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Author (up)
Title R Foundation for Statistical Computing Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
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Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher R Foundation for Statistical Computing Place of Publication Vienna, Austria Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ ref80 Serial 6295
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Author (up) A. Wiggins; K. Crowston
Title From Conservation to Crowdsourcing: A Typology of Citizen Science Type Conference Article
Year 2011 Publication 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences Abbreviated Journal 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords groupware; natural sciences computing; research and development; social sciences; crowdsourcing; citizen science typology; research collaboration; scientific research projects; virtual collaboration; Communities; Education; Monitoring; Collaboration; Organizations; Biological system modeling; Production
Abstract Citizen science is a form of research collaboration involving members of the public in scientific research projects to address real-world problems. Often organized as a virtual collaboration, these projects are a type of open movement, with collective goals addressed through open participation in research tasks. Existing typologies of citizen science projects focus primarily on the structure of participation, paying little attention to the organizational and macrostructural properties that are important to designing and managing effective projects and technologies. By examining a variety of project characteristics, we identified five types-Action, Conservation, Investigation, Virtual, and Education- that differ in primary project goals and the importance of physical environment to participation.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1530-1605 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6430
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Author (up) Adelman, M.; Knijnik, J.
Title Gender and Equestrian Sport Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords British Equestrian Sport Canadian Show Jumping Cojones and Rejones Comparative Analysis Equestrian World through a Gender Lens Equestrianism during the 20th Century Fluid Masculinities on Brazilian Dressage Gender Studies and Equestrian Sport Horseracing and Gender in the United Kingdom Juvenile Equine Fiction for Girls Men and Horse Riding Spanish Mounted Bullfight Sport and Culture Swedish Equestrian Sports Women Riding Rodeo in Southern Brazil Women in Equestrian Polo
Abstract This volume brings together studies from various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities (Anthropology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, History and Literary theory) that examine the equestrian world as a historically gendered and highly dynamic field of contemporary sport and culture. From elite international dressage and jumping, polo and the turf, to the rodeo world of the Americas and popular forms of equestrian sport and culture, we are introduced to a range of issues as they unfold at local and global, national and international levels. Students and scholars of gender, culture and sport will find much of interest in this original look at contemporary issues such as “engendered” (women’s and men’s) dentities/subjectivities of equestrians, representations of girls, horses and the world of adventure in juvenile fiction; the current “feminization” of particular equestrian activities (and where boys and men stand in relation to this); how broad forms of social inequality and stratification play themselves out within gendered equestrian contexts; men and women and their relation to horses within the framework of current discussions on the relation of animals to humans (which may include not only love and care, but also exploitation and violence), among others. Singular contributions that incorporate a wide variety of classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical methodologies show how horse cultures around the globe contribute to historical and current constructions of embodied “femininities” and “masculinities”, reflecting a world that has been moving “beyond the binaries” while continuing to be enmeshed in their persistent and contradictory legacy. The final chapter makes a brave attempt at synthesizing individual chapters and moving forward from the evidences they provide, to suggest a compelling agenda for future research.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Dordrecht Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-94-007-6823-9 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6389
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Author (up) Albiach-Serrano, A.; Bräuer, J.; Cacchione, T.; Zickert, N.; Amici, F.
Title The effect of domestication and ontogeny in swine cognition (Sus scrofa scrofa and S. s. domestica) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Appl Anim Behav Sci Abbreviated Journal
Volume 141 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Albiach-Serrano2012 Serial 6329
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Author (up) Aldezabal, A.; Garin, I.
Title Browsing preference of feral goats (Capra hircus L.) in a Mediterranean mountain scrubland Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication J Arid Env Abbreviated Journal
Volume 44 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Aldezabal2000 Serial 6256
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Author (up) Baciadonna, L.; McElligott, A.G.; Briefer, E.F.
Title Goats favour personal over social information in an experimental foraging task Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Peer J Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Baciadonna2013 Serial 6269
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Author (up) Baker, P.J.; Funk, S.M.; Harris, S.; White, P.C.L.
Title Flexible spatial organization of urban foxes, Vulpes vulpes, before and during an outbreak of sarcoptic mange Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim. Behav.
Volume 59 Issue 1 Pages 127-146
Keywords
Abstract The social and spatial organization of urban fox groups prior to and during an outbreak of sarcoptic mange was compared with predictions derived from the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH). We investigated the availability of three key resources. Neither daytime rest sites nor breeding sites appeared to be limited in availability. The availability of food deliberately supplied by local householders was examined by questionnaire surveys. The daily and weekly amount of food supplied was greatly in excess of the minimum requirements of a pair of foxes, but was consistent between territories. The availability of this food source increased markedly as a result of more people feeding the foxes. In agreement with the RDH, group size prior to the outbreak of mange increased from 2.25 animals (N=4) to 6.57 animals (N=7). Before the outbreak of mange, two territories were divided. Increased scavenge availability on smaller territories may have promoted these changes. Excluding these spatial changes, territories were very stable between years. After the outbreak of mange, group size declined as a direct result of mange-induced mortality. Surviving animals increased their ranges only after neighbouring groups had died out. Ranges did not increase in size in response to a decline in food availability. Nor were the increases in range size associated with the relinquishment of parts of the existing territory. These postmange changes are contrary to the RDH. Three factors may have promoted these changes: the elimination of interstitial space, the forced dispersal of young or future division of the territory.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6431
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Author (up) Bates, D.
Title Fitting linear mixed models in R Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication R News Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue Pages
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Bates2005 Serial 6293
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Author (up) Beery, A.K.; Kaufer, D.
Title Stress, social behavior, and resilience: Insights from rodents Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Neurobiology of Stress Abbreviated Journal Neurobiol. Stress
Volume 1 Issue Stress Resilience Pages 116-127
Keywords Stress; Anxiety; Social behavior; Sociality; Social stress; Social buffering
Abstract The neurobiology of stress and the neurobiology of social behavior are deeply intertwined. The social environment interacts with stress on almost every front: social interactions can be potent stressors; they can buffer the response to an external stressor; and social behavior often changes in response to stressful life experience. This review explores mechanistic and behavioral links between stress, anxiety, resilience, and social behavior in rodents, with particular attention to different social contexts. We consider variation between several different rodent species and make connections to research on humans and non-human primates.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-2895 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 6413
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Author (up) Benson-Amram, S.; Holekamp, K.E.
Title Innovative problem solving by wild spotted hyenas Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Proc R Soc B Abbreviated Journal
Volume 279 Issue Pages
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Benson-Amram2012 Serial 6266
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