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Author (up) Boersma, P.; Weenink, D.
Title Praat: doing phonetics by computer Type Book Whole
Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Boersma2009 Serial 6496
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Author (up) Boitani, L.
Title Patterns of homesites attendance in two Minnesota wolf packs Type Book Chapter
Year 1982 Publication Wolves of the World: Perspectives of Behavior, Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal
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Publisher Noyes, Park Ridge Place of Publication New York Editor Harrington, F.H.; Paquet, P.C.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Boitani1982 Serial 6474
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Author (up) Bond III, E.U.; Walker, B.A.; Hutt, M.D.; Reingen, P.H.
Title Reputational Effectiveness in Cross-Functional Working Relationships Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Journal of Product Innovation Management Abbreviated Journal ‎J. Prod. Innov. Manag.
Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 44-60
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Abstract The work of innovation management involves cross-functional coordination among specialists and managers with different work orientations, time horizons, professional backgrounds, and values (Ford and Randolph, 1992). While strong connections across functions are critical for new product development success (Green et al., 2000), some managers may be more adept at fostering effective cross-functional relationships than others. In this article, the authors empirically examine the factors that distinguish reputationally effective innovation workers from their less effective peers. Drawing on the work of Tsui (1984, 1994), reputational effectiveness is defined as the degree to which a manager has been responsive to the needs and expectations of constituents. This research examines the relational skills and interaction patterns of more (versus less) reputationally effective managers. A large business unit of a Fortune 500 telecommunications firm provided the context for our study. Using a two-phase approach, the authors first captured the social network patterns of 268 managers from marketing, research and development (R&D), manufacturing, and other business functions that were involved in the new product development process. In addition, the reputational effectiveness of each person who was identified as a member of the network was measured. In the second phase, the authors examined the relational competencies (e.g., role-taking ability, interpersonal control, openness) of the managers who participated in Phase I of the research. As predicted, the results indicate that role-taking ability is related positively to a manager's reputational effectiveness. No support, however, was found for the relationship between interpersonal control and reputational effectiveness. Interestingly, the authors found evidence of an inverse relationship between openness and effectiveness. By sharing too much information?or alternatively information that does not relate to the task at hand?the reputational effectiveness of a manager is damaged. Importantly, the results reveal that the social network characteristics of a reputationally effective manager differ from those of less effective managers. Closeness centrality, a measure of the degree of access one has to other organizational members, was associated strongly with reputational effectiveness. The results demonstrate that managers who are successful in working across functions appreciate the cognitive and emotional perspectives of diverse constituents and develop relationship ties that provide them with ready access to others across the organization.
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Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN 0737-6782 ISBN Medium
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Notes doi: 10.1111/j.0737-6782.2004.00053.x Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6540
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Author (up) Bonin, S.J.; Clayton, H.M.; Lanovaz, J.L.; Johnston, T.
Title Comparison of mandibular motion in horses chewing hay and pellets Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet. J.
Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 258-262
Keywords horse; temporomandibular joint; mastication; kinematics
Abstract Summary Reasons for performing study: Previous studies have suggested that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) kinematics depend on the type of food being masticated, but accurate measurements of TMJ motion in horses chewing different feeds have not been published. Hypothesis: The temporomandibular joint has a larger range of motion when horses chew hay compared to pellets. Methods: An optical motion capture system was used to track skin markers on the skull and mandible of 7 horses as they chewed hay and pellets. A virtual marker was created on the midline between the mandibles at the level of the 4th premolar teeth to represent the overall motion of the mandible relative to the skull during the chewing cycle. Results: Frequency of the chewing cycles was lower for hay than for pellets. Excursions of the virtual mandibular marker were significantly larger in all 3 directions when chewing hay compared to pellets. The mean velocity of the virtual mandibular marker during the chewing cycle was the same when chewing the 2 feeds. Conclusions: The range of mediolateral displacement of the mandible was sufficient to give full occlusal contact of the upper and lower dental arcades when chewing hay but not when chewing pellets. Potential relevance: These findings support the suggestion that horses receiving a diet high in concentrate feeds may require more frequent dental prophylactic examinations and treatments to avoid the development of dental irregularities associated with smaller mandibular excursions during chewing.
