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Author Zohary, D.; Tchernov, E.; Horwitz, L.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The role of unconscious selection in the domestication of sheep and goats Type
  Year 1998 Publication J Zool Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 245 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Zohary1998 Serial 6240  
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Author Benson-Amram, S.; Holekamp, K.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Innovative problem solving by wild spotted hyenas Type
  Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 279 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Benson-Amram2012 Serial 6266  
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Author Briefer, E.F.; Padilla de la Torre, M.; McElligott, A.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mother goats do not forget their kids' calls Type
  Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 279 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Briefer2012 Serial 6282  
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Author Whiten, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imitation of the sequential structure of actions by chimpanzees Type
  Year 1998 Publication J Comp Psychol Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Whiten1998 Serial 6291  
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Author Bates, D. openurl 
  Title Fitting linear mixed models in R Type
  Year 2005 Publication R News Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Bates2005 Serial 6293  
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Author openurl 
  Title R Foundation for Statistical Computing Type
  Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
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  Publisher R Foundation for Statistical Computing Place of Publication Vienna, Austria Editor (up)  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ ref80 Serial 6295  
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Author Zentall, T.R.; Sutton, J.E.; Sherburne, L.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title True imitative learning in pigeons Type
  Year 1996 Publication Psychol Sci Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Zentall1996 Serial 6372  
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Author Merkies, K.; McKechnie, M.J.; Zakrajsek, E. doi  openurl
  Title Behavioural and physiological responses of therapy horses to mentally traumatized humans Type
  Year 2018 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Equine-assisted therapy; Ptsd; Horse; Behaviour; Cortisol; Heart rate  
  Abstract The benefits to humans of equine-assisted therapy (EAT) have been well-researched, however few studies have analyzed the effects on the horse. Understanding how differing mental states of humans affect the behaviour and response of the horse can assist in providing optimal outcomes for both horse and human. Four humans clinically diagnosed and under care of a psychotherapist for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) were matched physically to four neurotypical control humans and individually subjected to each of 17 therapy horses loose in a round pen. A professional acting coach instructed the control humans in replicating the physical movements of their paired PTSD individual. Both horses and humans were equipped with a heart rate (HR) monitor recording HR every 5secs. Saliva samples were collected from each horse 30 min before and 30 min after each trial to analyze cortisol concentrations. Each trial consisted of 5 min of baseline observation of the horse alone in the round pen after which the human entered the round pen for 2 min, followed by an additional 5 min of the horse alone. Behavioural observations indicative of stress in the horse (gait, head height, ear orientation, body orientation, distance from the human, latency of approach to the human, vocalizations, and chewing) were retrospectively collected from video recordings of each trial and analyzed using a repeated measures GLIMMIX with Tukey's multiple comparisons for differences between treatments and time periods. Horses moved slower (p < 0.0001), carried their head lower (p < 0.0001), vocalized less (p < 0.0001), and chewed less (p < 0.0001) when any human was present with them in the round pen. Horse HR increased in the presence of the PTSD humans, even after the PTSD human left the pen (p < 0.0001). Since two of the PTSD/control human pairs were experienced with horses and two were not, a post-hoc analysis showed that horses approached quicker (p < 0.016) and stood closer (p < 0.0082) to humans who were experienced with horses. Horse HR was lower when with inexperienced humans (p < 0.0001) whereas inexperienced human HR was higher (p < 0.0001). Horse salivary cortisol did not differ between exposure to PTSD and control humans (p > 0.32). Overall, behavioural and physiological responses of horses to humans are more pronounced based on human experience with horses than whether the human is diagnosed with a mental disorder. This may be a reflection of a directness of movement associated with humans who are experienced with horses that makes the horse more attentive. It appears that horses respond more to physical cues from the human rather than emotional cues. This knowledge is important in tailoring therapy programs and justifying horse responses when interacting with a patient in a therapy setting.  
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  ISSN 0168-1591 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6385  
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Author Sueur, C.; Jacobs, A.; Amblard, F.; Petit, O.; King, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How can social network analysis improve the study of primate behavior? Type
  Year 2010 Publication American Journal of Primatology Abbreviated Journal Am. J. Primatol.  
  Volume 73 Issue 8 Pages 703-719  
  Keywords interaction; association; social system; social structure; methodology; behavioral sampling  
  Abstract Abstract When living in a group, individuals have to make trade-offs, and compromise, in order to balance the advantages and disadvantages of group life. Strategies that enable individuals to achieve this typically affect inter-individual interactions resulting in nonrandom associations. Studying the patterns of this assortativity using social network analyses can allow us to explore how individual behavior influences what happens at the group, or population level. Understanding the consequences of these interactions at multiple scales may allow us to better understand the fitness implications for individuals. Social network analyses offer the tools to achieve this. This special issue aims to highlight the benefits of social network analysis for the study of primate behaviour, assessing it's suitability for analyzing individual social characteristics as well as group/population patterns. In this introduction to the special issue, we first introduce social network theory, then demonstrate with examples how social networks can influence individual and collective behaviors, and finally conclude with some outstanding questions for future primatological research. Am. J. Primatol. 73:703?719, 2011. ? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.  
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  Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Place of Publication Editor (up)  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0275-2565 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes doi: 10.1002/ajp.20915 Approved  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6410  
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Author Schino, G.; Aureli, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reciprocity in group-living animals: partner control versus partner choice Type
  Year 2016 Publication Biological Reviews Abbreviated Journal Biol Rev  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 665-672  
  Keywords cooperation; reciprocity; partner control; partner choice; proximate mechanisms  
  Abstract ABSTRACT Reciprocity is probably the most debated of the evolutionary explanations for cooperation. Part of the confusion surrounding this debate stems from a failure to note that two different processes can result in reciprocity: partner control and partner choice. We suggest that the common observation that group-living animals direct their cooperative behaviours preferentially to those individuals from which they receive most cooperation is to be interpreted as the result of the sum of the two separate processes of partner control and partner choice. We review evidence that partner choice is the prevalent process in primates and propose explanations for this pattern. We make predictions that highlight the need for studies that separate the effects of partner control and partner choice in a broader variety of group-living taxa.  
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  Publisher Wiley/Blackwell (10.1111) Place of Publication Editor (up)  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1464-7931 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes doi: 10.1111/brv.12248 Approved  
  Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6411  
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