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Author Palacios, V.; Font, E.; Marquez, R.
Title Iberian wolf howls: acoustic structure, individual variation, and a comparison with North American populations Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication J Mammal Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 88 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Palacios2007 Serial 6469
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Author Healy, S.D.; Rowe, C.
Title Costs and benefits of evolving a larger brain: doubts over the evidence that large brains lead to better cognition Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 86 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Healy2013 Serial 6317
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Author Stanley, C.R.; Dunbar, R.I.M.
Title Consistent social structure and optimal clique size revealed by social network analysis of feral goats, Capra hircus Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 85 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Stanley2013 Serial 6253
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Author Nelson, X.J.; Fijn, N.
Title The use of visual media as a tool for investigating animal behaviour Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 85 Issue 3 Pages 525-536
Keywords citizen science; crowdsourcing; internet; online resource; opportunistic observation; 'people power'; playback study; preliminary testing; YouTube
Abstract In this essay we outline how video-related technology can be used as a tool for studying animal behaviour. We review particular aspects of novel, innovative animal behaviour uploaded by the general public via video-based media on the internet (using YouTube as a specific example). The behaviour of animals, particularly the play behaviour focused on here, is viewed by huge audiences. In this essay we focused on three different kinds of media clips: (1) interspecies play between dogs and a range of other species; (2) object play in horses; and (3) animal responses to stimuli presented on iPads, iPods and iPhones. We argue that the use of video is a good means of capturing uncommon or previously unknown behaviour, providing evidence that these behaviours occur. Furthermore, some of the behaviours featured on YouTube provide valuable insights for future directions in animal behaviour research. If we also take this opportunity to convey our knowledge to a public that seems to be fundamentally interested in animal behaviour, this is a good means of bridging the gap between knowledge among an academic few and the general public.
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6432
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Author Podsakoff, P.M.; MacKenzie, S. B.; Lee, J.-Y.; Podsakoff, N. P.
Title Common method biases in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended remedies. Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Journal of Applied Psychology Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Psychol.
Volume (down) 85 Issue 5 Pages 879-903
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Abstract Interest in the problem of method biases has a long history in the behavioral sciences. Despite this, a comprehensive summary of the potential sources of method biases and how to control for them does not exist. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which method biases influence behavioral research results, identify potential sources of method biases, discuss the cognitive processes through which method biases influence responses to measures, evaluate the many different procedural and statistical techniques that can be used to control method biases, and provide recommendations for how to select appropriate procedural and statistical remedies for different types of research settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6435
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Author Hagen, K.; Broom, D.M.
Title Emotional reactions to learning in cattle Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume (down) 85 Issue 3 Pages 203-213
Keywords Cattle; Expressive behaviour; Operant learning; Reinforcer
Abstract It has been suggested that during instrumental learning, animals are likely to react emotionally to the reinforcer. They may in addition react emotionally to their own achievements. These reactions are of interest with regard to the animals' capacity for self-awareness. Therefore, we devised a yoked control experiment involving the acquisition of an operant task. We aimed to identify the emotional reactions of young cattle to their own learning and to separate these from reactions to a food reward. Twelve Holstein-Friesian heifers aged 7-12 months were divided into two groups. Heifers in the experimental group were conditioned over a 14-day period to press a panel in order to open a gate for access to a food reward. For heifers in the control group, the gate opened after a delay equal to their matched partner's latency to open it. To allow for observation of the heifers' movements during locomotion after the gate had opened, there was a 15m distance in the form of a race from the gate to the food trough. The heart rate of the heifers, and their behaviour when moving along the race towards the food reward were measured. When experimental heifers made clear improvements in learning, they were more likely than on other occasions to have higher heart rates and tended to move more vigorously along the race in comparison with their controls. This experiment found some, albeit inconclusive, indication that cattle may react emotionally to their own learning improvement.
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ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6551
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Author Thornton, A.; Samson, J.
Title Innovative problem solving in wild meerkats Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 83 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Thornton2012 Serial 6267
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Author Breitenmoser, U.
Title Large predators in the Alps: the fall and rise of man's competitors Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Biol Conserv Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 83 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Breitenmoser1998 Serial 6450
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Author Jedrzejewski, W.; Schmidt, K.; Theuerkauf, J.; Jedrzejewska, B.; Selva, N.; Zub, K.
Title Kill rate and predation by wolves on ungulate populations in Bialowieza primeval forest (Poland) Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 83 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Jedrzejewski2002 Serial 6481
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Author Cozzi, B.; Povinelli, M.; Ballarin, C.; Granato, A.
Title The Brain of the Horse: Weight and Cephalization Quotients Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Brain, Behavior and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Brain Behav Evol
Volume (down) 83 Issue 1 Pages 9-16
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Abstract The horse is a common domestic animal whose anatomy has been studied since the XVI century. However, a modern neuroanatomy of this species does not exist and most of the data utilized in textbooks and reviews derive from single specimens or relatively old literature. Here, we report information on the brain of Equus caballus obtained by sampling 131 horses, including brain weight (as a whole and subdivided into its constituents), encephalization quotient (EQ), and cerebellar quotient (CQ), and comparisons with what is known about other relevant species. The mean weight of the fresh brains in our experimental series was 598.63 g (SEM ± 7.65), with a mean body weight of 514.12 kg (SEM ± 15.42). The EQ was 0.78 and the CQ was 0.841. The data we obtained indicate that the horse possesses a large, convoluted brain, with a weight similar to that of other hoofed species of like mass. However, the shape of the brain, the noteworthy folding of the neocortex, and the peculiar longitudinal distribution of the gyri suggest an evolutionary specificity at least partially separate from that of the Cetartiodactyla (even-toed mammals and cetaceans) with whom Perissodactyla (odd-toed mammals) are often grouped.
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ISSN 0006-8977 ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6592
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