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Author (up) Albiach-Serrano, A.; Bräuer, J.; Cacchione, T.; Zickert, N.; Amici, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of domestication and ontogeny in swine cognition (Sus scrofa scrofa and S. s. domestica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 141 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Albiach-Serrano2012 Serial 6329  
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Author (up) Aldezabal, A.; Garin, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Browsing preference of feral goats (Capra hircus L.) in a Mediterranean mountain scrubland Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication J Arid Env Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 44 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Aldezabal2000 Serial 6256  
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Author (up) Amodio, P.; Boeckle, M.; Schnell, A.K.; Ostojic, L.; Fiorito, G.; Clayton, N.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Grow Smart and Die Young: Why Did Cephalopods Evolve Intelligence? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends. Ecol. Evol.  
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  Abstract Intelligence in large-brained vertebrates might have evolved through independent, yet similar processes based on comparable socioecological pressures and slow life histories. This convergent evolutionary route, however, cannot explain why cephalopods developed large brains and flexible behavioural repertoires: cephalopods have fast life histories and live in simple social environments. Here, we suggest that the loss of the external shell in cephalopods (i) caused a dramatic increase in predatory pressure, which in turn prevented the emergence of slow life histories, and (ii) allowed the exploitation of novel challenging niches, thus favouring the emergence of intelligence. By highlighting convergent and divergent aspects between cephalopods and large-brained vertebrates we illustrate how the evolution of intelligence might not be constrained to a single evolutionary route.  
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  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
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  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2018.10.010 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6508  
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Author (up) Apollonio, M.; Mattioli, L.; Scandura, M.; Mauri, L.; Gazzola, A.; Avanzinelli, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wolves in the Casentinesi Forests: insights for wolf conservation in Italy from a protected area with a rich wild prey community Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Biol Conserv Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 120 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Apollonio2004 Serial 6475  
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Author (up) Bachmann, I.; Audige, L.; Stauffacher, M. doi  openurl
  Title Risk factors associated with behavioural disorders of crib-biting, weaving and box-walking in Swiss horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet J  
  Volume 35 Issue 2 Pages 158-163  
  Keywords Animal Husbandry/*methods; Animals; *Behavior, Animal; Confounding Factors (Epidemiology); Data Collection; Female; Horse Diseases/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Horses; *Housing, Animal; Male; Mental Disorders/epidemiology/etiology/prevention & control/*veterinary; Prevalence; Regression Analysis; Risk Factors; *Stereotyped Behavior; Switzerland/epidemiology  
  Abstract REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Studies on the prevalence of behavioural disorders in horses and on associated risk factors have revealed inconsistent results. There are many studies on the neuropharmacological, surgical or mechanical therapy of stereotypies, but little is known about their causation. OBJECTIVES: To explore risk factors associated with the occurrence of behavioural disorders in horses. METHODS: A sample of horse owners, selected randomly and representative for Switzerland, was contacted in a postal survey. Answers were provided for 622 stables (response rate 35.2%). Individual data of 2,341 horses were examined with path analysis (multivariable linear and logistic regression), and adjustment made for possible confounding effects due to age and breed. RESULTS: Out of 60 possible risk factors, 11 were associated with the outcome at the univariable level (null-hypothesis path model) and 3 factors remained after the backward logistic regression procedure. Mature Warmbloods and Thoroughbreds, assessed by the owners to be reactive, fed 4 times a day and without daily pasture, had increased odds of displaying crib-biting, weaving and box-walking. Furthermore, indirect associations of 5 factors with the outcome were identified. CONCLUSIONS: The final logistic regression model of risk factors leads to the hypotheses that causal prevention of stereotypic behaviours should be based upon housing and management conditions which allow tactile contact with other horses (e.g. mutual grooming), daily free movement (paddock or pasture), as well as the provision of high amounts of roughage but of little or no concentrates. POTENTIAL CLINICAL RELEVANCE: It is one of the aims of population medicine to prevent the development of behavioural disorders. Further research is needed to test the concluding hypotheses in experimental studies or to verify them in the context of similar observational studies.  
