|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Belock, B.; Kaiser, L.J.; Lavagnino, M.; Clayton, H.M.
Title Comparison of pressure distribution under a conventional saddle and a treeless saddle at sitting trot Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 193 Issue 1 Pages 87-91
Keywords Horse; Rider; Equitation; Tack; Electronic pressure mat
Abstract It can be a challenge to find a conventional saddle that is a good fit for both horse and rider. An increasing number of riders are purchasing treeless saddles because they are thought to fit a wider range of equine back shapes, but there is only limited research to support this theory. The objective of this study was to compare the total force and pressure distribution patterns on the horse’s back with conventional and treeless saddles. The experimental hypotheses were that the conventional saddle would distribute the force over a larger area with lower mean and maximal pressures than the treeless saddle. Eight horses were ridden by a single rider at sitting trot with conventional and treeless saddles. An electronic pressure mat measured total force, area of saddle contact, maximal pressure and area with mean pressure >11 kPa for 10 strides with each saddle. Univariate ANOVA (P < 0.05) was used to detect differences between saddles. Compared with the treeless saddle, the conventional saddle distributed the rider’s bodyweight over a larger area, had lower mean and maximal pressures and fewer sensors recording mean pressure >11 kPa. These findings suggested that the saddle tree was effective in distributing the weight of the saddle and rider over a larger area and in avoiding localized areas of force concentration.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5821
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Graf, P.; König von Borstel, U.; Gauly, M.
Title Importance of personality traits in horses to breeders and riders Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 316-325
Keywords survey; personality; temperament; horse; rider; breeder
Abstract Abstract Especially in horses, personality traits play an important role because horses' behavior influences their quality as a riding partner. In contrast to that, no objective assessment of horses' personality traits is available at present. Although initial efforts are made in this field, a successful implementation of behavior tests into horse performance tests depends on the acceptance of the riders and breeders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the importance of personality traits to breeders and riders as well as the degree of riders' acceptance of a temperament test as a more objective means of assessing equine personality traits. Using a web-based survey consisting of a 41-item questionnaire, a total of 1087 competition riders (49.3%), breeders (39.0%), leisure riders (37.9%), and professional riders (8.6%) of 13 countries were recruited to participate in the survey. When asked to split 1000 Euro among the different traits listed in the breeding goal, respondents clearly assigned more weight to the personality-related character and temperament traits (least squares mean ± standard error; P < 0.005: €228.7 ± 17.6) and willingness to work (€123.0 ± 9.6) compared with performance traits, such as the quality of trot (€77.7 ± 6.9) or show jumping (€68.0 ± 12.3). Nevertheless, expected differences in relative weighting of traits between the different groups of riders were confirmed (e.g., character and temperament: €209.3 ± 6.1 [leisure riders] vs. €149.7 ± 5.4 [competition riders], P < 0.0001). When asking why personality traits are so important, the simplification of daily work with the horses (47.9%) and relationship between horse and human (44.9%) as well as a more comfortable and safer handling (31.5%) were most commonly listed. As much as 45.6% of all participants see quality problems with the current assessment and suggested the evaluation of all breeding animals (30.1%), followed by a better standardization of assessment procedures (25.5%) and a move to more objective criteria such as the introduction of a temperament test (20.3%) for solving the problems. The present survey revealed that behavior traits are very important to all groups of riders and breeders, although there are diverse opinions about it. According to the participants, there is a need for and a high potential in the move toward more objective assessment methods of horses' personality traits, and participants would support a restructuring of the current assessment.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1558-7878 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5865
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Huebener, E.
Title How the Horse-Appropriate “Self-Acting” Leg Aid Could Be Better Communicated. Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Tierärztliche Umschau Abbreviated Journal Tierärztl. Umschau
Volume 8 Issue Pages 403
Keywords cultured riding – horse-rider-harmony – sensitive-invisible aids – saving the backs of both horse and rider
Abstract From the base to the top of the sport horses are being coerced into “obedience” or the performance of exercises by force. Campaigns against the “Rollkur” or “Hyperflexion” fill the media. However the root of evil lies a lot deeper. The base of cultured riding in high harmony between horse and rider are sensitive, almost invisible aids which are being timed by the movements of the horse's back and trunk. Anchoring the knowledge of this interrelation in rider's minds has to this day been unsuccessful.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved yes
Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 432
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Huebener, E.
