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Author To be deleted
Title The responses of horses in a discrimination problem Type Journal Article
Year 1937 Publication J. Compar. Physiol. Psychol. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 23 Issue Pages 305-333
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Notes Cited By (since 1996): 2; Export Date: 24 October 2008 Approved no
Call Number Admin @ knut @ Serial 4585
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Author Lefebvre, L.; Reader, S.M.; Sol, D.
Title Brains, Innovations and Evolution in Birds and Primates Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Brain, Behavior and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Brain. Behav. Evol.
Volume 63 Issue 4 Pages 233-246
Keywords Innovation W Brain evolution W Hyperstriatum ventrale W Neostriatum W Isocortex W Birds W Primates W Tool use W Invasion biology
Abstract Abstract

Several comparative research programs have focusedon the cognitive, life history and ecological traits thataccount for variation in brain size. We review one ofthese programs, a program that uses the reported frequencyof behavioral innovation as an operational measureof cognition. In both birds and primates, innovationrate is positively correlated with the relative size of associationareas in the brain, the hyperstriatum ventrale andneostriatum in birds and the isocortex and striatum inprimates. Innovation rate is also positively correlatedwith the taxonomic distribution of tool use, as well asinterspecific differences in learning. Some features ofcognition have thus evolved in a remarkably similar wayin primates and at least six phyletically-independent avianlineages. In birds, innovation rate is associated withthe ability of species to deal with seasonal changes in theenvironment and to establish themselves in new regions,and it also appears to be related to the rate atwhich lineages diversify. Innovation rate provides a usefultool to quantify inter-taxon differences in cognitionand to test classic hypotheses regarding the evolution ofthe brain.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0006-8977 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4738
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Author Krueger, K.
Title “Pferdehaltung und Ethologie der Pferde” im Bachelorstudiengang Pferdewirtschaft Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Forschendes Lernen initiieren, umsetzen und reflektieren Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 54-81
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Publisher UniversitätsVerlag Webler Place of Publication Bielefeld Editor : S. Lepp und C. Niederdrenk-Felgner
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN 10: 3-937026-91-6 Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5944
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Author Aberle, K.S.; Hamann, H.; Drögemüller, C.; Distl, O.
Title Genetic diversity in German draught horse breeds compared with a group of primitive, riding and wild horses by means of microsatellite DNA markers Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Animal Genetics Abbreviated Journal Anim. Gen.
Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 270-277
Keywords diversity; endangered breeds; genetic variation; horse; microsatellite
Abstract Summary We compared the genetic diversity and distance among six German draught horse breeds to wild (Przewalski's Horse), primitive (Icelandic Horse, Sorraia Horse, Exmoor Pony) or riding horse breeds (Hanoverian Warmblood, Arabian) by means of genotypic information from 30 microsatellite loci. The draught horse breeds included the South German Coldblood, Rhenish German Draught Horse, Mecklenburg Coldblood, Saxon Thuringa Coldblood, Black Forest Horse and Schleswig Draught Horse. Despite large differences in population sizes, the average observed heterozygosity (Ho) differed little among the heavy horse breeds (0.64�0.71), but was considerably lower than in the Hanoverian Warmblood or Icelandic Horse population. The mean number of alleles (NA) decreased more markedly with declining population sizes of German draught horse breeds (5.2�6.3) but did not reach the values of Hanoverian Warmblood (NA = 6.7). The coefficient of differentiation among the heavy horse breeds showed 11.6% of the diversity between the heavy horse breeds, as opposed to 21.2% between the other horse populations. The differentiation test revealed highly significant genetic differences among all draught horse breeds except the Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldbloods. The Schleswig Draught Horse was the most distinct draught horse breed. In conclusion, the study demonstrated a clear distinction among the German draught horse breeds and even among breeds with a very short history of divergence like Rhenish German Draught Horse and its East German subpopulations Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldblood.
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Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1365-2052 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5184
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Author Schino, G.; Aureli, F.
Title Reciprocity in group-living animals: partner control versus partner choice Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Biological Reviews Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev
Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 665-672
Keywords cooperation; reciprocity; partner control; partner choice; proximate mechanisms
Abstract ABSTRACT Reciprocity is probably the most debated of the evolutionary explanations for cooperation. Part of the confusion surrounding this debate stems from a failure to note that two different processes can result in reciprocity: partner control and partner choice. We suggest that the common observation that group-living animals direct their cooperative behaviours preferentially to those individuals from which they receive most cooperation is to be interpreted as the result of the sum of the two separate processes of partner control and partner choice. We review evidence that partner choice is the prevalent process in primates and propose explanations for this pattern. We make predictions that highlight the need for studies that separate the effects of partner control and partner choice in a broader variety of group-living taxa.
