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Author Geutjens, C.A.; Clayton, H.M.; Kaiser, L.J.
Title Forces and pressures beneath the saddle during mounting from the ground and from a raised mounting platform Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 175 Issue 3 Pages (down) 332-337
Keywords Electronic saddle mat; Total force; Peak pressure; Equestrian; Kinetics
Abstract The objective was to use an electronic pressure mat to measure and compare forces and pressures of the saddle on a horse's back when riders mounted from the ground and with the aid of a mounting platform. Ten riders mounted a horse three times each from the ground and from a 35 cm high mounting platform in random order. Total force (summation of forces over all 256 sensors) was measured and compared at specific points on the force-time curve. Total force was usually highest as the rider's right leg was swinging upwards and was correlated with rider mass. When normalized to rider mass, total force and peak pressure were significantly higher when mounting from the ground than from a raised platform (P < 0.05). The area of highest pressure was on the right side of the withers in 97% of mounting efforts, confirming the importance of the withers in stabilizing the saddle during mounting.
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Call Number Admin @ knut @ Serial 4344
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Author Belock, B.; Kaiser, L.J.; Lavagnino, M.; Clayton, H.M.
Title Comparison of pressure distribution under a conventional saddle and a treeless saddle at sitting trot Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 193 Issue 1 Pages (down) 87-91
Keywords Horse; Rider; Equitation; Tack; Electronic pressure mat
Abstract It can be a challenge to find a conventional saddle that is a good fit for both horse and rider. An increasing number of riders are purchasing treeless saddles because they are thought to fit a wider range of equine back shapes, but there is only limited research to support this theory. The objective of this study was to compare the total force and pressure distribution patterns on the horseís back with conventional and treeless saddles. The experimental hypotheses were that the conventional saddle would distribute the force over a larger area with lower mean and maximal pressures than the treeless saddle. Eight horses were ridden by a single rider at sitting trot with conventional and treeless saddles. An electronic pressure mat measured total force, area of saddle contact, maximal pressure and area with mean pressure >11 kPa for 10 strides with each saddle. Univariate ANOVA (P < 0.05) was used to detect differences between saddles. Compared with the treeless saddle, the conventional saddle distributed the riderís bodyweight over a larger area, had lower mean and maximal pressures and fewer sensors recording mean pressure >11 kPa. These findings suggested that the saddle tree was effective in distributing the weight of the saddle and rider over a larger area and in avoiding localized areas of force concentration.
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ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 5821
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Author Heleski, C.R.; McGreevy, P.D.; Kaiser, L.J.; Lavagnino, M.; Tans, E.; Bello, N.; Clayton, H.M.
Title Effects on behaviour and rein tension on horses ridden with or without martingales and rein inserts Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 181 Issue 1 Pages (down) 56-62
Keywords Horse behaviour; Horse welfare; Equitation science; Rein tension; Martingales
Abstract Unsteady hand position can cause discomfort to the horse, potentially leading to conflict behaviours (CB) such as head tossing or tail lashing. Some instructors feel that martingales or elastic rein inserts can reduce discomfort caused by inexperienced and unsteady hands. Others consider these devices to be inappropriate [`]crutches'. Four horses and nine riders were tested under three conditions in random order: plain reins, adjustable training martingales (TM), and elasticised rein inserts (RI). Rein-tension data (7 s) and behavioural data (30 s) were collected in each direction. Rein-tension data were collected via strain-gauge transducers. Behavioural data were assessed using an ethogram of defined behaviours. No differences in the number of CB were observed. Mean rein tension for TM was higher than that of RI or controls. Relative to the withers, the head was lower for horses ridden with martingales. Carefully fitted martingales may have a place in riding schools that teach novices.
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ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number Equine Behaviour @ team @ Serial 4807
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