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Author (up) Bateson, P. doi  openurl
  Title Play, playfulness, creativity and innovation. Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Animal Behavior and Cognition Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav. Cogn.  
  Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 99-112  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6553  
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Author (up) Beck, B. B. openurl 
  Title Animal tool behaviour: The use and manufacture of tools by animals Type Book Whole
  Year 1980 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Garland Place of Publication New York Editor  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6524  
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Author (up) Birch, H.G. url  openurl
  Title The relation of previous experience to insightful problem-solving Type Journal Article
  Year 1945 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology Abbreviated Journal J Comp Psychol  
  Volume 38 Issue Pages 367-383  
  Keywords Humans; *Problem Solving; *Psychology, Comparative; *PSYCHOLOGY/comparative  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-9940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21010765 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6554  
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Author (up) Bond III, E.U.; Walker, B.A.; Hutt, M.D.; Reingen, P.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reputational Effectiveness in Cross-Functional Working Relationships Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Product Innovation Management Abbreviated Journal ‎J. Prod. Innov. Manag.  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages 44-60  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The work of innovation management involves cross-functional coordination among specialists and managers with different work orientations, time horizons, professional backgrounds, and values (Ford and Randolph, 1992). While strong connections across functions are critical for new product development success (Green et al., 2000), some managers may be more adept at fostering effective cross-functional relationships than others. In this article, the authors empirically examine the factors that distinguish reputationally effective innovation workers from their less effective peers. Drawing on the work of Tsui (1984, 1994), reputational effectiveness is defined as the degree to which a manager has been responsive to the needs and expectations of constituents. This research examines the relational skills and interaction patterns of more (versus less) reputationally effective managers. A large business unit of a Fortune 500 telecommunications firm provided the context for our study. Using a two-phase approach, the authors first captured the social network patterns of 268 managers from marketing, research and development (R&D), manufacturing, and other business functions that were involved in the new product development process. In addition, the reputational effectiveness of each person who was identified as a member of the network was measured. In the second phase, the authors examined the relational competencies (e.g., role-taking ability, interpersonal control, openness) of the managers who participated in Phase I of the research. As predicted, the results indicate that role-taking ability is related positively to a manager's reputational effectiveness. No support, however, was found for the relationship between interpersonal control and reputational effectiveness. Interestingly, the authors found evidence of an inverse relationship between openness and effectiveness. By sharing too much information?or alternatively information that does not relate to the task at hand?the reputational effectiveness of a manager is damaged. Importantly, the results reveal that the social network characteristics of a reputationally effective manager differ from those of less effective managers. Closeness centrality, a measure of the degree of access one has to other organizational members, was associated strongly with reputational effectiveness. The results demonstrate that managers who are successful in working across functions appreciate the cognitive and emotional perspectives of diverse constituents and develop relationship ties that provide them with ready access to others across the organization.  
  Address  
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  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0737-6782 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/j.0737-6782.2004.00053.x Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6540  
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Author (up) Bonin, S.J.; Clayton, H.M.; Lanovaz, J.L.; Johnston, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of mandibular motion in horses chewing hay and pellets Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Equine Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal Equine Vet. J.  
  Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 258-262  
  Keywords horse; temporomandibular joint; mastication; kinematics  
  Abstract Summary Reasons for performing study: Previous studies have suggested that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) kinematics depend on the type of food being masticated, but accurate measurements of TMJ motion in horses chewing different feeds have not been published. Hypothesis: The temporomandibular joint has a larger range of motion when horses chew hay compared to pellets. Methods: An optical motion capture system was used to track skin markers on the skull and mandible of 7 horses as they chewed hay and pellets. A virtual marker was created on the midline between the mandibles at the level of the 4th premolar teeth to represent the overall motion of the mandible relative to the skull during the chewing cycle. Results: Frequency of the chewing cycles was lower for hay than for pellets. Excursions of the virtual mandibular marker were significantly larger in all 3 directions when chewing hay compared to pellets. The mean velocity of the virtual mandibular marker during the chewing cycle was the same when chewing the 2 feeds. Conclusions: The range of mediolateral displacement of the mandible was sufficient to give full occlusal contact of the upper and lower dental arcades when chewing hay but not when chewing pellets. Potential relevance: These findings support the suggestion that horses receiving a diet high in concentrate feeds may require more frequent dental prophylactic examinations and treatments to avoid the development of dental irregularities associated with smaller mandibular excursions during chewing.  
