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Author Squire, L.
Title Memory systems of the brain: a brief history and current perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Neurobiol Learn Mem Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 82 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Squire2004 Serial 6365
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Author van de Waal, E.; Bshary, R.
Title Social-learning abilities of wild vervet monkeys in a two-step task artificial fruit experiment Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 81 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ van de Waal2011 Serial 6262
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Author van de Waal, E.; Bshary, R.
Title Contact with human facilities appears to enhance technical skills in wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Folia Primatol Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 81 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ van de Waal2010 Serial 6265
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Author Shettleworth, S.J.
Title The evolution of comparative cognition: is the snark still a Boojum? Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Behav Processes Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 80 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Shettleworth2009 Serial 6231
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Author Hare, B.; Rosati, A.; Kaminski, J.; Bräuer, J.; Call, J.; Tomasello, M.
Title The domestication hypothesis for dogs' skills with human communication: a response to Udell et al. (2008) and Wynne et al. (2008) Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Anim Behav Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 79 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Hare2010 Serial 6241
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Author Langbein, J.; Siebert, K.; Nuernberg, G.
Title Concurrent recall of serially learned visual discrimination problems in dwarf goats (Capra hircus) Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Behav Proc Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 79 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Langbein2008 Serial 6363
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Author Kruska, D.C.T.
Title Comparative quantitative investigations on brains of wild cavies (Cavia aperea) and guinea pigs (Cavia aperea f. porcellus). A contribution to size changes of CNS structures due to domestication Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde Abbreviated Journal Mamm Biol
Volume (down) 79 Issue 4 Pages 230-239
Keywords Domestication; Allometry; Brain structure volumes; Brain-behavior correlation
Abstract Intraspecific allometric calculations of the brain to body size relation revealed distinct differences between 127 (67; 60) ancestral wild cavies and 82 (37; 45) guinea pigs, their domesticated relatives. The dependency of both measures from one another remained the same in both animal groups but the brains of guinea pigs were by 14.22% smaller at any net body weight. Consistent with results in other species the domestication of Cavia aperea is also characterized by a decrease of brain size. Fresh tissue sizes of the five brain parts medulla oblongata, cerebellum, mesencephalon, diencephalon and telencephalon were determined for 6 cavies and 6 guinea pigs by the serial section method. Additionally the sizes of 16 endbrain structures and those of the optic tract, the lateral geniculate body and the cochlear nucleus were measured. Different decrease values resulted for all these structures concomitant with domestication as was calculated from the amount of total brain size decrease and average relative structure values in the wild as well as the domesticated brain. The size decrease of the entire telencephalon (-13.7%) was within the range of the mean overall reduction as similarly was the case for the total neocortex (-10.7%) whereas the total allocortex (-20.9%) clearly was more strongly affected. The size decrease of the olfactory bulb (-41.9%) was extreme and clearly higher than found for the secondary olfactory structures (around -11%). The primary nuclei of other sensory systems (vision, audition) were decreased to less extent (lateral geniculate: -18.1%; cochlear nucleus: -12.6%). Mass decreases of pure white matter parts were nearly twice as high in contrast to associated grey matter parts (neocortex white versus grey matter; tractus opticus versus lateral geniculate body). The relatively great decrease values found for the limbic structures hippocampus (-26.9%) and schizocortex (-25.9%) are especially notable since they are in good conformity with domestication effects in other mammalian species. The findings of this study are discussed with regard to results of similar investigations on wild and domesticated gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), the encephalization of the wild form, the special and species-specific mode and duration of domestication and in connection with certain behavioral changes as resulted from comparative investigations in ethology, socio-biology, endocrinology and general physiology.
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ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Admin @ knut @ Serial 6401
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Author Kusunose, R.; Yamanobe, A.
Title The effect of training schedule on learned tasks in yearling horses Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal Appl. Anim. Behav. Sci.
Volume (down) 78 Issue 2 Pages 225-233
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Abstract Twelve yearlings were divided into two groups and subjected to two different training schedules: (a) 30min of training daily (the daily trained group); and (b) 30min of training for 4 days, followed by a 3-day rest (the intermittently trained group), in order to compare the effect of two training methods on the ability of the horses to learn to be driven and ridden and to respond to the handlers? cues. The length of this experimental training was 17 days. The first step of training was surcingling and proceeded to lunging, to driving from the ground, and finally to being ridden at a trot on a track. Both groups were tested four times during the experimental period when they were at the same stage of training. They were driven and then ridden at a walk by a rider on a specified course and evaluated. The time to complete the course, accuracy of traveling the course, and heart rate during the test were used as the indicators of success in training. In three out of the four tests, the daily trained group tended to move faster and with more accuracy than the intermittently trained group. It would appear that daily training without a long interruption is more effective for yearlings.
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Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium
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Notes doi: 10.1016/S0168-1591(02)00089-8 Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6382
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Author Gese, E.M.; Ruff, R.L.
Title Howling by coyotes (Canis latrans): variation among social classes, seasons, and pack sizes Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Can J Zool Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 76 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Gese1998 Serial 6462
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Author Rutberg, A.T.
Title Horse Fly Harassment and the Social Behavior of Feral Ponies Type Journal Article
Year 1987 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology
Volume (down) 75 Issue 2 Pages 145-154
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Abstract Abstract Horse flies (Tabanidae) on and around feral ponies in harem groups were counted at Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland, U.S.A., between June and August 1985. Harem stallions attracted the most flies; adult mares showed intermediate fly numbers, while few flies landed on foals under any circumstances. The use of thermal and chemical cues by flies selecting a host may have helped create this disparity. When flies were abundant, ponies reduced spacing within the group. Ponies in larger groups suffered from fewer flies than ponies in smaller groups. There was, however, no evidence that ponies merged into larger groups in response to fly harassment, suggesting that biting flies play little role in structuring pony social organization.
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Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium
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Notes doi: 10.1111/j.1439-0310.1987.tb00648.x Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6417
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