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Author Heyes, C.
Title What's social about social learning? Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication J Comp Psychol Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 120 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Heyes2012 Serial 6228
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Author Apollonio, M.; Mattioli, L.; Scandura, M.; Mauri, L.; Gazzola, A.; Avanzinelli, E.
Title Wolves in the Casentinesi Forests: insights for wolf conservation in Italy from a protected area with a rich wild prey community Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Biol Conserv Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 120 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Apollonio2004 Serial 6475
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Author Richards, D.G.; Wiley, R.H.
Title Reverberations and Amplitude Fluctuations in the Propagation of Sound in a Forest: Implications for Animal Communication Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Am Nat Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 115 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Richards2008 Serial 6485
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Author Custance, D.; Whiten, A.; Fredman, T.
Title Social learning of an artificial fruit task in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella). Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology Abbreviated Journal J. Comp. Psychol.
Volume (down) 113 Issue 1 Pages 13-23
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Abstract Social learning in 11 human-raised capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) was investigated using an artificial fruit that was designed as an analogue of natural foraging problems faced by primates. Each subject observed a human model open each of 3 principal components on the fruit in 1 of 2 alternative ways (“morphs”). The capuchin monkeys reproduced, to differing extents, the alternative techniques used for opening 1 component of the task (poking vs. pulling while twisting out a pair of smooth plastic bolts) but not the other 2. From the subjects' actions on the bolt latch, independent coders could recognize which morph they had witnessed, and they observed a degree of matching to the demonstrator's act consistent with simple imitation or object movement reenactment (A learns from watching B how an object, or parts of an object, move). Thus, these capuchins were capable of more complex social learning than has been recently ascribed to monkeys. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6563
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Author Smaers, J.B.; Dechmann, D.K.N.; Goswami, A.; Soligo, C.; Safi, K.
Title Comparative analyses of evolutionary rates reveal different pathways to encephalization in bats, carnivorans, and primates Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 109 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Smaers2012 Serial 6238
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Author Griffin, A.S.; Guez, D.
Title Innovation and problem solving: A review of common mechanisms Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav. Process.
Volume (down) 109 Issue Pages 121-134
Keywords Behavioural flexibility; Cognition; Innovation; Problem solving
Abstract Behavioural innovations have become central to our thinking about how animals adjust to changing environments. It is now well established that animals vary in their ability to innovate, but understanding why remains a challenge. This is because innovations are rare, so studying innovation requires alternative experimental assays that create opportunities for animals to express their ability to invent new behaviours, or use pre-existing ones in new contexts. Problem solving of extractive foraging tasks has been put forward as a suitable experimental assay. We review the rapidly expanding literature on problem solving of extractive foraging tasks in order to better understand to what extent the processes underpinning problem solving, and the factors influencing problem solving, are in line with those predicted, and found, to underpin and influence innovation in the wild. Our aim is to determine whether problem solving can be used as an experimental proxy of innovation. We find that in most respects, problem solving is determined by the same underpinning mechanisms, and is influenced by the same factors, as those predicted to underpin, and to influence, innovation. We conclude that problem solving is a valid experimental assay for studying innovation, propose a conceptual model of problem solving in which motor diversity plays a more central role than has been considered to date, and provide recommendations for future research using problem solving to investigate innovation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6556
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Author Riede, T.; Herzel, H.; Mehwald, D.; Seidner, W.; Trumler, E.; Böhme, G.
Title Nonlinear phenomena in the natural howling of a dog-wolf mix Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication J Acoust Soc Am Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 108 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Riede2000 Serial 6484
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Author Morand-Ferron, J.; Quinn, J.L.
Title Larger groups of passerines are more efficient problem solvers in the wild Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
Volume (down) 108 Issue 38 Pages 15898-15903
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Abstract Group living commonly helps organisms face challenging environmental conditions. Although a known phenomenon in humans, recent findings suggest that a benefit of group living in animals generally might be increased innovative problem-solving efficiency. This benefit has never been demonstrated in a natural context, however, and the mechanisms underlying improved efficiency are largely unknown. We examined the problem-solving performance of great and blue tits at automated devices and found that efficiency increased with flock size. This relationship held when restricting the analysis to naive individuals, demonstrating that larger groups increased innovation efficiency. In addition to this effect of naive flock size, the presence of at least one experienced bird increased the frequency of solving, and larger flocks were more likely to contain experienced birds. These findings provide empirical evidence for the “pool of competence” hypothesis in nonhuman animals. The probability of success also differed consistently between individuals, a necessary condition for the pool of competence hypothesis. Solvers had a higher probability of success when foraging with a larger number of companions and when using devices located near rather than further from protective tree cover, suggesting a role for reduced predation risk on problem-solving efficiency. In contrast to traditional group living theory, individuals joining larger flocks benefited from a higher seed intake, suggesting that group living facilitated exploitation of a novel food source through improved problem-solving efficiency. Together our results suggest that both ecological and social factors, through reduced predation risk and increased pool of competence, mediate innovation in natural populations.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6539
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Author Frère, C.H.; Krützen, M.; Mann, J.; Connor, R.C.; Bejder, L.; Sherwin, W.B.
Title Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Proc Natl Acad Sci USA Abbreviated Journal Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
Volume (down) 107 Issue 46 Pages 19949-19954
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Abstract The evolutionary forces that drive fitness variation in species are of considerable interest. Despite this, the relative importance and interactions of genetic and social factors involved in the evolution of fitness traits in wild mammalian populations are largely unknown. To date, a few studies have demonstrated that fitness might be influenced by either social factors or genes in natural populations, but none have explored how the combined effect of social and genetic parameters might interact to influence fitness. Drawing from a long-term study of wild bottlenose dolphins in the eastern gulf of Shark Bay, Western Australia, we present a unique approach to understanding these interactions. Our study shows that female calving success depends on both genetic inheritance and social bonds. Moreover, we demonstrate that interactions between social and genetic factors also influence female fitness. Therefore, our study represents a major methodological advance, and provides critical insights into the interplay of genetic and social parameters of fitness.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6412
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Author Liker, A.; Bókony, V.
Title Larger groups are more successful in innovative problem solving in house sparrows Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
Volume (down) 106 Issue 19 Pages 7893-7898
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Abstract Group living offers well-known benefits to animals, such as better predator avoidance and increased foraging success. An important additional, but so far neglected, advantage is that groups may cope more effectively with unfamiliar situations through faster innovations of new solutions by some group members. We tested this hypothesis experimentally by presenting a new foraging task of opening a familiar feeder in an unfamiliar way to house sparrows in small and large groups (2 versus 6 birds). Group size had strong effects on problem solving: sparrows performed 4 times more and 11 times faster openings in large than in small groups, and all members of large groups profited by getting food sooner (7 times on average). Independently from group size, urban groups were more successful than rural groups. The disproportionately higher success in large groups was not a mere consequence of higher number of attempts, but was also related to a higher effectiveness of problem solving (3 times higher proportion of successful birds). The analyses of the birds' behavior suggest that the latter was not explained by either reduced investment in antipredator vigilance or reduced neophobia in large groups. Instead, larger groups may contain more diverse individuals with different skills and experiences, which may increase the chance of solving the task by some group members. Increased success in problem solving may promote group living in animals and may help them to adapt quickly to new situations in rapidly-changing environments.
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6538
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