived as threatening by rural working-class people with close ties to traditional land use ? a situation they often meet with cultural resistance. Cultural resistance is not necessarily launched against institutionalized power, nor does it necessarily imply a desire for fundamental social change. It should rather be seen as a struggle for autonomy. However, autonomy does not entail influence outside the cultural realm. Struggles to uphold traditional rural lifestyles ? for example by denouncing the current nature conservation regime ? could be understood in much the same conceptual framework as Willis employed in ?Learning to labour?. Based on an ethnographic study of the conflicts over wolf protection, we demonstrate that ?the Hammertown mechanism? is of a more general nature than often implied in the discussion of Willis? work.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Publications Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1466-1381 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes doi: 10.1177/1466138110397227 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6425
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Author López-Bao, J.V.; Sazatornil, V.; Llaneza, L.; Rodríguez, A.
Title Indirect Effects on Heathland Conservation and Wolf Persistence of Contradictory Policies that Threaten Traditional Free-Ranging Horse Husbandry Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Conservation Letters Abbreviated Journal Conservation Letters
Volume 6 Issue 6 Pages (down) 448-455
Keywords Farmland biodiversity; heathlands; integration of environmental policies; management of livestock carcasses; traditional land uses; wolf conservation
Abstract Conservation agencies within the European Union promote the restoration of traditional land uses as a cost-effective way to preserve biodiversity outside reserves. Although the European Union pursues the integration of the environment into strategic decision-making, it also dictates sectoral policies that may damage farmland biodiversity. We illustrate this point by outlining the socioeconomic factors that allow the persistence of traditional free-ranging horse husbandry in Galicia, northwestern Spain. Free-ranging Galician mountain ponies provide ecological and socioeconomic services including the prevention of forest fires, the maintenance of heathlands and wolves, and the attenuation of wolf-human conflicts. This traditional livestock system may have persisted because it entails negligible costs for farmers. Wolf predation upon Galician mountain ponies does not threaten farmer's economies and seems to be tolerated better than attacks to more valuable stock. Recently, European Union's regulations on animal welfare, carcass management, or meat production put new economic and administrative burdens on farmers, make free-ranging horse rearing economically unsustainable, and incentivize its abandonment. The aim of the European Union to integrate environmental policies may be successful to preserve farmland biodiversity only through careful anticipation of the side effects of apparently unrelated regulations on the fragile equilibrium that sustain traditional land uses.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6211
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Author Zlatanova, D.; Ahmed, A.; Valasseva, A.; Genov, P.
Title Adaptive Diet Strategy of the Wolf (Canis lupus L.) in Europe: a Review Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication ACTA ZOOLOGICA BULGARICA Abbreviated Journal Acta zool. bulg.
Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages (down) 439-452
Keywords Wolf, Canis lupus, prey, adaptive strategy
Abstract The diet strategy of the wolf in Europe is reviewed on the basis of 74 basic and 14 additional literature

sources. The comparative analysis reveals clear dependence on the latitude (and, therefore, on the changing

environmental conditions) correlated with the wild ungulate abundance and diversity. Following a

geographic pattern, the wolf is specialised on different species of ungulates: moose and reindeer in Scandinavia,

red deer in Central and Eastern Europe and wild boar in Southern Europe. Where this large prey

is taken, the roe deer is hunted with almost the same frequency in every region. The wolf diet in Europe

shows two ecological adaptations formed by a complex of variables: 1. Wolves living in natural habitats

with abundance of wild ungulates feed mainly on wild prey. 2. In highly anthropogenic habitats, with low

abundance of wild prey, wolves feed on livestock (where husbandry of domestic animals is available) and

take also a lot of plant food, smaller prey (hares and rodents) and garbage food. The frequency of occurrence

of wild ungulates in the diet of wolves in North Europe varies from 54.0% in Belarus to 132.7% in

