toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Krueger, K. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title (up) “Erfasst” das Pferd die menschliche Psyche" Type Book Chapter
  Year 2010 Publication Pferdegestützte Therapie bei psychischen Erkrankungen Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 40-51  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Schattauer Verlag Place of Publication Stuttgart Editor Dettling, M.; Opgen-Rhein, C.; Kläschen, M.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3794527557 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krueger, K. isbn  openurl
  Title (up) “Pferdehaltung und Ethologie der Pferde” im Bachelorstudiengang Pferdewirtschaft Type Book Chapter
  Year 2014 Publication Forschendes Lernen initiieren, umsetzen und reflektieren Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 54-81  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher UniversitätsVerlag Webler Place of Publication Bielefeld Editor : S. Lepp und C. Niederdrenk-Felgner  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 10: 3-937026-91-6 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5944  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author openurl 
  Title (up) 4Free Video Converter. 4 Free Studio. Copyright© 2000~2015 4Free Video Converter Inc. a Multimedia Utility Company Type Miscellaneous
  Year Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ ref53 Serial 6494  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kwang Ng Aik; Rodrigues Daphne url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication The Journal of Creative Behavior Abbreviated Journal J. Creativ. Behav.  
  Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 254-268  
  Keywords  
  Abstract This study explored the relationship between two creative styles (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience). 164 teachers from 3 secondary and 2 primary schools in Singapore completed a self?report questionnaire, which consisted of the Kirton Adaption?Innovation Inventory and the NEO?Five Factor Inventory. It was found that adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more extraverted and open to experience than adaptors. No significant differences were found between adaptors and innovators in neuroticism and agreeableness. The study also revealed a meaningful pattern of relationships between the Big Five personality traits and the three facet scales of the KAI. Specifically, Sufficiency of Originality was negatively correlated with Openness to Experience and Extraversion; Rule Governance was positively correlated with conscientiousness but negatively correlated with openness to experience; Efficiency was positively correlated with conscientiousness. The overall findings supported the fundamental contention that different creative styles were due to different combinations of personality traits, with adaptors being more conscientious, while innovators being more extraverted and open to experience. These personality?based differences in creative styles between adaptors and innovators had resulted in much social conflict between them. One way of resolving it is to make known the nature and value of different creative styles to these two different types of creators.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1002/j.2162-6057.2002.tb01068.x Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6384  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Devinsky, O.; Boesch, J.M.; Cerda-Gonzalez, S.; Coffey, B.; Davis, K.; Friedman, D.; Hainline, B.; Houpt, K.; Lieberman, D.; Perry, P.; Prüss, H.; Samuels, M.A.; Small, G.W.; Volk, H.; Summerfield, A.; Vite, C.; Wisniewski, T.; Natterson-Horowitz, B. doi  openurl
  Title (up) A cross-species approach to disorders affecting brain and behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Reviews Neurology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Structural and functional elements of biological systems are highly conserved across vertebrates. Many neurological and psychiatric conditions affect both humans and animals. A cross-species approach to the study of brain and behaviour can advance our understanding of human disorders via the identification of unrecognized natural models of spontaneous disorders, thus revealing novel factors that increase vulnerability or resilience, and via the assessment of potential therapies. Moreover, diagnostic and therapeutic advances in human neurology and psychiatry can often be adapted for veterinary patients. However, clinical and research collaborations between physicians and veterinarians remain limited, leaving this wealth of comparative information largely untapped. Here, we review pain, cognitive decline syndromes, epilepsy, anxiety and compulsions, autoimmune and infectious encephalitides and mismatch disorders across a range of animal species, looking for novel insights with translational potential. This comparative perspective can help generate novel hypotheses, expand and improve clinical trials and identify natural animal models of disease resistance and vulnerability.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1759-4766 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Devinsky2018 Serial 6420  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nakagawa, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A farewell to Bonferroni: the problems of low statistical power and publication bias Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Behav Ecol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Nakagawa2004 Serial 6294  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meriggi,A.; Lovari, S. openurl 
  Title (up) A Review of Wolf Predation in Southern Europe: Does the Wolf Prefer Wild Prey to Livestock? Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Journal of Applled Ecology Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Ecol  
  Volume 33 Issue Pages 1561-1571  
  Keywords Canis lupus, conservation, food habits, prey abundance, prey availability.  
  Abstract 1. The recent recovery of the wolf in southern Europe has not yet removed the risk

of local extinction. Wolf populations are fragmented and often comprise fewer than

500 individuals. In North America, northern and eastern Europe, wolves feed maiiily

on wild herbivores. In southern Europe, this canid has apparently adapted to feed

also on fruit, rubbish, livestock, small and medium-size mammals.