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  Publisher American Medical Association (AMA) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0425-1644 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.2746/042516407X157792 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6513  
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Author (up) Broekhuis, F.; Madsen, E.K.; Klaassen, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Predators and pastoralists: how anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas influence carnivore space use and movement behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords cheetah; livestock; movement; human pressure; protected areas; space use  
  Abstract Abstract Across the globe, wildlife populations and their behaviours are negatively impacted by people. Protected areas are believed to be an antidote to increasing human pressures but even they are not immune to the impact of anthropogenic activities. Areas that have been set aside for the protection of wildlife therefore warrant more attention when investigating the impact of anthropogenic pressures on wildlife. We use cheetahs Acinonyx jubatus as a case study to explore how a large carnivore responds to anthropogenic pressures inside wildlife areas. Using GPS-collar data we investigate cheetah space use, both when moving and stationary, and movement parameters (speed and turn angles) in relation to human disturbance, distance to human settlement, livestock abundance and livestock site use inside wildlife areas. Space use was negatively influenced by human disturbance, resulting in habitat loss and fragmentation and potentially reducing landscape permeability between neighbouring wildlife areas. Cheetahs were also less likely to stop in areas where livestock numbers were high, but more likely to stop in areas that were frequently used by livestock. The latter could reflect that cheetahs are attracted to livestock however, cheetahs in the study area rarely predated on livestock. It is therefore more likely that areas that are frequently used by livestock attract wild herbivores, which in turn could influence cheetah space use. We did not find any effects of people and livestock on cheetahs? speed and turn angles which might be related to the resolution of the data. We found that cheetahs are sensitive to human pressures and we believe that they could be an indicator species for other large carnivores facing similar challenges. We suggest that further research is needed to determine the levels of anthropogenic pressures needed to maintain ecological integrity, especially inside wildlife areas.  
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  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/acv.12483 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6522  
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Author (up) Burden, F.; Thiemann, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Donkeys Are Different Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Proceedings of the 2015 Equine Science Society Symposium  
  Volume 35 Issue 5 Pages 376-382  
  Keywords Donkey; Ass; Equid; Mule  
  Abstract As a unique species of equine, the donkey has certain specific variations from the horse. This review highlights the origins of the donkey and how this impacts on its behavior, physiology, and propensity to disease. The donkey is less of a flight animal and has been used by humans for pack and draught work, in areas where their ability to survive poorer diets, and transboundary disease while masking overt signs of pain and distress has made them indispensable to human livelihoods. When living as a companion animal, however, the donkey easily accumulates adipose tissue, and this may create a metabolically compromised individual prone to diseases of excess such as laminitis and hyperlipemia. They show anatomic variations from the horse especially in the hoof, upper airway, and their conformation. Variations in physiology lead to differences in the metabolism and distribution of many drugs. With over 44 million donkeys worldwide, it is important that veterinarians have the ability to understand and treat this equid effectively.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6541  
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Author (up) Burke, C.; Rashman, M.; Wich, S.; Symons, A.; Theron, C.; Longmore, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Optimizing observing strategies for monitoring animals using drone-mounted thermal infrared cameras Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 439-467  
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  Abstract ABSTRACTThe proliferation of relatively affordable off-the-shelf drones offers great opportunities for wildlife monitoring and conservation. Similarly the recent reduction in the cost of thermal infrared cameras also offers new promise in this field, as they have the advantage over conventional RGB cameras of being able to distinguish animals based on their body heat and being able to detect animals at night. However, the use of drone-mounted thermal infrared cameras comes with several technical challenges. In this article, we address some of these issues, namely thermal contrast problems due to heat from the ground, absorption and emission of thermal infrared radiation by the atmosphere, obscuration by vegetation, and optimizing the flying height of drones for a best balance between covering a large area and being able to accurately image and identify animals of interest. We demonstrate the application of these methods with a case study using field data and make the first ever detection of the critically endangered riverine rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis) in thermal infrared data. We provide a web-tool so that the community can easily apply these techniques to other studies (http://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/aricburk/uav_calc/).  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1080/01431161.2018.1558372 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6528  
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Author (up) Bödeker, E. openurl 
  Title Maultierzucht und Maultierhaltung Type Book Whole
  Year 1908 Publication Handbuch der gesamten Landwirtschaft. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 46 Pages  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Max Jänecke Place of Publication Hannover Editor  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6545  
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Author (up) Dunbar, R.I.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The social brain hypothesis and its implications for social evolution Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Annals of Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Annals of Human Biology  
  Volume 36 Issue 5 Pages 562-572  
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  Abstract The social brain hypothesis was proposed as an explanation for the fact that primates have unusually large brains for body size compared to all other vertebrates: Primates evolved large brains to manage their unusually complex social systems. Although this proposal has been generalized to all vertebrate taxa as an explanation for brain evolution, recent analyses suggest that the social brain hypothesis takes a very different form in other mammals and birds than it does in anthropoid primates. In primates, there is a quantitative relationship between brain size and social group size (group size is a monotonic function of brain size), presumably because the cognitive demands of sociality place a constraint on the number of individuals that can be maintained in a coherent group. In other mammals and birds, the relationship is a qualitative one: Large brains are associated with categorical differences in mating system, with species that have pairbonded mating systems having the largest brains. It seems that anthropoid primates may have generalized the bonding processes that characterize monogamous pairbonds to other non-reproductive relationships (?friendships?), thereby giving rise to the quantitative relationship between group size and brain size that we find in this taxon. This raises issues about why bonded relationships are cognitively so demanding (and, indeed, raises questions about what a bonded relationship actually is), and when and why primates undertook this change in social style.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4460 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1080/03014460902960289 Approved no  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6546  
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