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Author Shmidt Mech, L.D.
Title Wolf pack size and food acquisition Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication Am Nat Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 150 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Shmidt Mech1997 Serial 6482
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Author Zajonc, R.B.
Title Social Facilitation Type Journal Article
Year 1965 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume (down) 149 Issue 3681 Pages 269-274
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Abstract 300 Multiple ChoicesThis is a pdf-only article and there is no markup to show you.full-text.pdf
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6565
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Author Briefer, E.F.; McElligott, A.G.
Title Rescued goats at a sanctuary display positive mood after former neglect Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 146 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2013 Serial 6287
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Author Pérez-Barbería, F.J.; Gordon, I.J.
Title Gregariousness increases brain size in ungulates Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 145 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Pérez-Barbería2005 Serial 6258
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Author Ripple, W.J.; Beschta, R.L.
Title Trophic cascades in Yellowstone: The first 15 years after wolf reintroduction Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Biol Conserv Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 145 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Ripple2012 Serial 6452
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Author Albiach-Serrano, A.; Bräuer, J.; Cacchione, T.; Zickert, N.; Amici, F.
Title The effect of domestication and ontogeny in swine cognition (Sus scrofa scrofa and S. s. domestica) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 141 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Albiach-Serrano2012 Serial 6329
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Author Quaresmini, C.; Forrester, G.S.; Spiezio, C.; Vallortigara, G.
Title Social environment elicits lateralized behaviors in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 128 Issue 3 Pages 276-284
Keywords *Animal Ethology; *Animal Social Behavior; *Chimpanzees; *Gorillas; *Social Influences; Cerebral Dominance; Lateral Dominance; Social Environments
Abstract The influence of the social environment on lateralized behaviors has now been investigated across a wide variety of animal species. New evidence suggests that the social environment can modulate behavior. Currently, there is a paucity of data relating to how primates navigate their environmental space, and investigations that consider the naturalistic context of the individual are few and fragmented. Moreover, there are competing theories about whether only the right or rather both cerebral hemispheres are involved in the processing of social stimuli, especially in emotion processing. Here we provide the first report of lateralized social behaviors elicited by great apes. We employed a continuous focal animal sampling method to record the spontaneous interactions of a captive zoo-living colony of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and a biological family group of peer-reared western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). We specifically focused on which side of the body (i.e., front, rear, left, right) the focal individual preferred to keep conspecifics. Utilizing a newly developed quantitative corpus-coding scheme, analysis revealed both chimpanzees and gorillas demonstrated a significant group-level preference for focal individuals to keep conspecifics positioned to the front of them compared with behind them. More interestingly, both groups also manifested a population-level bias to keep conspecifics on their left side compared with their right side. Our findings suggest a social processing dominance of the right hemisphere for context-specific social environments. Results are discussed in light of the evolutionary adaptive value of social stimulus as a triggering factor for the manifestation of group-level lateralized behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Address Quaresmini, Caterina: Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences, University of Trento, Corso Bettini 31, Rovereto, Italy, 38068, caterina.quaresmini@gmail.com
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Publisher American Psychological Association Place of Publication Us Editor
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ISSN 1939-2087(Electronic),0735-7036(Print) ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ 2014-13828-001 Serial 6396
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Author Christensen, J.W.; Beekmans, M.; van Dalum, M.; VanDierendonck, M.
Title Effects of hyperflexion on acute stress responses in ridden dressage horses Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol. Behav.
Volume (down) 128 Issue Pages 39-45
Keywords Behaviour; Dressage; Horse; Hyperflexion; Rein tension; Stress
Abstract The effects of hyperflexion on the welfare of dressage horses have been debated. This study aimed to investigate acute stress responses of dressage horses ridden in three different Head-and-Neck-positions (HNPs). Fifteen dressage horses were ridden by their usual rider in a standardised 10-min dressage programme in either the competition frame (CF), hyperflexion (“Low-Deep-and-Round”; LDR) or a looser frame (LF) in a balanced order on three separate test days. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability parameters (HRV), behaviour and rein tension were recorded during the test. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured 60min before and 0, 5, 15 and 30min after the test. Rein tension was significantly lower in LF and did not differ between CF and LDR; however approx. 15% of recordings in CF and LDR were above the sensor detection limit of 5kg. The horses had significantly higher cortisol concentrations directly after LDR compared to LF. In addition, the horses showed more distinctive head movements, including head waving, during LDR. There were no significant treatment effects on HR and HRV. In conclusion, the results indicate that LDR may be more stressful to these horses during riding.
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ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6507
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Author Dorey, N.R.; Conover, A.M.; Udell, M.A.R.
Title Interspecific communication from people to horses (Equus ferus caballus) is influenced by different horsemanship training styles Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology, Abbreviated Journal J. Comp. Psychol.
Volume (down) 128 Issue 4 Pages 337-342
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Abstract The ability of many domesticated animals to follow human pointing gestures to locate hidden food has led to scientific debate on the relative importance of domestication and individual experience on the origins and development of this capacity. To further explore this question, we examined the influence of different prior training histories/methods on the ability of horses (Equus ferus caballus) to follow a momentary distal point. Ten horses previously trained using one of two methods (Parelli™ natural horsemanship or traditional horse training) were tested using a standard object choice task. The results show that neither group of horses was initially able to follow the momentary distal point. However, after more experience with the point, horses previously trained using the Parelli natural horsemanship method learned to follow momentary distal points significantly faster than those previously trained with traditional methods. The poor initial performance of horses on distal pointing tasks, coupled with the finding that prior training history and experimental experience can lead to success on this task, fails to support the predictions of the domestication hypothesis and instead lends support to the two-stage hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6564
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Author Heyes, C.
Title What's social about social learning? Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication J Comp Psychol Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 120 Issue Pages
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Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Heyes2012 Serial 6228
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