2. The main conservation problem lies with predation o n domestic ~ingulates,w liich

leads to extensive killing of wolves. The reintroduction of wild large herbivores has

been advocated as a means of reducing attacks on livestock, but predatiori on the

latter may remain high if domestic ungulates are locally abundant.

3. Our synthesis of 15 studies, published in the last 15 years, on food habits of the

wolf in southern Europe, has shown that ungulates have been the main diet component

overall. A significant inverse correlation was found between the occurrence (%) of

wild and domestic ungulates in the diet. The presence of relatively few wild ungulate

species was necessary to reduce predation on livestock.

4. Selection of wild and domestic ungulate prey was influenced mainly by their local

abundance, but also by their accessibility. Feeding dependence on rubbish was local

and rare. In Italy, the consumption of riibbish/fruit and that of ungulates was significantly

negatively correlated. Diet breadth increased as the presence of large prey

in tlie diet decreased.

5. The simultaneous reintroduction of severa1 wild ungulate species is likely to reduce

predation on livestock and may prove to be one of the most effective conservation

measures.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Burn, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A Vicious Cycle: A Cross-Sectional Study of Canine Tail-Chasing and Human Responses to It, Using a Free Video-Sharing Website Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Plos One Abbreviated Journal Plos One  
  Volume 6 Issue 11 Pages e26553  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Tail-chasing is widely celebrated as normal canine behaviour in cultural references. However, all previous scientific studies of tail-chasing or 'spinning' have comprised small clinical populations of dogs with neurological, compulsive or other pathological conditions; most were ultimately euthanased. Thus, there is great disparity between scientific and public information on tail-chasing. I gathered data on the first large (n = 400), non-clinical tail-chasing population, made possible through a vast, free, online video repository, YouTube[TM]. The demographics of this online population are described and discussed. Approximately one third of tail-chasing dogs showed clinical signs, including habitual (daily or 'all the time') or perseverative (difficult to distract) performance of the behaviour. These signs were observed across diverse breeds. Clinical signs appeared virtually unrecognised by the video owners and commenting viewers; laughter was recorded in 55% of videos, encouragement in 43%, and the commonest viewer descriptors were that the behaviour was 'funny' (46%) or 'cute' (42%). Habitual tail-chasers had 6.5+/-2.3 times the odds of being described as 'Stupid' than other dogs, and perseverative dogs were 6.8+/-2.1 times more frequently described as 'Funny' than distractible ones were. Compared with breed- and age-matched control videos, tail-chasing videos were significantly more often indoors and with a computer/television screen switched on. These findings highlight that tail-chasing is sometimes pathological, but can remain untreated, or even be encouraged, because of an assumption that it is 'normal' dog behaviour. The enormous viewing figures that YouTube[TM] attracts (mean+/-s.e. = 863+/-197 viewings per tail-chasing video) suggest that this perception will be further reinforced, without effective intervention.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Public Library of Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6378  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zlatanova, D.; Ahmed, A.; Valasseva, A.; Genov, P. openurl 
  Title (up) Adaptive Diet Strategy of the Wolf (Canis lupus L.) in Europe: a Review Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication ACTA ZOOLOGICA BULGARICA Abbreviated Journal Acta zool. bulg.  
  Volume 66 Issue 4 Pages 439-452  
  Keywords Wolf, Canis lupus, prey, adaptive strategy  
  Abstract The diet strategy of the wolf in Europe is reviewed on the basis of 74 basic and 14 additional literature

sources. The comparative analysis reveals clear dependence on the latitude (and, therefore, on the changing

environmental conditions) correlated with the wild ungulate abundance and diversity. Following a

geographic pattern, the wolf is specialised on different species of ungulates: moose and reindeer in Scandinavia,

red deer in Central and Eastern Europe and wild boar in Southern Europe. Where this large prey

is taken, the roe deer is hunted with almost the same frequency in every region. The wolf diet in Europe

shows two ecological adaptations formed by a complex of variables: 1. Wolves living in natural habitats

with abundance of wild ungulates feed mainly on wild prey. 2. In highly anthropogenic habitats, with low

abundance of wild prey, wolves feed on livestock (where husbandry of domestic animals is available) and

take also a lot of plant food, smaller prey (hares and rodents) and garbage food. The frequency of occurrence

of wild ungulates in the diet of wolves in North Europe varies from 54.0% in Belarus to 132.7% in

Poland, while that of livestock is in the range from 0.4% in Norway to 74.9% in Belarus. In South Europe,

the frequency of occurrence of wild prey varies from 0% in Italy and Spain to 136.0% in Italy, while of domestic

ungulates ranges between 0% and 100% in Spain. The low density or lack of wild prey triggers the

switch of the wolf diet to livestock, plant food (32.2-85% in Italy) or even garbage (up to 41.5% in Italy).
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6388  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Harrington, F.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Aggressive howling in wolves Type Journal Article
  Year 1987 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Harrington1987 Serial 6457  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print