  Address Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), LFW B55. 1, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:12638792 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1907  
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Author (up) Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G.; Briefer, E.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Goats favour personal over social information in an experimental foraging task Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Peer J Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue Pages  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Baciadonna2013 Serial 6269  
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Author (up) Baker, P.J.; Funk, S.M.; Harris, S.; White, P.C.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Flexible spatial organization of urban foxes, Vulpes vulpes, before and during an outbreak of sarcoptic mange Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.  
  Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 127-146  
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  Abstract The social and spatial organization of urban fox groups prior to and during an outbreak of sarcoptic mange was compared with predictions derived from the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH). We investigated the availability of three key resources. Neither daytime rest sites nor breeding sites appeared to be limited in availability. The availability of food deliberately supplied by local householders was examined by questionnaire surveys. The daily and weekly amount of food supplied was greatly in excess of the minimum requirements of a pair of foxes, but was consistent between territories. The availability of this food source increased markedly as a result of more people feeding the foxes. In agreement with the RDH, group size prior to the outbreak of mange increased from 2.25 animals (N=4) to 6.57 animals (N=7). Before the outbreak of mange, two territories were divided. Increased scavenge availability on smaller territories may have promoted these changes. Excluding these spatial changes, territories were very stable between years. After the outbreak of mange, group size declined as a direct result of mange-induced mortality. Surviving animals increased their ranges only after neighbouring groups had died out. Ranges did not increase in size in response to a decline in food availability. Nor were the increases in range size associated with the relinquishment of parts of the existing territory. These postmange changes are contrary to the RDH. Three factors may have promoted these changes: the elimination of interstitial space, the forced dispersal of young or future division of the territory.  
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  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6431  
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Author (up) Bartal, I.B.-A.; Decety, J.; Mason, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Empathy and Pro-Social Behavior in Rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1427-1430  
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  Abstract Whereas human pro-social behavior is often driven by empathic concern for another, it is unclear whether nonprimate mammals experience a similar motivational state. To test for empathically motivated pro-social behavior in rodents, we placed a free rat in an arena with a cagemate trapped in a restrainer. After several sessions, the free rat learned to intentionally and quickly open the restrainer and free the cagemate. Rats did not open empty or object-containing restrainers. They freed cagemates even when social contact was prevented. When liberating a cagemate was pitted against chocolate contained within a second restrainer, rats opened both restrainers and typically shared the chocolate. Thus, rats behave pro-socially in response to a conspecific�s distress, providing strong evidence for biological roots of empathically motivated helping behavior.  
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  Notes 10.1126/science.1210789 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5725  
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Author (up) Bates, D. openurl 
  Title Fitting linear mixed models in R Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication R News Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Bates2005 Serial 6293  
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Author (up) Bates, L.A.; Byrne, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Creative or created: Using anecdotes to investigate animal cognition Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Methods Abbreviated Journal Methods  
  Volume 42 Issue 1 Pages 12-21  
  Keywords Anecdote; Creativity; Intelligence; Deception; Innovation; African elephant  
  Abstract In non-human animals, creative behaviour occurs spontaneously only at low frequencies, so is typically missed by standardised observational methods. Experimental approaches have tended to rely overly on paradigms from child development or adult human cognition, which may be inappropriate for species that inhabit very different perceptual worlds and possess quite different motor capacities than humans. The analysis of anecdotes offers a solution to this impasse, provided certain conditions are met. To be reliable, anecdotes must be recorded immediately after observation, and only the records of scientists experienced with the species and the individuals concerned should be used. Even then, interpretation of a single record is always ambiguous, and analysis is feasible only when collation of multiple records shows that a behaviour pattern occurs repeatedly under similar circumstances. This approach has been used successfully to study a number of creative capacities of animals: the distribution, nature and neural correlates of deception across the primate order; the occurrence of teaching in animals; and the neural correlates of several aptitudes--in birds, foraging innovation, and in primates, innovation, social learning and tool-use. Drawing on these approaches, we describe the use of this method to investigate a new problem, the cognition of the African elephant, a species whose sheer size and evolutionary distance from humans renders the conventional methods of comparative psychology of little use. The aim is both to chart the creative cognitive capacities of this species, and to devise appropriate experimental methods to confirm and extend previous findings.  
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  ISSN 1046-2023 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes also special issue: Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Creativity: A Toolkit Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6185  
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