Title The Rider's Impacts and Their Timers – Example: Rider's Aids for Transitions Between Different Gaits. Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Tierärztliche Umschau Abbreviated Journal Tierärztl. Umschau
Volume 10 Issue Pages 515-532
Keywords Animal-friendly rider-horse communication – signals for changing the footfall – knee-jerk impacts in the single “fitting” moment – singular timer for those – immediate “obedience”
Abstract The scientific investigation of the basics of the inherited riding teachings assists in conserving its values. Riding instructors should be able to teach not only “how” but also “why”.

The classic European riding teachings that have developed across the centuries are based on perceptions that have their roots in natural phenomena. They are being mirrored, for instance, in the aids to stimulate the change from one gait to the next.

The movements of the horse's trunk and back provide timers for horse-friendly, sensitive aids that create attentive, diligent and happily cooperating horses.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved yes
Call Number refbase @ user @ Serial 434
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Munsters, C.C.B.M.; Visser, K.E.K.; van den Broek, J.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.
Title The influence of challenging objects and horse-rider matching on heart rate, heart rate variability and behavioural score in riding horses Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 192 Issue 1 Pages 75-80
Keywords Horse-rider interaction; Horse compliance; Welfare; Heart rate; Behaviour score
Abstract A good horse-rider ‘match’ is important in the context of equine welfare. To quantify the influence of repetition and horse-rider matching on the stress of horses encountering challenging objects, 16 Warmblood horses were ridden in a test-setting on three occasions. On each occasion the horse was ridden by a different rider and was challenged by three objects (A–C). Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV) of horse and rider, and behaviour score (BS) of the horse were obtained for each object and as a total for each test. The horse-rider interaction was evaluated with each combination and assessed as ‘matching’ or ‘mismatching’, and the horses were categorised as ‘compliant’, ‘partly-compliant’ or ‘non-compliant’. Horses exhibited a decreased HR (P = 0.015) and a decreased BS (P = 0.004) within and across different tests. ‘Matching’ horse-rider combinations exhibited less stress as indicated by reduced HR (‘match’ 69 ± 10 vs. ‘mismatch’ 72 ± 9, P = 0.001) and BS (‘match’ 1.9 ± 1.1 vs. ‘mismatch’ 3.8 ± 1.4, P = 0.017) of the horse. ‘Compliant’ (68 ± 8, P < 0.001) and ‘partly-compliant’ (71 ± 9, P = 0.002) horses had significantly lower HR than ‘non-compliant’ (75 ± 9) animals. The findings of the study indicate that HR and BS measurements support a subjective ‘match’ diagnosis and HR measurement may be a valuable tool in assessing horse compliance.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5636
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author von Peinen, K.; Wiestner, T.; Bogisch, S.; Roepstorff, L.; Van Weeren, P.R.; Weishaupt, M.A.
Title Relationship between the forces acting on the horse's back and the movements of rider and horse while walking on a treadmill Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 285-291
Keywords horse; ground reaction forces; kinematics; rider; saddle force
Abstract Reasons for performing study: The exact relationship between the saddle pressure pattern during one stride cycle and the movements of horse and rider at the walk are poorly understood and have never been investigated in detail. Hypothesis: The movements of rider and horse account for the force distribution pattern under the saddle. Method: Vertical ground reaction forces (GRF), kinematics of horse and rider as well as saddle forces (FS) were measured synchronously in 7 high level dressage horses while being ridden on an instrumented treadmill at walk. Discrete values of the total saddle forces (FStot) were determined for each stride and related to kinematics and GRF. The pressure sensitive mat was divided into halves and sixths to assess the force distribution over the horse's back in more detail. Differences were tested using a one sample t test (P<0.05). Results: FStot of all the horses showed 3 peaks (P1-P3) and 3 minima (M1-M3) in each half-cycle, which were systematically related to the footfall sequence of the walk. Looking at the halves of the mat, force curves were 50% phase-shifted. The analysis of the FS of the 6 sections showed a clear association to the rider's and horse's movements. Conclusion: The saddle force distribution during an entire stride cycle has a distinct pattern although the force fluctuations of the FStot are small. The forces in the front thirds were clearly related to the movement of the front limbs, those in the mid part to the lateral flexion of the horse's spine and the loading of the hind part was mainly influenced by the axial rotation and lateral bending of the back. Potential relevance: These data can be used as a reference for comparing different types of saddle fit.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2042-3306 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5822
Permanent link to this record