Poland, while that of livestock is in the range from 0.4% in Norway to 74.9% in Belarus. In South Europe,

the frequency of occurrence of wild prey varies from 0% in Italy and Spain to 136.0% in Italy, while of domestic

ungulates ranges between 0% and 100% in Spain. The low density or lack of wild prey triggers the

switch of the wolf diet to livestock, plant food (32.2-85% in Italy) or even garbage (up to 41.5% in Italy).
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6388
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Author Burke, C.; Rashman, M.; Wich, S.; Symons, A.; Theron, C.; Longmore, S.
Title Optimizing observing strategies for monitoring animals using drone-mounted thermal infrared cameras Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages (down) 439-467
Keywords
Abstract ABSTRACTThe proliferation of relatively affordable off-the-shelf drones offers great opportunities for wildlife monitoring and conservation. Similarly the recent reduction in the cost of thermal infrared cameras also offers new promise in this field, as they have the advantage over conventional RGB cameras of being able to distinguish animals based on their body heat and being able to detect animals at night. However, the use of drone-mounted thermal infrared cameras comes with several technical challenges. In this article, we address some of these issues, namely thermal contrast problems due to heat from the ground, absorption and emission of thermal infrared radiation by the atmosphere, obscuration by vegetation, and optimizing the flying height of drones for a best balance between covering a large area and being able to accurately image and identify animals of interest. We demonstrate the application of these methods with a case study using field data and make the first ever detection of the critically endangered riverine rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis) in thermal infrared data. We provide a web-tool so that the community can easily apply these techniques to other studies (http://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/aricburk/uav_calc/).
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes doi: 10.1080/01431161.2018.1558372 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6528
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Author Giraldeau, L.-A.; Lefebvre, L.; Morand-Ferron, J.
Title Can a restrictive definition lead to biases and tautologies? Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Behavioral and Brain Sciences Abbreviated Journal Behav. Brain Sci.
Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages (down) 411-412
Keywords
Abstract We argue that the operational definition proposed by Ramsey et al. does not represent a significant improvement for students of innovation, because it is so restrictive that it might actually prevent the testing of hypotheses on the relationships between innovation, ecology, evolution, culture, and intelligence. To avoid tautological thinking, we need to use an operational definition that is taxonomically unbiased and neutral with respect to the hypotheses to be tested.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2007/12/17
ISSN 0140-525x ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6533
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Author Ringhofer, M.; Yamamoto, S.
Title Erratum to: Domestic horses send signals to humans when they are faced with an unsolvable task Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Animal Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Cogn.
Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages (down) 407-407
Keywords
Abstract Some domestic animals are thought to be skilled at social communication with humans due to the process of domestication. Horses, being in close relationship with humans, similar to dogs, might be skilled at communication with humans. Previous studies have indicated that they are sensitive to bodily signals and the attentional state of humans; however, there are few studies that investigate communication with humans and responses to the knowledge state of humans. Our first question was whether and how horses send signals to their potentially helpful but ignorant caretakers in a problem-solving situation where a food item was hidden in a bucket that was accessible only to the caretakers. We then examined whether horses alter their behaviours on the basis of the caretakersí knowledge of where the food was hidden. We found that horses communicated to their caretakers using visual and tactile signals. The signalling behaviour of the horses significantly increased in conditions where the caretakers had not seen the hiding of the food. These results suggest that horses alter their communicative behaviour towards humans in accordance with humansí knowledge state.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1435-9456 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Ringhofer2017 Serial 6135
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Author Burden, F.; Thiemann, A.
Title Donkeys Are Different Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the 2015 Equine Science Society Symposium
Volume 35 Issue 5 Pages (down) 376-382
Keywords Donkey; Ass; Equid; Mule
Abstract As a unique species of equine, the donkey has certain specific variations from the horse. This review highlights the origins of the donkey and how this impacts on its behavior, physiology, and propensity to disease. The donkey is less of a flight animal and has been used by humans for pack and draught work, in areas where their ability to survive poorer diets, and transboundary disease while masking overt signs of pain and distress has made them indispensable to human livelihoods. When living as a companion animal, however, the donkey easily accumulates adipose tissue, and this may create a metabolically compromised individual prone to diseases of excess such as laminitis and hyperlipemia. They show anatomic variations from the horse especially in the hoof, upper airway, and their conformation. Variations in physiology lead to differences in the metabolism and distribution of many drugs. With over 44 million donkeys worldwide, it is important that veterinarians have the ability to understand and treat this equid effectively.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6541
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Author Birch, H.G.
Title The relation of previous experience to insightful problem-solving Type Journal Article
Year 1945 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Comp Psychol
Volume 38 Issue Pages (down) 367-383
Keywords Humans; *Problem Solving; *Psychology, Comparative; *PSYCHOLOGY/comparative
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-9940 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21010765 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6554
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