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Author (up) Benson-Amram, S.; Holekamp, K.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Innovative problem solving by wild spotted hyenas Type
  Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 279 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Benson-Amram2012 Serial 6266  
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Author (up) Benz, B.; Benitz, B.; Krueger, K.; Winter, D. openurl 
  Title Weniger Einstreu bei gleichem Komfort Type
  Year 2013 Publication Pferdezucht und Haltung Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue Pages 66-71  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher AVA-Verlag-Allgäu GmbH Place of Publication Kempten Editor  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5654  
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Author (up) Blakeman, N.E.; Friend, T.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Visual discrimination at varying distances in Spanish goats Type
  Year 1986 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Blakeman1986 Serial 6251  
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Author (up) Blatz, S.; Krüger,K.; Zanger, M. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Der Hufmechanismus – was wir wirklich wissen! Eine historische und fachliche Auseinandersetzung mit der Biomechanik des Hufes Type
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Huf Hufmechanismus Pferd  
  Abstract Der Hufmechanismus – wir alle glauben ihn zu kennen und zu wissen wie er funktioniert. Doch wussten Sie, dass nach über 250 Jahren der Forschung immer noch keine eindeutige Aussage dazu getroffen werden kann, wie der Hufmechanismus genau entsteht, vonstattengeht und wie er bei der Hufbearbeitung berücksichtigt werden muss?

Die Ergebnisse von 50 Studien unterstützen die Elastizitätstheorie. Sie beschreibt einen individuellen Hufmechanismus, der von Pferd zu Pferd unterschiedlich und von mannigfaltigen Faktoren abhängig ist.

Der Hufmechanismus zeigt sich als ebenso anpassungsfähig wie die Hufform selbst. Daher sollte bei der Hufbearbeitung und beim Beschlag mit Maß und Weitblick die optimale und individuelle Lösung für jedes Pferd gefunden werden.
 
  Address  
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  Publisher Xenophon Verlag e.K. Place of Publication Wald Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3-95625-004-0 Medium  
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  Notes Approved  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6404  
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; Haque, S.; Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Goats excel at learning and remembering a highly novel cognitive task Type
  Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Zoology Abbreviated Journal Front. Zool.  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 20  
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  Abstract The computational demands of sociality (maintaining group cohesion, reducing conflict) and ecological problems (extractive foraging, memorizing resource locations) are the main drivers proposed to explain the evolution cognition. Different predictions follow, about whether animals would preferentially learn new tasks socially or not, but the prevalent view today is that intelligent species should excel at social learning. However, the predictions were originally used to explain primate cognition, and studies of species with relatively smaller brains are rare. By contrast, domestication has often led to a decrease in brain size, which could affect cognition. In domestic animals, the relaxed selection pressures compared to a wild environment could have led to reduced social and physical cognition. Goats possess several features commonly associated with advanced cognition, such as successful colonization of new environments and complex fission-fusion societies. Here, we assessed goat social and physical cognition as well as long-term memory of a complex two-step foraging task (food box cognitive challenge), in order to investigate some of the main selection pressures thought to affect the evolution of ungulate cognition.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1742-9994 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2014 Serial 6376  
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; McElligott, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rescued goats at a sanctuary display positive mood after former neglect Type
  Year 2013 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 146 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2013 Serial 6287  
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; Padilla de la Torre, M.; McElligott, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mother goats do not forget their kids' calls Type
  Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 279 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2012 Serial 6282  
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Author (up) Burla, J.-B.; Siegwart, J.; Nawroth, C. doi  openurl
  Title Human Demonstration Does Not Facilitate the Performance of Horses (Equus caballus) in a Spatial Problem-Solving Task Type
  Year 2018 Publication Animal Abbreviated Journal Animal  
  Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 96  
  Keywords detour task; equids; social cognition; social learning; spatial cognition  
  Abstract Horses’ ability to adapt to new environments and to acquire new information plays an important role in handling and training. Social learning in particular would be very adaptive for horses as it enables them to flexibly adjust to new environments. In the context of horse handling, social learning from humans has been rarely investigated but could help to facilitate management practices. We assessed the impact of human demonstration on the spatial problem-solving abilities of horses during a detour task. In this task, a bucket with a food reward was placed behind a double-detour barrier and 16 horses were allocated to two test groups of 8 horses each. One group received a human demonstration of how to solve the spatial task while the other group received no demonstration. We found that horses did not solve the detour task more often or faster with human demonstration. However, both test groups improved rapidly over trials. Our results suggest that horses prefer to use individual rather than social information when solving a spatial problem-solving task  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6392  
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Author (up) Burn, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Vicious Cycle: A Cross-Sectional Study of Canine Tail-Chasing and Human Responses to It, Using a Free Video-Sharing Website Type
  Year 2011 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One  
  Volume 6 Issue 11 Pages e26553  
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  Abstract Tail-chasing is widely celebrated as normal canine behaviour in cultural references. However, all previous scientific studies of tail-chasing or 'spinning' have comprised small clinical populations of dogs with neurological, compulsive or other pathological conditions; most were ultimately euthanased. Thus, there is great disparity between scientific and public information on tail-chasing. I gathered data on the first large (n = 400), non-clinical tail-chasing population, made possible through a vast, free, online video repository, YouTube[TM]. The demographics of this online population are described and discussed. Approximately one third of tail-chasing dogs showed clinical signs, including habitual (daily or 'all the time') or perseverative (difficult to distract) performance of the behaviour. These signs were observed across diverse breeds. Clinical signs appeared virtually unrecognised by the video owners and commenting viewers; laughter was recorded in 55% of videos, encouragement in 43%, and the commonest viewer descriptors were that the behaviour was 'funny' (46%) or 'cute' (42%). Habitual tail-chasers had 6.5+/-2.3 times the odds of being described as 'Stupid' than other dogs, and perseverative dogs were 6.8+/-2.1 times more frequently described as 'Funny' than distractible ones were. Compared with breed- and age-matched control videos, tail-chasing videos were significantly more often indoors and with a computer/television screen switched on. These findings highlight that tail-chasing is sometimes pathological, but can remain untreated, or even be encouraged, because of an assumption that it is 'normal' dog behaviour. The enormous viewing figures that YouTube[TM] attracts (mean+/-s.e. = 863+/-197 viewings per tail-chasing video) suggest that this perception will be further reinforced, without effective intervention.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6378  
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Author (up) Byrne, R.W. doi  openurl
  Title Do larger brains mean greater intelligence? Type
  Year 1993 Publication Behavioral and Brain Sciences Abbreviated Journal Behav. Brain Sci.  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 696-697  
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  Publisher Cambridge University Press Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1469-1825 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6171  
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