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Publisher American Medical Association (AMA) Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium
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Notes doi: 10.2746/042516407X157792 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6513
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Author (up) Breitenmoser, U.
Title Large predators in the Alps: the fall and rise of man's competitors Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Biol Conserv Abbreviated Journal
Volume 83 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Breitenmoser1998 Serial 6450
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; Haque, S.; Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G.
Title Goats excel at learning and remembering a highly novel cognitive task Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Zoology Abbreviated Journal Front. Zool.
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 20
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Abstract The computational demands of sociality (maintaining group cohesion, reducing conflict) and ecological problems (extractive foraging, memorizing resource locations) are the main drivers proposed to explain the evolution cognition. Different predictions follow, about whether animals would preferentially learn new tasks socially or not, but the prevalent view today is that intelligent species should excel at social learning. However, the predictions were originally used to explain primate cognition, and studies of species with relatively smaller brains are rare. By contrast, domestication has often led to a decrease in brain size, which could affect cognition. In domestic animals, the relaxed selection pressures compared to a wild environment could have led to reduced social and physical cognition. Goats possess several features commonly associated with advanced cognition, such as successful colonization of new environments and complex fission-fusion societies. Here, we assessed goat social and physical cognition as well as long-term memory of a complex two-step foraging task (food box cognitive challenge), in order to investigate some of the main selection pressures thought to affect the evolution of ungulate cognition.
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ISSN 1742-9994 ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2014 Serial 6376
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; McElligott, A.G.
Title Rescued goats at a sanctuary display positive mood after former neglect Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal
Volume 146 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2013 Serial 6287
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Author (up) Briefer, E.F.; Padilla de la Torre, M.; McElligott, A.G.
Title Mother goats do not forget their kids' calls Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal
Volume 279 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2012 Serial 6282
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Author (up) Broekhuis, F.; Madsen, E.K.; Klaassen, B.
Title Predators and pastoralists: how anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas influence carnivore space use and movement behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords cheetah; livestock; movement; human pressure; protected areas; space use
Abstract Abstract Across the globe, wildlife populations and their behaviours are negatively impacted by people. Protected areas are believed to be an antidote to increasing human pressures but even they are not immune to the impact of anthropogenic activities. Areas that have been set aside for the protection of wildlife therefore warrant more attention when investigating the impact of anthropogenic pressures on wildlife. We use cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus as a case study to explore how a large carnivore responds to anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas. Using GPS-collar data we investigate cheetah space use, both when moving and stationary, and movement parameters (speed and turn angles) in relation to human disturbance, distance to human settlement, livestock abundance and livestock site use inside wildlife areas. Space use was negatively influenced by human disturbance, resulting in habitat loss and fragmentation and potentially reducing landscape permeability between neighbouring wildlife areas. Cheetahs were also less likely to stop in areas where livestock numbers were high, but more likely to stop in areas that were frequently used by livestock. The latter could reflect that cheetahs are attracted to livestock however, cheetahs in the study area rarely predated on livestock. It is therefore more likely that areas that are frequently used by livestock attract wild herbivores, which in turn could influence cheetah space use. We did not find any effects of people and livestock on cheetahs? speed and turn angles which might be related to the resolution of the data. We found that cheetahs are sensitive to human pressures and we believe that they could be an indicator species for other large carnivores facing similar challenges. We suggest that further research is needed to determine the levels of anthropogenic pressures needed to maintain ecological integrity, especially inside wildlife areas.
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Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium
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Notes doi: 10.1111/acv.12483 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6522
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Author (up) Burch, J.W.; Layne, G.A.; Follmann, E.H.; Rexstad, E.A.
Title Evaluation of Wolf Density Estimation from Radiotelemetry Data Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Wildl Soc Bull Abbreviated Journal
Volume 33 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Burch2005 Serial 6477
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