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Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes doi: 10.1111/brv.12248 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6411
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Author Tomkins, L.M.; McGreevy, P.D.; Branson, N.J.
Title Lack of standardization in reporting motor laterality in the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Veterinary Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 235-239
Keywords dog; motor laterality; lateralization; paw preference; standardization
Abstract Over the past 2 decades, numerous studies have been undertaken to assess motor laterality in the domestic dog. In anticipation of growth in this area of enquiry, we decided to review the literature on canine motor biases to identify any shortcomings, reflect on the lessons to be learned from and offer ways forward for future research into canine laterality. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize motor laterality findings in the dog, (ii) highlight areas lacking in standardization, and (iii) propose necessary criteria for future tests and global reporting protocols. Our review of the literature highlighted the lack of standardization between studies in task selection, sample size, number of behavior scores recorded, and the methods by which motor laterality were classified and reported. This review illustrates the benefits of standardizing methods of motor laterality assessment so that comparisons can be made between the populations sampled. By adopting such an approach, researchers should mutually benefit as motor laterality data could then be compared and subjected to meta-analysis.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1558-7878 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ S1558-7878(10)00038-9 Serial 5378
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Author Tomkins, L.M.; Williams, K.A.; Thomson, P.C.; McGreevy, P.D.
Title Sensory Jump Test as a measure of sensory (visual) lateralization in dogs (Canis familiaris) Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Veterinary Behavior Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 256-267
Keywords sensory lateralization; monocular vision; binocular vision; jump kinematics; dog
Abstract Sensory lateralization in dogs (n = 74) was investigated in this study using our innovation, the Sensory Jump Test. This required the modification of head halters to create three different ocular treatments (binocular, right, and left monocular vision) for eye preference assessment in a jumping task. Ten jumps were recorded as a jump set for each treatment. Measurements recorded included (i) launch and landing paws, (ii) type of jump, (iii) approach distance, (iv) clearance height of the forepaw, hindpaw, and the lowest part of the body to clear the jump, and (v) whether the jump was successful. Factors significantly associated with these jump outcomes included ocular treatment, jump set number, and replication number. Most notably, in the first jump set, findings indicated a left hemispheric dominance for the initial navigation of the Sensory Jump Test, as left monocular vision (LMV) compromised of jumping more than right monocular (RMV) and binocular vision, with a significantly reduced approach distance and forepaw clearance observed in dogs with LMV. However, by the third jump set, dogs undergoing LMV launched from a greater approach distance and with a higher clearance height, corresponding to an increase in success rate of the jump, in comparison with RMV and binocular vision dogs. A marginally non-significant RMV bias was observed for eye preference based on the laterality indices for approach distance (P = 0.060) and lowest body part clearance height (P = 0.067). A comparison between eye preference and launching or landing paws showed no association between these measures of sensory and motor laterality. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on sensory lateralization in the dog, and furthermore, to compare both motor and sensory laterality in dogs.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1558-7878 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ S1558-7878(10)00019-5 Serial 5379
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Author Krueger, K.
Title “Erfasst” das Pferd die menschliche Psyche" Type Book Chapter
Year 2010 Publication Pferdegestützte Therapie bei psychischen Erkrankungen Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 40-51
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Publisher Schattauer Verlag Place of Publication Stuttgart Editor Dettling, M.; Opgen-Rhein, C.; Kläschen, M.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3794527557 Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5443
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Author Clutton-Brock, T.H.; Harvey, P.H.
Title Primates, brains and ecology Type Journal Article
Year 1980 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Zool. Lond.
Volume 190 Issue 3 Pages 309-323
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Abstract The paper examines systematic relationships among primates between brain size (relative to body size) and differences in ecology and social system. Marked differences in relative brain size exist between families. These are correlated with inter-family differences in body size and home range size. Variation in comparative brain size within families is related to diet (folivores have comparatively smaller brains than frugivores), home range size and possibly also to breeding system. The adaptive significance of these relationships is discussed.
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Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1469-7998 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5451
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Author Benz, B.; Benitz, B.; Krueger, K.; Winter, D.
Title Weniger Einstreu bei gleichem Komfort Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Pferdezucht und Haltung Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages 66-71
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Publisher AVA-Verlag-Allgäu GmbH Place of Publication Kempten Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5654
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