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Author (up)
Title R Foundation for Statistical Computing Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher R Foundation for Statistical Computing Place of Publication Vienna, Austria Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ ref80 Serial 6295
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Author (up) Aberle, K.S.; Hamann, H.; Drögemüller, C.; Distl, O.
Title Genetic diversity in German draught horse breeds compared with a group of primitive, riding and wild horses by means of microsatellite DNA markers Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Animal Genetics Abbreviated Journal Anim. Gen.
Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 270-277
Keywords diversity; endangered breeds; genetic variation; horse; microsatellite
Abstract Summary We compared the genetic diversity and distance among six German draught horse breeds to wild (Przewalski's Horse), primitive (Icelandic Horse, Sorraia Horse, Exmoor Pony) or riding horse breeds (Hanoverian Warmblood, Arabian) by means of genotypic information from 30 microsatellite loci. The draught horse breeds included the South German Coldblood, Rhenish German Draught Horse, Mecklenburg Coldblood, Saxon Thuringa Coldblood, Black Forest Horse and Schleswig Draught Horse. Despite large differences in population sizes, the average observed heterozygosity (Ho) differed little among the heavy horse breeds (0.64�0.71), but was considerably lower than in the Hanoverian Warmblood or Icelandic Horse population. The mean number of alleles (NA) decreased more markedly with declining population sizes of German draught horse breeds (5.2�6.3) but did not reach the values of Hanoverian Warmblood (NA = 6.7). The coefficient of differentiation among the heavy horse breeds showed 11.6% of the diversity between the heavy horse breeds, as opposed to 21.2% between the other horse populations. The differentiation test revealed highly significant genetic differences among all draught horse breeds except the Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldbloods. The Schleswig Draught Horse was the most distinct draught horse breed. In conclusion, the study demonstrated a clear distinction among the German draught horse breeds and even among breeds with a very short history of divergence like Rhenish German Draught Horse and its East German subpopulations Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldblood.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Blackwell Science Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1365-2052 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5184
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Author (up) Adelman, M.; Knijnik, J.
Title Gender and Equestrian Sport Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords British Equestrian Sport Canadian Show Jumping Cojones and Rejones Comparative Analysis Equestrian World through a Gender Lens Equestrianism during the 20th Century Fluid Masculinities on Brazilian Dressage Gender Studies and Equestrian Sport Horseracing and Gender in the United Kingdom Juvenile Equine Fiction for Girls Men and Horse Riding Spanish Mounted Bullfight Sport and Culture Swedish Equestrian Sports Women Riding Rodeo in Southern Brazil Women in Equestrian Polo
Abstract This volume brings together studies from various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities (Anthropology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, History and Literary theory) that examine the equestrian world as a historically gendered and highly dynamic field of contemporary sport and culture. From elite international dressage and jumping, polo and the turf, to the rodeo world of the Americas and popular forms of equestrian sport and culture, we are introduced to a range of issues as they unfold at local and global, national and international levels. Students and scholars of gender, culture and sport will find much of interest in this original look at contemporary issues such as “engendered” (women’s and men’s) dentities/subjectivities of equestrians, representations of girls, horses and the world of adventure in juvenile fiction; the current “feminization” of particular equestrian activities (and where boys and men stand in relation to this); how broad forms of social inequality and stratification play themselves out within gendered equestrian contexts; men and women and their relation to horses within the framework of current discussions on the relation of animals to humans (which may include not only love and care, but also exploitation and violence), among others. Singular contributions that incorporate a wide variety of classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical methodologies show how horse cultures around the globe contribute to historical and current constructions of embodied “femininities” and “masculinities”, reflecting a world that has been moving “beyond the binaries” while continuing to be enmeshed in their persistent and contradictory legacy. The final chapter makes a brave attempt at synthesizing individual chapters and moving forward from the evidences they provide, to suggest a compelling agenda for future research.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Dordrecht Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-94-007-6823-9 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6389
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Author (up) Albiach-Serrano, A.; Bräuer, J.; Cacchione, T.; Zickert, N.; Amici, F.
Title The effect of domestication and ontogeny in swine cognition (Sus scrofa scrofa and S. s. domestica) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal
Volume 141 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Albiach-Serrano2012 Serial 6329
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Author (up) Aldezabal, A.; Garin, I.
Title Browsing preference of feral goats (Capra hircus L.) in a Mediterranean mountain scrubland Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication J Arid Env Abbreviated Journal
Volume 44 Issue Pages
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Aldezabal2000 Serial 6256
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Author (up) Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G.; Briefer, E.F.
Title Goats favour personal over social information in an experimental foraging task Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Peer J Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Baciadonna2013 Serial 6269
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Author (up) Bartal, I.B.-A.; Decety, J.; Mason, P.
Title Empathy and Pro-Social Behavior in Rats Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1427-1430
Keywords
Abstract Whereas human pro-social behavior is often driven by empathic concern for another, it is unclear whether nonprimate mammals experience a similar motivational state. To test for empathically motivated pro-social behavior in rodents, we placed a free rat in an arena with a cagemate trapped in a restrainer. After several sessions, the free rat learned to intentionally and quickly open the restrainer and free the cagemate. Rats did not open empty or object-containing restrainers. They freed cagemates even when social contact was prevented. When liberating a cagemate was pitted against chocolate contained within a second restrainer, rats opened both restrainers and typically shared the chocolate. Thus, rats behave pro-socially in response to a conspecific�s distress, providing strong evidence for biological roots of empathically motivated helping behavior.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes 10.1126/science.1210789 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5725
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Author (up) Bates, D.
Title Fitting linear mixed models in R Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication R News Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue Pages
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Bates2005 Serial 6293
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Author (up) Bates, L.A.; Byrne, R.W.
Title Creative or created: Using anecdotes to investigate animal cognition Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Methods Abbreviated Journal Methods
Volume 42 Issue 1 Pages 12-21
Keywords Anecdote; Creativity; Intelligence; Deception; Innovation; African elephant
Abstract In non-human animals, creative behaviour occurs spontaneously only at low frequencies, so is typically missed by standardised observational methods. Experimental approaches have tended to rely overly on paradigms from child development or adult human cognition, which may be inappropriate for species that inhabit very different perceptual worlds and possess quite different motor capacities than humans. The analysis of anecdotes offers a solution to this impasse, provided certain conditions are met. To be reliable, anecdotes must be recorded immediately after observation, and only the records of scientists experienced with the species and the individuals concerned should be used. Even then, interpretation of a single record is always ambiguous, and analysis is feasible only when collation of multiple records shows that a behaviour pattern occurs repeatedly under similar circumstances. This approach has been used successfully to study a number of creative capacities of animals: the distribution, nature and neural correlates of deception across the primate order; the occurrence of teaching in animals; and the neural correlates of several aptitudes--in birds, foraging innovation, and in primates, innovation, social learning and tool-use. Drawing on these approaches, we describe the use of this method to investigate a new problem, the cognition of the African elephant, a species whose sheer size and evolutionary distance from humans renders the conventional methods of comparative psychology of little use. The aim is both to chart the creative cognitive capacities of this species, and to devise appropriate experimental methods to confirm and extend previous findings.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1046-2023 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes also special issue: Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Creativity: A Toolkit Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6185
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Author (up) Beery, A.K.; Kaufer, D.
Title Stress, social behavior, and resilience: Insights from rodents Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Neurobiology of Stress Abbreviated Journal Neurobiol. Stress
Volume 1 Issue Stress Resilience Pages 116-127
Keywords Stress; Anxiety; Social behavior; Sociality; Social stress; Social buffering
Abstract The neurobiology of stress and the neurobiology of social behavior are deeply intertwined. The social environment interacts with stress on almost every front: social interactions can be potent stressors; they can buffer the response to an external stressor; and social behavior often changes in response to stressful life experience. This review explores mechanistic and behavioral links between stress, anxiety, resilience, and social behavior in rodents, with particular attention to different social contexts. We consider variation between several different rodent species and make connections to research on humans and non-human primates.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-2895 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6413
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